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Thread: Insurance and wheels

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad09 View Post
    If you're working, have you looked into your local vocational rehab services? Voc rehab has always covered everything above what my insurance pays for (spinergy wheels, carbon fiber backrest/seat pan/side guards, etc.) Also, you mentioned both glide suspension forks as well as frog legs. I know from experience the glide suspension forks have a substantially larger offset as far as where the caster is in relation to the fork stem bolt, than frog legs do. So the area they take to swivel is a much larger footprint. Still probably not enough to interfere with your rear wheels though.
    voc rehab from the state I used to live in has given me over $100,000 worth of equipment and tuition assistance for school, so I agree that it is a very valuable resource. But I now have a decent job and some money saved up so I can afford whatever insurance doesn’t cover (but obviously I want to get them to cover as much as I possibly can) and even if I couldn’t I don’t think I qualify for voc rehab any longer because I’m employed and not on SSD or SSDI

  2. #12
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    yeah I too assumed the casters could be interfering with the footrest or the area where my feet go because of the width, but one of the solutions they offered was lengthening the frame by 2 inches which wouldnt change that distance at all.

    If you haven't already, I'd get a copy of the exact order form they sent in and the CAD drawing. Hard to trust a DME, entirely. So many are so dumb. I found several careless mistakes on my order form, which would have led to much whinging from me has the time come to get the chair and I'd not triple checked everything the DumbME had done.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    If you haven't already, I'd get a copy of the exact order form they sent in and the CAD drawing. Hard to trust a DME, entirely. So many are so dumb. I found several careless mistakes on my order form, which would have led to much whinging from me has the time come to get the chair and I'd not triple checked everything the DumbME had done.
    Do they still do CAD drawings?

    I seem to remember people on here saying they were told it just isn't possible any more (or there is a charge for it or something). My last DME (who I just switched from) had multiple mistakes on their order form, so I plan to do this, but I don't think I'm there just yet.

  4. #14
    They still make CAD drawings. The first one is free. The second one costs $75. I found mistakes on not only the order form but also the CAD. They don't seem to have very good quality control.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    yeah I too assumed the casters could be interfering with the footrest or the area where my feet go because of the width, but one of the solutions they offered was lengthening the frame by 2 inches which wouldnt change that distance at all.
    Now that I think of it some more, the caster interference with my shoes was on a Quickie not a TiLite. They have different designs.

    Regardless, you are right that adding 2" to the frame length won't do anything about this. More likely is that the 13" width may be compromising stability and adding 2" to the frame length will compensate for that. You may want to consider making the chair 1" wider rather than 2" longer. But then again, it may be fine without doing either. That's why you need the CAD drawing. They have to make the CAD to determine the stability. There will be a note on the CAD if it fails their stability requirements. If lateral stability is a problem another option may be to locate the caster tubes further out laterally. That will widen the footprint without widening or lengthening the frame. However, if the caster tubes are located further out laterally than the wheels, then that defeats the purpose of clearing narrow doorways. Plus it will look weird. If you have a similar chair without stability issues, then you should tell them that. After all, real life experience matters more than design analysis. Either way, getting the CAD is a good idea.

  6. #16
    For a Tilite, I always add 1" to the frame to get a better grip on the frame when transferring.2" is a lot depending on front frame angle. You want approx. 2 finger space between back of knees and front of seat. Yep, a CAD is a must for me. They rarely get it right so good to see the specs drawn out.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    voc rehab from the state I used to live in has given me over $100,000 worth of equipment and tuition assistance for school, so I agree that it is a very valuable resource. But I now have a decent job and some money saved up so I can afford whatever insurance doesn’t cover (but obviously I want to get them to cover as much as I possibly can) and even if I couldn’t I don’t think I qualify for voc rehab any longer because I’m employed and not on SSD or SSDI
    I'm employed and not on SSD or SSDI and I qualify for voc rehab. Not sure what the requirements are actually. You may want to check just in case.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Yeah, they still do it. One freebie. If your DME has sent an order form, it's safe to assume they got a CaD response with notes on the concerns in the margin. That is how mine came.

    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Do they still do CAD drawings?

    I seem to remember people on here saying they were told it just isn't possible any more (or there is a charge for it or something). My last DME (who I just switched from) had multiple mistakes on their order form, so I plan to do this, but I don't think I'm there just yet.
    Last edited by Oddity; 04-17-2019 at 03:05 PM.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Do they still do CAD drawings?

    I seem to remember people on here saying they were told it just isn't possible any more (or there is a charge for it or something). My last DME (who I just switched from) had multiple mistakes on their order form, so I plan to do this, but I don't think I'm there just yet.
    As others have already said, yes they still generate CAD drawings. Many DMEs don't share them with the customer which makes no sense. At Bike-On, we require that our customers approve the CAD as it protects all the parties involved. It also facilitates the collaborative process of spec'ing a new chair.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    For a Tilite, I always add 1" to the frame to get a better grip on the frame when transferring.2" is a lot depending on front frame angle. You want approx. 2 finger space between back of knees and front of seat. Yep, a CAD is a must for me. They rarely get it right so good to see the specs drawn out.
    TiLite makes frame depth 1-1/2" greater than seat depth by default. Their order form provides the option of frame depth = seat depth. But when I spec it that way they resist. Ultimately, I got around it by specing seat depth 1-1/2" shorter. The frame ends up the same either way. The only difference is shorter seat upholstery. Go figure. Sometimes I wonder who is looking at these and making these calls.

    This matters to me because my knee tends to get caught under the front angle bend when transferring into the chair. Making frame depth = seat depth eliminates this knee trap.
    Last edited by August West; 04-17-2019 at 04:13 PM.

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