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Thread: transferring to dental chair

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    A long slide board (like used for getting in/out of a car) can be helpful for these types of transfers. Keep in mind that your dentist is under an ADA mandated obligation to find a way to transfer you into the chair or have other equipment modifications available so that you can be provided the same level of care as an AB patient. This may mean getting a different style/model of dental chair installed.

    At the dental clinic at the VA hospital where I worked, we installed ceiling tract lifts into several of the dental clinic rooms, and also were evaluating one of these systems which can allow you to remain in your manual or power wheelchair (once the dental chair is removed):



    (KLD)
    Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.

    If anyone knows of wheelchair friendly dentist @ the Modesto, Ca. area please let me know.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.

    If anyone knows of wheelchair friendly dentist @ the Modesto, Ca. area please let me know.
    Yeah! Threatening your dentist doesn't sound like a good idea. Which reminds me of a joke I've heard.

    Mrs. Jones goes into her dentist's office and sits down in the exam chair. Dentist comes in and greets her, chair side, "Good morning Mrs. Jones." Mrs. Jones reaches out and grabs the dentist's "boys" and says, Good morning Dr. Smith, we aren't going to hurt each other are we."

    When I got my tilt/recline chair with power rise, I went in to my dentist's office and showed him and the hygienists how the features worked. That is when they decided it was no problem to work on me while I stayed in my chair.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    my caregive and dentist did a 2 man lift no biggey

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.
    Who said anything about threatening them? You should though, advocate for yourself, and for others with similar needs, by educating the dentist about the fairly new (2010) ADA requirements for health care facilities and offices. The ADA is only enforced by people with disabilities doing this. Show the dentist and their office manager the ADA standards, and ask about what they are doing to meet them. If they show no interest or rebuff you, then you can file a DOJ ADA complaint. Let them know that you would rather do this with them then have to take that next step:

    https://www.ada.gov/medcare_mobility_ta/medcare_ta.htm

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #15
    KLD, thank you for that link. I had no idea that health care professionals had to provide this level of accessibility - by law - for people with disabilities. I don't know of a single medical facility in my town that comes close to meeting these requirements, not even the hospital. Doctors' (especially dentists') offices are so small that there's no turning radius for chairs or rollators, so semi-ambulatory patients must default to crutches and hope for the best. Scales, exam tables and dental chairs might as well be small mountains. At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.
    Yes, good point, Bonnette. The horns of a dilemma. When to advocate for yourself and everyone who is in the same space or when to keep silent and just get the services you need without making waves, especially when you don't live in an area with abundant choices of care. Sad as that is to recognize, it is reality for many.
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 02-16-2019 at 12:43 PM. Reason: fix quote

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    My dentist and the hygienists can work on my teeth while I remain in my power chair with tilt/recline. I pull into the exam room and park the chair parallel with the regular exam chair.
    Do you find the chair jiggles and moves? I have tilt/recline as well, but it's not nearly as stable as a dentist's chair, not even close. I could handle a hygienist maybe but I would be very worried about a tooth procedure like a filling or extraction.

  8. #18
    I've got one of these https://www.promove.uk.com/promove-s...d-individuals/ easy to use and take with you. Needs up to 4 people but can be only 2 if you are light. I always take it if I am travelling and staying in hotels just in case of emergency and a quick transfer being needed

  9. #19
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    What are these dentists you speak of?!

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    KLD, thank you for that link. I had no idea that health care professionals had to provide this level of accessibility - by law - for people with disabilities. I don't know of a single medical facility in my town that comes close to meeting these requirements, not even the hospital. Doctors' (especially dentists') offices are so small that there's no turning radius for chairs or rollators, so semi-ambulatory patients must default to crutches and hope for the best. Scales, exam tables and dental chairs might as well be small mountains. At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.

    I feel this situation does not need threats or anger, but business-like conversation with the dentist or office manager. Just thinking about what one would do if they went to McDonalds and ordered a Big Mac and was given a fish sandwich.....you could just eat the fish sandwich or point out that you expected a correct order.
    I have gone to a very small dental office for about 30 years. Once I began to have trouble transferring, I asked for help and they gave it to me. I always bring my transfer board (polished with Pledge to make it more slippery), but can no longer lift my legs onto the chair.
    It's so important to have a discussion with the dentist. He/She will not kick you to the curb. They want your business.

    Nice to see that SCI55years has provided information about dental work at home.

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