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Thread: MRI : What do you know about mri machines ? magnetic resonance imaging

  1. #1
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    MRI : What do you know about mri machines ? magnetic resonance imaging

    I'm having way more MRI's than I ever imagined I would. and to be honest they don't seem to throw out any great clues as to what is causing my pain.


    I'm about to get another MRI today! and I always go to the same place and same the same machine, it occurs to me it's quite an old machine, I'll find out exactly how old and what it's Specification is today.
    2006 Siemens hardware: 1.5T : software was updated August 2018.

    So question to those that know about these things.... MRI connoisseurs as it were .. does anyone else check the MRI machine before they get an appointment, or select an MRI provider based on the machine?

    and if you do what do you look for? I'm primarily interested in the best machine for diagnostics of the spine and not comfort.

    At this point, all I know is the machines are rated in (T's) Tesla's.

    My googling shows the FDA as approved machines range from 1T - 7T in the USA.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07182-7

    Google map of all the locations of 7T MRI machines in the world... as of 20 Oct 2017 - https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/ed...125873%2C0&z=2

    thoughts ?

    Other thoughts are what T's implanted devices are rated for.. pain pumps, neurological stim units etc.

    https://www.ajpb.com/news/implanted-...njury-from-mri

    https://www.massdevice.com/flowonix-...lantable-pump/




    Last edited by NW-Will; 02-17-2019 at 11:44 PM.

  2. #2
    Sorry, can't help you on this one. Don't know that much about the different generations of MRI machines.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
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    Our son has had 6 or 12 monthly MRIs since 2007. Up until last year, the only paediatric hospital within 1500km of us has had a 1.5T MRI machine. The new paediatric hospital opened last year, and it has a 3T machine. The difference in images is significant...like watching an HD TV channel compared to an SD channel. In fact it has caused some concern with my son’s recent imaging, with the MRI report suggesting there may be some change in the remains of our son’s tumour, but they are comparing images with greatly differing quality. (We aren’t too concerned as we send all the MRI images to Johns Hopkins, who took 3T images when we took our son there for radiotherapy 7 years ago, and they say that the tumour is still stable).

    So, in our situation, we would definitely want the 3T versus the 1.5T. But whether even higher Ts would benefit or not, I am not sure.
    Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

  4. #4
    We are using Diffusion tensor imaging in our trial- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffus...tensor_imaging

  5. #5
    My doctor said that hospitals have the best MRIs. They even have 3D ultrasound. They need the best for surgery whereas outpatient radiology is more routine.

  6. #6
    There are also open upright MRI machines in many locations. I remember my physiatrist saying that upright MRIs are superior for spine and cord issues because they image the body as it really is under the pressure of gravity, with no masking of compression that can happen with a supine position. If you Google "upright MRI," there's a raft of photos and info. Then there are functional MRI machines (fMRI) that image the body as it performs certain tasks. It's hard for hospitals to keep up with - or afford - the newest technologies.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  7. #7
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    I go to the local hospital for the MRI and it's 1.5T

    I guess we should be looking for a minimum of a 3T.

    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    My doctor said that hospitals have the best MRIs. They even have 3D ultrasound. They need the best for surgery whereas outpatient radiology is more routine.

  8. #8
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Yeah .. not sure how I'm expected to stand up for an MRI! If I could standup probably wouldn't need and MRI

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    There are also open upright MRI machines in many locations. I remember my physiatrist saying that upright MRIs are superior for spine and cord issues because they image the body as it really is under the pressure of gravity, with no masking of compression that can happen with a supine position. If you Google "upright MRI," there's a raft of photos and info. Then there are functional MRI machines (fMRI) that image the body as it performs certain tasks. It's hard for hospitals to keep up with - or afford - the newest technologies.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    Yeah .. not sure how I'm expected to stand up for an MRI! If I could standup probably wouldn't need and MRI
    FONAR UPRIGHT MRI: http://www.fonar.com/standup.htm

    (KLD)
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    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    Yeah .. not sure how I'm expected to stand up for an MRI! If I could standup probably wouldn't need and MRI
    It was just an example of the kinds of technology available now - obviously not suited to everyone. But as KLD's pictures show, you could do this one.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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