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Thread: UCSD Scientists Demonstrate Use of 3D Printing with Stem Cells

  1. #31
    This lab has years of work behind it in identifying and using nerve growth factors in spinal cord injured rats. There is also a huge amount of previous research at many research groups indicating that the use of tissue scaffolds such as Schwann cells may have significant value to routing the sprouting axons into the right location and past scar tissue. This study is the next step in these lines of research.

    It is most unlikely that only one intervention will be needed to regrow/heal spinal cord damage. One presentation I saw at ASIA several years ago predicted that a combination of at least 6 different interventions would ultimately be needed. One of the major challenges is in determining in what combination, what order, and what dose.

    (KLD)
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  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    This lab has years of work behind it in identifying and using nerve growth factors in spinal cord injured rats. There is also a huge amount of previous research at many research groups indicating that the use of tissue scaffolds such as Schwann cells may have significant value to routing the sprouting axons into the right location and past scar tissue. This study is the next step in these lines of research.

    It is most unlikely that only one intervention will be needed to regrow/heal spinal cord damage. One presentation I saw at ASIA several years ago predicted that a combination of at least 6 different interventions would ultimately be needed. One of the major challenges is in determining in what combination, what order, and what dose.

    (KLD)
    Thank you SCI Nurse! A couple years ago I watched a presentation by Dr. Tuszynski where he explained that different neural cells require a different domain to perform in various areas and layers of the cord at different levels. What worked in a lower injury really well wouldn't perform in a higher injury. It was fascinating but it definitely complicates the cell selection depending on where the lesion is located and which domain the transplant will be taking place in. Awhile later, the paper was published explaining their findings. I believe this is the paper LINK: Injured adult motor and sensory axons regenerate into appropriate organotypic domains of neural progenitor grafts.

    I believe when the scaffolds are marketed in the future, they may well contain a bit different cell depending on the location of the lesion and what specifically the target is (sensory or motor). Years ago, we were just trying to sort the performance and differences in types of stem cells. Now we find each cell type has it's own specific location preference and partner cells. I doubt there is a one cell fits all solution as previously believed and trialed. The early stem cell trials for SCI may have been quite premature according to Dr. Tuszynski with what we're finding out now in the SCI stem cell studies. Their early studies also contained a cocktail of about a dozen different growth factors. Now they are down to around four that will work just as well as the dozen used to. It's progress in the making.


  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe View Post
    Back to the original topic by SCI Nurse, I see reality in 3D printing cell matching organs for transplanting, but only the ones that do heal such as skin tissue, heart, ear, lungs, nose, eyes....these were allready transplanted by organ donors way before 3D printing... Spinal cord tissue if different, it may be 3D printed but then what.... how to insert unhealable tissue or 'scaforld' without further damaging the existing one? just one nerve fiber disruption can paralyse the rest of the body. Makes more sense to me if just using the growth syrop alone to the existing cord to repair itseft
    The way the spinal cord works is dynamic, so new connections can be made. It's more like digging tunnels and building bridges to get around a car crash blocking the road, rather than removing the crash.
    Kate Willette's book is really good and explained a lot of these things to me - https://www.christopherreeve.org/liv...al-cord-injury

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by niallel View Post
    The way the spinal cord works is dynamic, so new connections can be made. It's more like digging tunnels and building bridges to get around a car crash blocking the road, rather than removing the crash.
    Kate Willette's book is really good and explained a lot of these things to me - https://www.christopherreeve.org/liv...al-cord-injury
    That is a good information source. It dispels the notion that one broken axon causes the entire body to be paralyzed or that growth factors put on a spinal cord makes it repair itself.

    Science has come a long way and today we know that microsurgery and super-microsurgery is a real thing and being used every day throughout the world. If you haven't seen it, check out a few of the uploaded video on You-Tube.

    For SCI, the researchers are implanting tiny two millimeter scaffolds with cells into rats and observing recovery. (The channels inside the rat scaffold is 2 micro-millimeters or about the thickness of two hair strands for the axons to grow in). They are moving on with larger animal studies and tweaking proteins in the scaffold with anticipation of human trials. They've even made a model of a human lesion with an MRI scan. That model 4 centimeter scaffold (about 1.5 inches) takes 10 minutes to print out. They're getting vascularisation (blood flow and developed capillaries) inside the scaffolds.

    Now that's some impressive use of amazing scientific research, sophisticated equipment and dedicated manpower moving along right there. I hope they have a lot of future success.

  5. #35
    Grammy, thank you so much for all your explanation on this subject. You are giving us valuable information.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by scimike View Post
    Grammy, thank you so much for all your explanation on this subject. You are giving us valuable information.
    You're sure welcome scimike. I'm wishing you well.

  7. #37
    Senior Member kate's Avatar
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    Thank you, Niallel! I wrote a column for New Mobility about this 3D scaffold + growth factors + neural stem cells combination ... I think it will be in the July issue.

    There are two things about the scaffold that I think are new and promising. One is the way they can build in those tiny channels so that the axons grow in orderly parallel bundles instead of all helter skelter. The other is the way they can use MRI images to make the scaffold match the exact shape and size of any lesion.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Moe's Avatar
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    Rats and mice fairytales that 'may' benefit humans someday are so 70's technology to me: All talk, no action... non-SCI wannabe news anchors under a paycheck hype all they want: It's 2019, show me HUMANS. Something really worth to get excited about. In 20 yrs gonna play the same ol' record propaganda again... "cured mice may benefit humans" bla-bla BS. What a tease for a SCI'ered reader. How about less talk and more action from the source?
    Last edited by Moe; 07-10-2019 at 07:52 PM. Reason: typo
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  9. #39
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kate View Post
    Thank you, Niallel! I wrote a column for New Mobility about this 3D scaffold + growth factors + neural stem cells combination ... I think it will be in the July issue.

    There are two things about the scaffold that I think are new and promising. One is the way they can build in those tiny channels so that the axons grow in orderly parallel bundles instead of all helter skelter. The other is the way they can use MRI images to make the scaffold match the exact shape and size of any lesion.
    whens this come out?
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