Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Hyperinflation of the lungs.

  1. #1

    Hyperinflation of the lungs.

    I had to go and get some tests done this morning and a chest x-ray for my annual pulmonary visit next week. The chest x-ray came back normal but is stated, "There is overall hyperinflation."

    What is hyperinflation? Trapped air in the lungs? How do I get it out?

    I do pulmonary exercises twice a day on a Hill-Rom Airway Clearance System The Vest, 30 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes in the evening at 10 psi, 16Hz. At this setting it clears out all the secretions out of my lungs.

    Everything I read on the internet is for COPD, emphysema, asthma and cystic fibrosis but I just have a spinal cord injury at C6.

    Do I need to do more standing frame time to get the trapped air out?

    SCI-Nurse any input?

    Thanks,
    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  2. #2
    Unlikely this is related to your SCI, as hypoinflation is a much more likely result of partial respiratory muscle paralysis. Did you have a history of smoking or exposure to chemicals that could cause emphysema? A history of asthma?

    Here is some information from WebMD:

    Hyperinflated lungs occur when air gets trapped in the lungs and causes them to overinflate. Hyperinflated lungs can be caused by blockages in the air passages or by air sacs that are less elastic, which interferes with the expulsion of air from the lungs.

    Hyperinflated lungs are often seen in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) — a disorder that includes emphysema. Certain lung problems, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis, also can cause hyperinflation.

    In some cases, lungs can appear hyperinflated on X-rays for reasons unrelated to lung function. If it isn't clear what's causing the hyperinflation, your doctor might recommend additional testing, such as a computerized tomography (CT) of the chest and pulmonary function tests.
    Did you also have pulmonary function testing?
    You should discuss with your pulmonary physician whether or not further testing is indicated.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Unlikely this is related to your SCI, as hypoinflation is a much more likely result of partial respiratory muscle paralysis. Did you have a history of smoking or exposure to chemicals that could cause emphysema? A history of asthma?

    Here is some information from WebMD:



    Did you also have pulmonary function testing?
    You should discuss with your pulmonary physician whether or not further testing is indicated.

    (KLD)
    I never smoked, drink alcohol, use drugs or exposed to chemicals in the work place. I live a clean life. I still live a clean life and watch what I eat, no meat. I was very active before my injury training for Cleveland's first triathlon in June 1987. I got injured March 23, 1987. When I was released from hospital I ran after my dreams, ambitions and goals in life and I'm still running!

    I have breathing spirometry tests before my doctor's visit, then I see the doctor.

    I always have a list of questions for my pulmonologist. I will discuss with him the hyperinflation of the lungs issue. He deals with people who have nuromuscular diseases as well as other patients who have respiratory system issues.

    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  4. #4
    It sounds like your pulmonologist should be able to answer your questions. Let us know what the answer is.
    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    Could it be related to use of the vest? Or maybe a disease process related to whatever is causing the secretions it treats?

  6. #6
    I don't think it is related to the vest, but it is worth having it checked out - by your pulmonologist or a respiratory therapist.
    Good suggestion-
    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

Similar Threads

  1. Lungs
    By #LHB# in forum Cure
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-18-2012, 07:39 PM
  2. Fluid in Lungs
    By Mike Honcho in forum Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-20-2011, 10:02 PM
  3. lungs??
    By in forum Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-11-2003, 08:21 AM
  4. Sci & lungs?
    By monkeygirl in forum Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-06-2002, 02:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •