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Thread: My new box of 100 magic bullets says it expires next month

  1. #1

    My new box of 100 magic bullets says it expires next month

    I do my bowel program every other night and I just got a new box of suppositories that says expires July 2019. Obviously with 100 suppositories and doing a bowel program every other day they're going to last a while. Will they still be okay?

  2. #2
    mine always expire way to soon but still work knck on wood
    to alcohol the cause of-and solution to-all of lifes problems [homer simpson]

  3. #3
    Don't know if they're still using the same formula, but I've used them that were more than 5 years old and they worked. And that was a half of one.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by wheelman21 View Post
    I do my bowel program every other night and I just got a new box of suppositories that says expires July 2019. Obviously with 100 suppositories and doing a bowel program every other day they're going to last a while. Will they still be okay?
    Irritatingly enough this is pretty standard with Magic Bullets, even when you order directly from Concepts in Confidence instead of a third party medical supply company. There is a omplaint on the Amazon website that reads,
    "Received my order 3-6-18, EXPIRATION DATE 3/2018. UNACCEPTABLE!!!!!" I've never perceived any change in the way the Magic Bullets work even a few months after the expiration date.

    According to the Concepts in Confidence website:
    Magic Bullets only need to be refrigerated if the household temperature goes above 76 degrees. It is not recommended that they ever be frozen. Freezing can destroy the effectiveness of the active ingredient rendering the Magic Bullet useless.
    https://conceptsinconfidence.com/ind...:faqs&Itemid=4

    As an aside, this is an interesting bit of information published by Harvard Publishing (Medical School): https://www.health.harvard.edu/stayi...-mean-anything

    Drug Expiration Dates — Do They Mean Anything?

    Most of what is known about drug expiration dates comes from a study conducted by the Food and Drug Administration at the request of the military. With a large and expensive stockpile of drugs, the military faced tossing out and replacing its drugs every few years. What they found from the study is 90% of more than 100 drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, were perfectly good to use even 15 years after the expiration date.
    So the expiration date doesn't really indicate a point at which the medication is no longer effective or has become unsafe to use. Medical authorities state if expired medicine is safe to take, even those that expired years ago. A rare exception to this may be tetracycline, but the report on this is controversial among researchers. It's true the effectiveness of a drug may decrease over time, but much of the original potency still remains even a decade after the expiration date. Excluding nitroglycerin, insulin, and liquid antibiotics, most medications are as long-lasting as the ones tested by the military. Placing a medication in a cool place, such as a refrigerator, will help a drug remain potent for many years.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
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    Here I understand the problem to be the rate of half live increase upon expiration , for sure your shit output wil Be cut by 1/2 , No big deal.


    JB





    I'm

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim C. View Post
    Here I understand the problem to be the rate of half live increase upon expiration , for sure your shit output wil Be cut by 1/2 , No big deal.


    JB





    I'm
    Sorry, not following what you are saying.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    I have used magic bullets a year passed expiration and seen no difference. I customarily use 2/3 of one. I've found that my stock of clonazapam, the part that dates back 6 years, has lost some potency.

  8. #8
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB954201508530067326

    Many Medicines Are Potent Years Past Expiration Dates


    Laurie P. CohenStaff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal





    Fifteen years ago, the U.S. military decided to find out. Sitting on a $1 billion stockpile of drugs and facing the daunting process of destroying and replacing its supply every two to three years, the military began a testing program to see if it could extend the life of its inventory.
    The testing, conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, ultimately covered more than 100 drugs, prescription and over-the-counter. The results, never before reported, show that about 90% of them were safe and effective far past their original expiration date, at least one for 15 years past it.
    In light of these results, a former director of the testing program, Francis Flaherty, says he has concluded that expiration dates put on by manufacturers typically have no bearing on whether a drug is usable for longer.
    Mr. Flaherty notes that a drug maker is required to prove only that a drug is still good on whatever expiration date the company chooses to set. The expiration date doesn't mean, or even suggest, that the drug will stop being effective after that, nor that it will become harmful.

    "Manufacturers put expiration dates on for marketing, rather than scientific, reasons," says Mr. Flaherty, a pharmacist at the FDA until his retirement last year. "It's not profitable for them to have products on a shelf for 10 years. They want turnover."
    The FDA cautions that there isn't enough evidence from the program, which is weighted toward drugs needed during combat and which tests only individual manufacturing batches, to conclude that most drugs in people's medicine cabinets are potent beyond the expiration date. Still, Joel Davis, a former FDA expiration-date compliance chief, says that with a handful of exceptions -- notably nitroglycerin, insulin and some liquid antibiotics -- most drugs are probably as durable as those the agency has tested for the military. "Most drugs degrade very slowly," he says. "In all likelihood, you can take a product you have at home and keep it for any years, especially if it's in the refrigerator."

    Manufacturers' View
    Drug-industry officials don't dispute the results of the FDA's testing, within what is called the Shelf Life Extension Program. And they acknowledge that expiration dates have a commercial dimension. But they say relatively short shelf lives make sense from a public-safety standpoint, as well.
    New, more-beneficial drugs can be brought on the market more easily if the old ones are discarded within a couple of years, they say. Label redesigns work better when consumers don't have earlier versions on hand to create confusion. From the companies' perspective, any liability or safety risk is diminished by limiting the period during which a consumer might misuse or improperly store a drug.

    "Two to three years is a very comfortable point of commercial convenience," says Mark van Arandonk, senior director for pharmaceutical development at Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. "It gives us enough time to put the inventory in warehouses, ship it and ensure it will stay on shelves long enough to get used." But companies uniformly deny any effort to spur sales through planned obsolescence.

    (continued)

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