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Thread: As an SCI in a manual chair that transfers which 2019 vehicle would you go for or not

  1. #11
    Breaking down and dragging a big steel chair into a vehicle was a non-starter for me, so I've used a converted van since I got out of rehab 27 years ago. But this video had me thinking about a minivan: https://youtu.be/8S2KX7L3vZo. I'd have to get a titanium chair and turn back the clock on my shoulders as they are steadily going away.

    On another note, Dr. Strangelove premiered on this date 55 years ago. That's for you, Andy......
    Last edited by Sit-N-Fly; 01-29-2019 at 11:43 AM.

  2. #12
    I have a 2018 Ford Transit. I transfer over w 1 foot inside, right hand on seat, left hand above on grab handle. Then I can roll/lift my chair in feet first behind me (1 middle chair removed). There’s no auto close doors so I use momentum to close the door. I love it since I don’t need lift/s or breakdown of chair but it’s not the most comfy or smooth ride. The model is made as a commuter/work car. Back row seat has almost 0 foot room. Fits 3 adults 2 kids with chair.

  3. #13
    I'm curious too about the sidewalk transfers. I only ever transfer from a vehicle to a sidewalk when I'm taking a taxi, and if it's a hassle, I can always have them drop me off somewhere without a curb. Can't really picture the situation where I'd need to transfer onto a sidewalk since one has to park on the right side of the road when parking on the street and the driver's door is on the left. I can come up with some situations where you might have to transfer from a curb to the car (if someone blocked your driver's side door and your right door was against a curb), but can't think of how it would happen the other way around.

    Do yall drive on the wrong side of the road up in Vancouver?

  4. #14
    That tool he used is a "hay hook" for grabbing hay bales. First time i have seen that particular use!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sit-N-Fly View Post
    Breaking down and dragging a big steel chair into a vehicle was a non-starter for me, so I've used a converted van since I got out of rehab 27 years ago. But this video had me thinking about a minivan: https://youtu.be/8S2KX7L3vZo. I'd have to get a titanium chair and turn back the clock on my shoulders as they are steadily going away.

    On another note, Dr. Strangelove premiered on this date 55 years ago. That's for you, Andy......

  5. #15
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    When I had to get a new-to-me vehicle I went to dealerships, several per day, and tested transferring and loading, unloading my chair. Funny thing is I ended up with another Chevy because their frame base has stayed the same for many years and it happens to suit me and my 16 inch chair. I preferred the 2002Cavalier as it was larger than the 2014 Sonnet I have now, but it still works for me and was not expensive.

  6. #16
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    The 2 most common.
    Are if I'm riding shotgun as the passenger in the car.
    Or if getting out into traffic at night sucks, so I transfer to the passenger seat and get out curbside.

    Yeah I have no issue parking against traffic, and will transfer from the driverside straight to the sidewalk.

    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    I'm curious too about the sidewalk transfers. I only ever transfer from a vehicle to a sidewalk when I'm taking a taxi, and if it's a hassle, I can always have them drop me off somewhere without a curb. Can't really picture the situation where I'd need to transfer onto a sidewalk since one has to park on the right side of the road when parking on the street and the driver's door is on the left. I can come up with some situations where you might have to transfer from a curb to the car (if someone blocked your driver's side door and your right door was against a curb), but can't think of how it would happen the other way around.

    Do yall drive on the wrong side of the road up in Vancouver?

  7. #17
    I have been using a 2014 GMC Acadia for 2 years. Used it in Minnesota and drove it down to Florida 6 months ago with a unadulterated on the back. It is a little bigger than a CRV but may meet your requirements except the transfer from driver to passenger and column gear shift. I use a power chair most of the time and was able to have a lift installed in the trunk. Not the easiest process but financially necessary, important part to that is I can fit a power wheelchair and a lift in the back.

  8. #18
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    Hi Will,

    We recently did some car shopping and have some similar requirements. Ended up with another Toyota van from Performance Mobility (changed their name recently) Anyway, love the van but my wife also drives a 2014 Subaru Outback. I find the Outback to be wonderfully easy car to transfer into or out of. We live in Bend so the all wheel drive system is great and the dang thing gets great gas milage with the 2.5i engine. My wheel chair does however lay on its side. My wife lifts it into the Subaru and finds it easier to lift sideways than upright. You may also look at the Subaru Forester as it is slightly taller inside the cargo area. (we also own a Toyota Tacoma and as much as I love the thing, it is a bitch to get into)

    Jim

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    Being pragmatic it's looking like a mini-van at this point!
    A full size van may be even more pragmatic. I just bought a van because I want to spare my shoulders. I ruled out the minivan because of the ramp. If the objective is to be kind to the shoulders, then the ramp solution falls short.

    Drawbacks of a minivan include:

    1. inconvenience - how convenient is it to deal with a bag of groceries up a ramp or to access the ramp on an incline?
    2. cost - the minivan conversion is much more expensive because of the kneeling system.
    3. maintenance - You can service the lift in your own garage. You can't service the kneeling system.
    4. reliability - more parts and more complexity = less reliability.
    5. portability - they modify the floor and suspension for the kneeling system. Hence, it is part of the minivan. If you get into an accident (or need a new vehicle for any other reason), you will have to pay for another ramp and kneeling system in the minivan. The lift can be removed and installed in a new van.
    6. performance - I prefer the ride of a 25 year old Ford Econoline over that of a 5 year old Chrysler Town and Country.

    Advantages of a minivan include:

    1. one person can deploy the ramp manually in case of failure,
    2. better gas mileage, and
    3. it's smaller which enables accessing garages with low ceilings plus it's less expensive to wash (a full size van costs 2x more to wash).

    For me, the winner is the full-size van.

  10. #20
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Never seen a lift like this.. .plus I am kind of digging the Mercedes metris vans..

    anyone seen or tried this lift ? verdict ?

    anyone have a metris van ?


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