Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Is this a pressure ulcer on my right ankle?

  1. #1

    Is this a pressure ulcer on my right ankle?

    I've never had a pressure ulcer so i'm unsure if this is one or not? I'm unsure because i have a blister on it which i hope is visible in the picture?

    Thanks in advance for offering insight/advice.

    dan
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    466
    I vote yes.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Warsaw, Poland
    Posts
    27
    Does the red area near the blister blanch? I think friction caused this pressure sore, maybe you wear too tight shoes or something.

  4. #4
    Good question, i forgot to mention it passes the blanching test...quckly restores the normal color when pressed = blood flow is great.
    Other intel, i'm T3/4 Para complete, been SCI since 1983.
    One of my main misunderstanding is would a pressure ulcer typically start with a blister?

  5. #5
    It does look like a pressure injury. Because the skin is not broken, this would be classified as an "unable to stage" pressure injury.

    Very important in this area to catch and management early, as the bone is so close to the surface. If this wound opens (blister breaks) it can allow bacteria to get into the bone very easily. Main way to treat this is to prevent the blister from breaking (don't let it rub against anything or get hit when transferring, for example) and keep all pressure off it entirely. This may mean no wearing shoes that cover that area. Do you wear a night boot in bed? Be sure that there is absolutely no pressure on that area in bed. These pressure injuries in this area are most often from laying on your side without sufficient padding on the ankle, or from shoes that rubbed.

    Keep it covered with a light sterile dressing so that if the blister does pop, the area will be kept clean.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    Thanks KLD and others for the input. I will treat this as though it is a pressure ulcer even though the blood flow does not support that idea but perhaps that's an indicater utilized in later stages?

    I can rule out shoes and socks, i wear lose fitting, thin comfortable socks (not compressions socks) and ankles are well clear of the shoes edge. So i will shift my focus to ensuring i relieve pressure in bed. I have noticed that after so many SCI years my legs do lay flat agains the ankles when i'm on my back...that was not so until the last couple years (SCI ageing i suppose).

    Does this look like a good solution?


  7. #7
    Yes, that is called "bridging" and is a good way to remove all pressure. I would avoid having the pillow be quite that high though, as the more you elevate the leg, the more pressure is transferred to your sacrum; you don't want to break down there too.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  8. #8
    Just my two....Short history, diabetic, genetics causing ingrown toenails, poor circulation(to bad that can't have nails permanently destroyed), usually end up having it done every year and of course decreased sensation.
    Bilateral partial nail avulsion on Ingrown great toes, first great toe was Feb then two weeks between procedures.
    First one no problem but second toe on next morning had blister at area change from toe to forefoot. Think was dressing on great toe rubbed cause left compression stocking off or open toe Velcro closure slipper wear when ingrown nail done was to loose and may rubbed there while up in chair and didn't know it.
    Unroofed blister, thought was a piece of Fibracol(collagen dressing used to fill in nailbed that absorbs drainage speeds up healing). Figured no big deal cause had small blisters on toes before but not as wet or big.
    Back to podiatrist for followup next week. Blister area dry but was still swallow wound started using Polymem to finish healing.
    March was long month but this am it's dry and skin still filling in but is dry and peeling at edges.
    This been a booger, alot longer than any previous blisters taken to heal! Maybe my age cause they done the circulation, pressure and x-rays before nail procedures, no big changes in tests.
    IMHO: If not already done would get treatment team to check that out.

  9. #9
    I developed a similar blister on my ankle during a hospital stay. It was NL who spotted it and asked the hospitalist, "how are you going to treat this."

    The nurses used various bolsters depending if I was on my back or side, paid more attention to positioning while turning, and used Mepilex dressings. Mepilex dressings come in many different sizes, shapes, and levels of absorbency. In the case of the blister, that had not yet opened up (no exudate), they used Mepilex Border Lite. The dressing is sterile, has a supple border of adhesive on all four sides of the square dressing, and has a light padding to protect the area from friction. The light pad has a very little bit of self adhesive that doesn't stick to the injury area, but does prevent shifting and bunching.

    This is the website. You will be asked if you are a medical professional...just click yes and you will be redirected to pages of information about Mepilex dressings. They are pricey, but I don't think you will need more than the 2 or 3 inch squares for the area of your injury. Mepilex can be purchased at Amazon or just about any of the on line medical stores.

  10. #10
    Thanks GJ/Mike and KLD! This is a fantastic resource for us SCI folks, often better info than we can get from local medical professionals given their limited exposure to us SCI mutants!

    I just ordered some Mepilex squares. And i'm working on finding a suitable wedge as a long term fix/prevention. As KLD pointed out too much elevation and we just transfer a lof of pressure to the sarcral. Interim i used a memory foam pillow and it worked very well - zero pressure on the ankles with my feet elevated by the pillow.

    I had actually previoulsy sought advice from my Wound Care doc and he told me there was no options availble that can entirely relieve pressure and i should try rubbing my ankles with Ucerin. So i had been using ankle pillows and ucerin to try and avoid a break down...

    So GJ looks like you can confirm a blister can be the start of a pressure ulcer? Also, what was your recovery time? Any reocurrences?
    Last edited by crispy1981; 04-02-2019 at 12:20 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. pressure ulcer
    By pacera1117 in forum Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-30-2016, 08:03 PM
  2. Pressure Sore on Ankle
    By Nowhere Man in forum Care
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-20-2014, 11:05 PM
  3. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-23-2012, 03:44 PM
  4. ankle pressure sore
    By quarterhorse in forum Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-18-2008, 05:36 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-06-2001, 12:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •