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Thread: Help me pick out my first manual chair

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldfatdad View Post
    First I'd stay away from the bike until your butt is completely healed. Emphasis on the completely. On this forum you will find a bias toward Tilites. I have a 35 year old Quickie folder and it works great for me. My only advice is to get a chair as adjustable as possible. Then fiddle with it. I even like aluminum chairs, because I can cut them and have them welded to fit me.
    I looked at powered wheels, but because I use a car, I got a Smart Drive. But I'm a para so I can put it on and off myself, but its difficult for a quad.
    Don't let them stick you in a power chair. I got the power assist, but can feel myself getting fat from it.

    Thanks so much for the reminder to not rush into the bike. It's been an awfully long road already dealing with this pressure sore, and I definitely don't want it to recur. I got the bike now primarily because bike-on was running low and I didn't want to miss my chance before the end of summer.
    Great advice about adjustability. I've read that several times here, and it's top of mind. My biggest worry is about anything that isn't adjustable, like frame measurements. I want to make sure I get those right! But of course, to your point some metals like aluminum can still be adjusted.
    As far as power wheels are concerned, I'm pretty sold on the idea especially since I don't transfer to a car. But I'll be damned if I get stuck in a power chair all the time! It'll be good for working at home at a standing desk, and just generally getting me standing on a regular basis, but it's not something I want to be my only vehicle. After 11 months of being pretty sedative, I'm eager to become active again

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ejl10 View Post
    That's fantastic to know. I hadn't heard about the new e-motion wheels, but will definitely look into them before I make any move!
    I've been waiting for the new e-motion wheels to get FDA clearance for years. Just like the Community Use package with the Twions, the issue seems to be the Bluetooth capabilities. Hopefully, they will both receive clearance soon.


  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinH View Post
    I have a heavy duty TiLite. It is almost infinitely adjustable within its setup range. Most of the modern sport chairs will likely work. Find the ones that work best with the Twion if there is an issue.

    My TiLite uses an axle pin that is 3/8" shorter than all other pins I have used in the last 37 years due to a non-standard hub diameter. Ordered a proper axle mount (threaded sleeve) and they sent me what I already had.

    My experience with sales reps suggests doing lots of your own research is best.
    Great to hear about the TiLite adjustability. That's absolutely what I like to hear since I'm pretty sure I'm not gonna get the adjustments right on the first go. But a bummer to hear about that axle pin - seems like nonstandard equipment is always a real hassle. And I couldn't agree more about sales reps in general. Occasionally they're knowledgeable and helpful, but more often than not they leave you with incomplete information.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Just curious, if your funding is Medicaid, how do you have enough funds to privately purchase a handcycle and a light-weight manual chair and power assist system?

    (KLD)
    Short answer is that I'm damn lucky. Here in Massachusetts, the Medicaid Mass Health program serves as a backstop to private insurance for folks with disabilities, and given that we're an expansion state it's reasonably generous. As luck would have it, that just happens to be where my power chair is coming through. Frankly, I don't have a whole lot of understanding about how the program is set up, but I'm glad it's there. As far as my funds go, I was fortunate to have some friends run fundraising activities with others in the climbing community on my behalf while I was still unconscious after the accident. I'm trying to spend that money on things that really make sense to get me active again. Seems like that's what everyone in the community wanted for me.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Unless you are set on titanium construction, there isn't any single best manufacturer in the "mainstream" ultralight rigid frame market.

    A couple of years ago, it appeared that TiLite was going to dominate everyone. In recent years, they've become a victim of their own success and have struggled to maintain their identity since being acquired by Permobil.

    Quickie has incrementally improved their products in recent years. They may not be particularly innovative, but their lineup is pretty solid and a good value.

    IMO, the two companies who have been responsible for much of the disruption and innovation in this space have been Motion Composites and Ki Mobility.

    While most people tend to be fixated on its weight, the Apex Carbon isn't really that much lighter than titanium or 7000 series aluminum. Nonetheless, I think it is a model that everyone needs to consider. Its greatest advantage is the stiffness of it's frame. It is a nicely engineered chair.

    While I haven't had any hands on experience yet, the Ki Mobility ethos is a modular design that looks like it could be precisely dialed in for the less experienced user.

    Everybody talks about vibration dampening, but they rarely talk about it in the most-significant context--keeping the feet solidly on the footplate going over surface irregularities. Both of these models are able to do that.

    While both companies are relative newcomers to the market, they have been responsive to feedback from the market and employee a number of individuals who played significant roles in the success of TiLite and Quickie.
    Really interesting to hear this. I haven't given too much thought to other materials like carbon fiber, but it's certainly worth the curiosity. I've always assumed that carbon fiber doesn't lend itself as well as the adjustability, but perhaps with the right set up that isn't so much of an issue. I've certainly heard rumors about struggles with dampening, so it's good to hear your counterpoint. I'll look into these other brands, thanks for the tip!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    I've been waiting for the new e-motion wheels to get FDA clearance for years. Just like the Community Use package with the Twions, the issue seems to be the Bluetooth capabilities. Hopefully, they will both receive clearance soon.
    Ugghhh... foiled by the FDA again!

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ejl10 View Post
    I haven't given too much thought to other materials like carbon fiber, but it's certainly worth the curiosity. I've always assumed that carbon fiber doesn't lend itself as well as the adjustability, but perhaps with the right set up that isn't so much of an issue.
    The Apex is a fully adjustable model. Motion Composites philosophy has always been to use carbon fiber where it makes sense, but use well designed aluminum components where adjustability is needed. With the Apex, the result isn't a chair that's stupid light. Rather, it's a chair with an exceptionally stiff frame that makes it efficient to push yet fully adjustable. This demo is comparable in weight to my ZR, is better over bumps, and is almost as efficient to push. In the 10+ years I've had my chair, no adjustable model has come close to meeting those criteria.
    Attached Images Attached Images     


  8. #18
    What amazes me is that the backrest & underseat rigidizers as well as the caster arms clamp onto the frame. They must be built to extremely precise tolerances because you'd never guess it given the stiffness of the frame.


  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinH View Post
    I have a heavy duty TiLite. It is almost infinitely adjustable within its setup range. Most of the modern sport chairs will likely work. Find the ones that work best with the Twion if there is an issue.

    My TiLite uses an axle pin that is 3/8" shorter than all other pins I have used in the last 37 years due to a non-standard hub diameter. Ordered a proper axle mount (threaded sleeve) and they sent me what I already had.
    The bearing spacing of a wheel's hub is dependent on the manufacturer and model of the wheel. TiLite's axle sleeve is the same length as Invacare/Top End. Quickie has traditionally been the exception. That said, to use a Spinergy everyday hub with the Twion's interface, a spacer is required.


  10. #20
    I’ve had my Apex for six months and I don’t like the amount of twisting and flex it has.

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