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Thread: Quickie Shadow handcycle

  1. #21
    This thread gets me psyched! Good luck with the restore. I have all the old parts off mine if you want them.

    Here's my Shadow I love it. I modified t with a 9 speed disc brake front wheel and 3 ring mountain bike cranks. Used an extra wide downhill bottom bracket with proper spacers so the cranks are centered on the trike rather then being slightly off to the left due to the coaster brake mechanism. Avid mechanical disc brakes and lever make stopping super easy.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Last edited by smity50; 05-13-2019 at 12:06 PM.

  2. #22
    I never had a Quickie SR. Just repaired and rebuilt them for others. The plywood was to make the wider cushion sit flat. Was just a 1/4" or appleboard. We just slid it into the bottom of the cushion.

    Nice upgrades Smity!

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by smity50 View Post
    Here's my Shadow I love it. I modified t with a 9 speed disc brake front wheel and 3 ring mountain bike cranks. Used an extra wide downhill bottom bracket with proper spacers so the cranks are centered on the trike rather then being slightly off to the left due to the coaster brake mechanism. Avid mechanical disc brakes and lever make stopping super easy.
    Hello Smity; welcome to the conversation.
    Man, I like what I see!
    Congratulations on a sharp looking Shadow. That has got to be an inspiring example for those with 'tired' (?) older models.
    The bicycle (or trike), despite all the techno is still a bicycle that performs its function well and that is just grand.
    We owe it all to that person who invented the wheel.

    Thank you for your offer too Smity; appreciated.
    Can you contact me via PM in my profile? Thanks
    Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019 at 05:23 PM.

  4. #24
    Hi DJ.
    Following on from your previous observation on the chain and drives, I checked out chain gauges. Go/no go work well enough as plug gauges so I think that a simple go/no go gauge will do me.
    How do we check the drive chainwheels, with a gauge or experience?
    Quote Originally Posted by djrolling View Post
    Actually with the close up pics the condition of the gears and chainring look good as far as wear I would check the chain and see what wear it had with a tool you have some miles left in the gears and chainring though.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    I never had a Quickie SR. Just repaired and rebuilt them for others. The plywood was to make the wider cushion sit flat. Was just a 1/4" or appleboard. We just slid it into the bottom of the cushion. Nice upgrades Smity!
    That is a thought Patrick. For location I could fashion runners with a slim cushion support that sat inboard of the seat rails. It would eliminate the need to widen the seat frames - time better spent elsewhere on the bike. Thank you

  6. #26
    I like this guys approach to things bike, especially his #8 fencing wire attitude.
    He is no mate of mine but he's not too bad for an Australian

    Plenty of practical videos

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXuWxehSl-s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXKONETx3GA

    His video on wheel building revealed the difference in the build of my Shadow rear wheels - valve stem position.
    Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019 at 04:31 PM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member djrolling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post
    Hi DJ.
    Following on from your previous observation on the chain and drives, I checked out chain gauges. Go/no go work well enough as plug gauges so I think that a simple go/no go gauge will do me.
    How do we check the drive chainwheels, with a gauge or experience?
    I do not know of anything that would gauge the wear of the gears or chain ring. I am not very good about maintenance I have in the past just rode till I wore something out. I have worn a number of chain rings down till they looked like saw blades. I just recently replaced two chain rings the cassette of gears and the chain on my Stricker after about 18000 miles. I am going to do my best to keep tabs on the chain and replace it as it needs to be and the gears and chain ring will last a really long time. So yes just experience but I bet there might be a mileage recommendation. I will have to google that.

  8. #28
    Hi DJ. before heading out for lunch this morning, I gave the chainwheels and wheel hub a treat with kero. The hub chainwheel looks a bit naff as does the chain but I will give them a thorough clean and use them while I get some readies together. On closer inspection it can be seen that the hub chainwheel has been mig welded to the original unit. I will remove it later when a new chain is fitted and make use of the original- ratios being OK, that is.
    I assume it was welded on as a rough n ready change of ratio for the previous /or previous owner. Maybe he or she was a smaller person ( seat back was positioned well forward ).
    I will do some counting and try my hand at working out ratios....

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/attachm...1&d=1557729436
    Last edited by slow_runner; 05-14-2019 at 01:12 AM.

  9. #29
    They put iron chains on and the chainring is pressed. Unless the alignment of the cassette was out, they should be okay. A better quality chain makes a difference.

  10. #30
    Senior Member djrolling's Avatar
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    I want to say the most important thing is just doing as little as you have to right away and get on that bike and ride. With that said I also offer these suggestions.
    I know this is down the road but when you look at upgrading things I would definerly look into getting a set og these to swap out the old grips and this way you can change over to twist shifters for the gears and have the controls right on the pedals including the scraper brake. You might even want to think about these from Top End right now if they are not to pricy. I think you get a better grip and maybe more power. Pat may could speak to the point if they would make a better choice as he has had probably many more cycles and different setups. The reason I point out the ones pictured below is because it has made a big difference having the controls on the handels for me. My first attachment I had to stop pedaling to change gears and also on the Mach 2 changing gears and when I needed extra breaking on the Mach 2 had to grab what I called the parking break so having everything on the pedals is great




    http://www.teamhoc.com/hand-cycle-ac...ycle-grips.php
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