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Thread: New about Paralympics in Japan

  1. #1
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    New about Paralympics in Japan

    www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/jun/10/tokyo-2020-u-turn-as-hotels-agree-to-wheelchair-rooms-for-paralympics

    Last April The Guardian reported that British Paralympic officials were stunned when hotels near their training camp in Yokohama, south of Tokyo, demanded they pay to make rooms accessible ? and then pay again to convert them back afterwards. Finally the Yokahama government intervened and a subsidy program to help existing hotels make refurbishments is being established. I still had to laugh at a lack of understanding revealed by this comment from the part of the cabinet co-ordinating Olympics planning:

    ?After the refurbishments, the hotel rooms will not go back to the original state. That is an agreement between the Yokohama city and the hotels. The rooms will be left as a legacy.? A legacy? I hope something is lost in translation there.

    I am guessing that disability rights campaigners in Japan will struggle for years with efforts to standardize requirements for what constitutes "accessible.''

    In Europe, I recently enquired of different river cruise companies if they have accessible accommodations. Nope. "Our boats are small. The hallways are narrow! We cannot accommodate wheelchairs!" Meanwhile these cruise companies have been busily commissioning new, bigger boats during this decade with more coming online in 2021 and 2022. How hard would it be to design 2 meters or less of the hallway wider for access to one single accessible room?

    The travel agent who helped me find information (she is based in Los Angeles) was both stunned and horrified. European attitudes are like the Japanese- we don't because we don't have to.

    Note - The Netherlands is a exception. There are several accessible tours available.




  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Tetracyclone View Post
    After the refurbishments, the hotel rooms will not go back to the original state. That is an agreement between the Yokohama city and the hotels. "The rooms will be left as a legacy." A legacy? I hope something is lost in translation there.
    I take this to mean a "legacy" from the Paralympics for future travelers; foreign and domestic tourists, traveling to that area. Japan is VERY inaccessible and rights for those with disabilities are not established by law (see pre-1991 USA).

    Quote Originally Posted by Tetracyclone View Post
    In Europe, I recently inquired of different river cruise companies if they have accessible accommodations. Nope. "Our boats are small. The hallways are narrow! We cannot accommodate wheelchairs!" Meanwhile these cruise companies have been busily commissioning new, bigger boats during this decade with more coming online in 2021 and 2022. How hard would it be to design 2 meters or less of the hallway wider for access to one single accessible room?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tetracyclone View Post

    The travel agent who helped me find information (she is based in Los Angeles) was both stunned and horrified. European attitudes are like the Japanese- we don't because we don't have to.

    Note - The Netherlands is a exception. There are several accessible tours available.
    The issue for river cruises in Europe (as well as Asia and Egypt) is not just the hallway size, but the ports. In nearly all ports, the river cruise ships (really like barges) have to tie up at the pier several ships abreast...as many as 6 ships. To get from the ship that gets the outside berth, you must climb up stairs to the top deck of the next ship shore-ward, then down the stairs, up the stairs to the next ship in the row, down to the next, etc. Some cruise lines allow these other passengers to cross through their lobbies, while others (for example, Viking) do not. Once you get to the pier, there are often stairs up to the street level.

    I went on one in the Netherlands & Belgium 2 years ago and there was a man who used a cane aboard ship due to a stroke (and a lightweight scooter ashore). He had to climb laboriously up/down the stairs like this to get ashore, although the crew of our ship did carry his scooter to shore for him.

    You will find river cruises in the USA (Mississippi and Columbia rivers) that have wheelchair accessible cabins and shore access.

    For those taking ocean cruises, rarely will any cruise line allow you to board tenders (small boats) to go ashore in ports where you are not at a pier but anchored instead. Now most require that you be able to walk onto the tender (including steps) under your own power without assistance. A manual wheelchair or walker will be lifted onto the tender unoccupied if needed. Even with that, the ships' safety officer will often not allow anyone with mobility disabilities onto the tender. The days of crew lifting someone in a manual wheelchair on and off the tender in ports is gone (this was done in the 1980s-the early 2000s on many ships).

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    I take this to mean a "legacy" from the Paralympics for future travelers; foreign and domestic tourists, traveling to that area. Japan is VERY inaccessible and rights for those with disabilities are not established by law (see pre-1991 USA).



    The issue for river cruises in Europe (as well as Asia and Egypt) is not just the hallway size, but the ports. In nearly all ports, the river cruise ships (really like barges) have to tie up at the pier several ships abreast...as many as 6 ships. To get from the ship that gets the outside berth, you must climb up stairs to the top deck of the next ship shore-ward, then down the stairs, up the stairs to the next ship in the row, down to the next, etc. Some cruise lines allow these other passengers to cross through their lobbies, while others (for example, Viking) do not. Once you get to the pier, there are often stairs up to the street level.

    I went on one in the Netherlands & Belgium 2 years ago and there was a man who used a cane aboard ship due to a stroke (and a lightweight scooter ashore). He had to climb laboriously up/down the stairs like this to get ashore, although the crew of our ship did carry his scooter to shore for him.

    You will find river cruises in the USA (Mississippi and Columbia rivers) that have wheelchair accessible cabins and shore access.

    For those taking ocean cruises, rarely will any cruise line allow you to board tenders (small boats) to go ashore in ports where you are not at a pier but anchored instead. Now most require that you be able to walk onto the tender (including steps) under your own power without assistance. A manual wheelchair or walker will be lifted onto the tender unoccupied if needed. Even with that, the ships' safety officer will often not allow anyone with mobility disabilities onto the tender. The days of crew lifting someone in a manual wheelchair on and off the tender in ports is gone (this was done in the 1980s-the early 2000s on many ships).

    (KLD)
    That is interesting KLD. Thanks. I personally was only interested in a European cruise because it was my idea to roll it into a visit to a dear friend in Belgium.

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