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Thread: Correlation between sensation and movement

  1. #1

    Correlation between sensation and movement

    Are there any studies about incomplete injuries and if you have any type of sensation at your legs, what the percentage of those individuals also have movement? Is there a correlation, or is there zero connection there?

  2. #2
    • A = Complete: No motor or sensory function is preserved in the S4-S5 sacral segments
    • B = Incomplete: Sensory function but not motor function is preserved below the neurological level and includes the S4-S5 sacral segments.
    • C = Incomplete: Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and more than half of key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade less than 3.
    • D = Incomplete: Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and at least half of key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade of 3 or more.
    • E = Normal: Motor and sensory function are normal.

    Neurologic level at hospital discharge:

    30.1% incomplete quadriplegia (tetraplegia)
    25.6% complete paraplegia
    20.4% complete quadriplegia (tetraplegia)
    18.4 % incomplete paraplegia.

    https://www.brainandspinalcord.org/s...ry-statistics/

    I'm not sure if you're asking about the statistics in each category (B vs. C) or if your question is about the nature of the injury?


    Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries

    Incomplete spinal cord injuries are more common than complete injuries, and are characterized by some degree of sensation and movement below the point of injury. The extent of an incomplete injury is generally determined after spinal shock has subsided, approximately six or eight weeks post injury. Incomplete spinal injuries can result in some feeling but little or no movement, or in some movement but little or no feeling. Incomplete spinal injuries fall under five different classifications:

    • Anterior cord syndrome: characterized by damage to the front of the spinal cord, resulting in impaired temperature, touch, and pain sensations below the point of injury. Some movement can later be recovered.
    • Central cord syndrome: characterized by damage in the center of the spinal cord that results in loss of function in the arms but some leg movement. Some recovery is possible.
    • Posterior cord syndrome: characterized by damage to the back of the spinal cord, resulting in good muscle power, pain, and temperature sensation, but poor coordination.
    • Brown-Sequard syndrome: characterized by damage to one side of the spinal cord, resulting in impaired loss of movement but preserved sensation on one side of the body, and preserved movement and loss of sensation on the other side of the body.
    • Cauda equina lesion: characterized by injury to the nerves located between the first and second lumbar region of the spine, resulting in partial or complete loss of sensation. In some cases, nerves regrow and function is recovered.

    https://www.brainandspinalcord.org/s...jury-recovery/

  3. #3
    Hi Grammy,

    thanks for sharing the below. I am aware of the information, I guess my question is a data collection one. For example, how many percentage individuals that are incomplete have sensation and motor, vs just sensation vs just motor.

    ill tell you why I?m asking and maybe that provides more information. My son is 3.5 years old and we just discovered he has some type of sensation on his thighs...this seems new to us - he is 3 years post injury but you can?t exactly ask a 6 months old this stuff. So I was wondering statistically speaking what the odds are if he has sensation that he has movement below injury. I know every case is unique but I?m looking at the overview of SCI.

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    • A = Complete: No motor or sensory function is preserved in the S4-S5 sacral segments
    • B = Incomplete: Sensory function but not motor function is preserved below the neurological level and includes the S4-S5 sacral segments.
    • C = Incomplete: Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and more than half of key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade less than 3.
    • D = Incomplete: Motor function is preserved below the neurological level, and at least half of key muscles below the neurological level have a muscle grade of 3 or more.
    • E = Normal: Motor and sensory function are normal.

    Neurologic level at hospital discharge:

    30.1% incomplete quadriplegia (tetraplegia)
    25.6% complete paraplegia
    20.4% complete quadriplegia (tetraplegia)
    18.4 % incomplete paraplegia.

    https://www.brainandspinalcord.org/s...ry-statistics/

    I'm not sure if you're asking about the statistics in each category (B vs. C) or if your question is about the nature of the injury?


    Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries

    Incomplete spinal cord injuries are more common than complete injuries, and are characterized by some degree of sensation and movement below the point of injury. The extent of an incomplete injury is generally determined after spinal shock has subsided, approximately six or eight weeks post injury. Incomplete spinal injuries can result in some feeling but little or no movement, or in some movement but little or no feeling. Incomplete spinal injuries fall under five different classifications:

    • Anterior cord syndrome: characterized by damage to the front of the spinal cord, resulting in impaired temperature, touch, and pain sensations below the point of injury. Some movement can later be recovered.
    • Central cord syndrome: characterized by damage in the center of the spinal cord that results in loss of function in the arms but some leg movement. Some recovery is possible.
    • Posterior cord syndrome: characterized by damage to the back of the spinal cord, resulting in good muscle power, pain, and temperature sensation, but poor coordination.
    • Brown-Sequard syndrome: characterized by damage to one side of the spinal cord, resulting in impaired loss of movement but preserved sensation on one side of the body, and preserved movement and loss of sensation on the other side of the body.
    • Cauda equina lesion: characterized by injury to the nerves located between the first and second lumbar region of the spine, resulting in partial or complete loss of sensation. In some cases, nerves regrow and function is recovered.

    https://www.brainandspinalcord.org/s...jury-recovery/

  4. #4
    I don't think that statistically there is any correlation. Given the time post injury or your son, I would guess that any sensation and
    motor return would have occurred. That being said there is no such thing as never in this SCI world.

    I am sorry not to be more helpful.

    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    I think sensation and movement is different "pathway". Not sure whats the scientific name is. I heard some injuries can have preserved movement but loss of sensation. I have mild sensation below the injury level, and can only move my left big toe. Only the the divine one will know what will be recover. Think Grammy can provide a better answer.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by MomNoah View Post
    Hi Grammy,

    thanks for sharing the below. I am aware of the information, I guess my question is a data collection one. For example, how many percentage individuals that are incomplete have sensation and motor, vs just sensation vs just motor.

    ill tell you why I?m asking and maybe that provides more information. My son is 3.5 years old and we just discovered he has some type of sensation on his thighs...this seems new to us - he is 3 years post injury but you can?t exactly ask a 6 months old this stuff. So I was wondering statistically speaking what the odds are if he has sensation that he has movement below injury. I know every case is unique but I?m looking at the overview of SCI.
    Ok, thanks for the clarification. I understand the statistic you're looking for. I've been looking through the public databases for information but haven't found anything close to tracking the statistic. I'm not sure it's even been asked when they're gathering the information from patients. Such information may be available in a private database I don't have access to or at SCI Rehab Hospitals. I'll continue to look around to see if there is any publications or papers that mention it. Good luck to you and your little guy!

  7. #7
    All I know is that I was almost completely paralyzed with no feeling below shoulders at first and after my folks rubbed my limbs for an hour every day for weeks I regained sensation and movement that got better in time....

  8. #8
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    NW NJ ***********T12 cmplt since 95
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    Nominally T12/L1 complete, I have sensation on the outside upper sides of my thighs but no motor control.
    69yo male T12 complete since 1995
    NW NJ

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