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Thread: Measles?!

  1. #1

    Measles?!

    With all the news about measles going on I was wondering if there was anything about it that could be more dangerous for people with SCI?

    Would it be wise to ask for a booster shot or am I getting caught up in the ado?

  2. #2
    Here is all you need to know, and more than you want to know about the measles.

    A CDC (Center for Disease Control) bulletin:
    https://www.cdc.gov/measles/about/faqs.html

  3. #3
    Did you have the measles (rubeola) as a child? If not, did you have a measles vaccine ever in your life? Measles vaccination was introduced as one of the required/recommended vaccinations for children in 1963. It is 97% effective in preventing measles for your lifetime.

    If you don't know (and your parents are not available to tell you) your provider can do a measles antibody titer serologic test for IgG antibody to determine if you already have immunity. Serologic testing is widely available for measles and rubella IgG antibody. If you have an insufficient titer, you can be immunized as an adult (it won't hurt you to repeat is as an adult if you had it as a child).

    Often now days measles vaccine is combined with mumps and rubella (German measles) in what is commonly called the MMR vaccine or the MMRV vaccine (which include chicken pox or varicella with mumps, measles, and rubella).

    Measles can cause pneumonia in children, so an adult with SCI/D and measles would most likely also be at risk for this.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Did you have the measles (rubeola) as a child? If not, did you have a measles vaccine ever in your life? Measles vaccination was introduced as one of the required/recommended vaccinations for children in 1963. It is 97% effective in preventing measles for your lifetime.

    If you don't know (and your parents are not available to tell you) your provider can do a measles antibody titer serologic test for IgG antibody to determine if you already have immunity. Serologic testing is widely available for measles and rubella IgG antibody. If you have an insufficient titer, you can be immunized as an adult (it won't hurt you to repeat is as an adult if you had it as a child).

    Often now days measles vaccine is combined with mumps and rubella (German measles) in what is commonly called the MMR vaccine or the MMRV vaccine (which include chicken pox or varicella with mumps, measles, and rubella).

    Measles can cause pneumonia in children, so an adult with SCI/D and measles would most likely also be at risk for this.

    (KLD)
    I was born in in 1971 and I and my mom think that I was likely vaccinated. I don't get sick very much (only one bout of mild bronchitis in 28+ years, Knock Wood) but I will ask my NP to see what she thinks. I wouldn't worry about it but one of my caregivers has young kids and runs the risk of coming into contact with anti-vaxer children.

    Thanks for the info...

  5. #5
    Very likely you were required to be vaccinated with MMR or MMRV in order to attend public school in most states.

    I'm so old that I had all these infectious diseases before there were vaccines for them: Had measles when I was 4, chicken pox when I was 5, mumps when I was 7, and German measles (rubella) when I was 12. The only vaccines I got as a child were polio and small pox.

    While you are looking into your vaccine history, it is also important to get vaccines that you should get as an adult, which includes hepatitis A and B, pneumonia, and DPT (diptheria, pertussis or whooping cough, and tetatus). The latter is needed every 10 years for your lifetime. Shingles is also strongly recommended for those over 60 yo. Of course flu immunization annually in early fall is strongly recommended for everyone, but especially for those with neurologic disabilities that effect breathing (such as SCI/D).

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    I had chicken pox at 5... I get my flu and pneumonia shots and recently got the hep A last year. I'll be sure to mention the others by my NP as well.

    Thanks...

  7. #7
    As you get older, you will have to understand if or when you had measles because you will need to get the shingles vaccine.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    As you get older, you will have to understand if or when you had measles because you will need to get the shingles vaccine.
    I know that I've never had measles but I am fairly certain that I had the measles vaccination.

    Thanks...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    As you get older, you will have to understand if or when you had measles because you will need to get the shingles vaccine.
    Shingles is from the same virus that causes chicken pox, not measles. You are more at risk for developing shingles as you get older if you had chicken pox as a child, but the vaccine for chicken pox does not protect you from shingles. Many people who were not vaccinated for chicken pox as a child had a mild case of chicken pox and didn't even know it. There is no relationship between shingles and measles though.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Shingles is from the same virus that causes chicken pox, not measles. You are more at risk for developing shingles as you get older if you had chicken pox as a child, but the vaccine for chicken pox does not protect you from shingles. Many people who were not vaccinated for chicken pox as a child had a mild case of chicken pox and didn't even know it. There is no relationship between shingles and measles though.

    (KLD)
    Thanks for the correction.

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