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Thread: cruise ship

  1. #11
    No, you would have to bring your own cart. It would also be difficult to use ashore in areas other than on the sand. At most ports you disembark in a fairly industrial area that is all paved, and there are not always curb cuts. Entrances to stores and restaurants often are 1-2 steps up as well. It may be a considerable walk to the area where you can get a cab or other transportation. Ship's tour buses are rarely accessible but are parked closer to the ship usually.

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 01-10-2019 at 04:58 PM.
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  2. #12
    I believe that the door width on regular cabins is 22 inches. If you use a wheelchair full time you will probably not be able to get into a regular cabin. Some cruise ships have two types of accessible cabins, one for semi ambulatory people and one for full time wheelchair users. The semi ambulatory cabin has no barriers and a wide door, but it is very small and uncomfortable for full time wheelchair users. I once got one of those in Carnival and I had a rough time getting around inside the cabin. Other than that, enjoy your cruise, it is worth it.
    T6 complete (or so I think), SCI since September 21, 2003

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    anyone got pics from inside an 'accessible' cabin?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by RJC View Post
    anyone got pics from inside an 'accessible' cabin?
    Which cruise line? They can vary significantly by the line and the specific ship or cabin.

    Here is a video of a Sapphire Princess accessible cabin from 2013 (she does not say which cabin this is though):


    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #15
    Here is one from the RCCL Navigator of the Seas (cabin 6304) from 2017:


    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #16
    Here is one from the NCL Bliss (cabin 11629) from 2018:


    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #17
    I wonder how many square feet are in those rooms, because they look really small. Getting a power chair beside the bed for a transfer looks very tight. Is there really a 5-6 foot turning radius in the living space of the cabins. And the bathroom corner sinks don't appear to be deep enough if you are tall and need more depth to pull under the sink. Tall people have much longer foot rest hangers than people of average height or shorter, and usually they (I) have to kick the foot rests further out to clear the floor. With sinks like this my toes usually hit the wall before I can pull under the sink far enough to cover my lap. Center posts supports under the sink impede toe space even further, especially if you have a solid foot rest.

    Do cruise ships offer upgraded wheelchair accessible rooms that are more suite like, with more room in the living space?

    Two of the rooms seemed to below decks or inside cabins as there were no exterior doors/terraces or "portholes." Can we say claustrophobia?
    Last edited by gjnl; 01-10-2019 at 08:05 PM.

  8. #18
    The wheelchair accessible cabins nearly always have more square footage than non-accessible cabins in the same price class. Yes, sometimes they are inside cabins, which never bothered us as these are in the least expensive categories, and we didn't spend much time in the cabin except for sleeping, bathing, and dressing. If you want to shell out the $$$ for a suite, most cruise ships have these that are accessible too.

    Public areas are almost all accessible, and we would sit there to read, chat, or watch the scenery. I think out of 17 cruises I went on with my parents, we had a balcony once, which we never used as my mother was always cold. Keep in mind that the ADA does not apply to cruise ship cabins (just like hotel rooms), so you may not find ADA-compliant bathroom features or turning space. We did a lot of investigation through the Special Needs dept. that most cruise lines have; several times they arranged to have digital photos sent to us of the actual cabin we were booking and even measurements of things like bed and toilet height.

    We usually had the beds moved to either wall with the bedside stands next to each other between to make it easier to transfer (using my mother's travel lift usually) except when we had a cabin like the RCCL one above (with the balcony) when we kept the two beds together for my parents, and I slept on the fold out couch. Always open space under the bed (no platform beds) which was great with the lift. We just had to be sure that the cabin steward did not store the quilt/bedspread under the bed when making up the bed at night (common) so that the lift would fit underneath. Many people store their luggage under the bed, so the open space is not unique to accessible cabins. Accessible cabins that sleep more than 2 are VERY rare; most often when we found one I ended up on a roll-away or upper bunk. We also often had them remove excess furniture (like coffee tables or easy chairs) for us to give more floor space. The cabin stewards always got this done nearly as soon as requested.

    Yes, sometimes we had to remove my mother's feet from her footrests to get under the sink in the bathroom, and the fold down seat in the shower was rarely useable, especially if we were at sea and it was rough, and my mother's balance was poor. We took a rolling shower/commode chair designed for travel that would easily roll into the shower, and over the toilet, and kept that and the lift stored in the shower when the shower was not in use.

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 01-10-2019 at 09:06 PM.
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    The wheelchair accessible cabins nearly always have more square footage than non-accessible cabins in the same price class. Yes, sometimes they are inside cabins, which never bothered us as these are in the least expensive categories, and we didn't spend much time in the cabin except for sleeping, bathing, and dressing. If you want to shell out the $$$ for a suite, most cruise ships have these that are accessible too.

    Public areas are almost all accessible, and we would sit there to read, chat, or watch the scenery. I think out of 17 cruises I went on with my parents, we had a balcony once, which we never used as my mother was always cold. Keep in mind that the ADA does not apply to cruise ship cabins (just like hotel rooms), so you may not find ADA-compliant bathroom features or turning space. We did a lot of investigation through the Special Needs dept. that most cruise lines have; several times they arranged to have digital photos sent to us of the actual cabin we were booking and even measurements of things like bed and toilet height.

    We usually had the beds moved to either wall with the bedside stands next to each other between to make it easier to transfer (using my mother's travel lift usually) except when we had a cabin like the RCCL one above (with the balcony) when we kept the two beds together for my parents, and I slept on the fold out couch. Always open space under the bed (no platform beds) which was great with the lift. We just had to be sure that the cabin steward did not store the quilt/bedspread under the bed when making up the bed at night (common) so that the lift would fit underneath. Many people store their luggage under the bed, so the open space is not unique to accessible cabins. Accessible cabins that sleep more than 2 are VERY rare; most often when we found one I ended up on a roll-away or upper bunk. We also often had them remove excess furniture (like coffee tables or easy chairs) for us to give more floor space. The cabin stewards always got this done nearly as soon as requested.

    Yes, sometimes we had to remove my mother's feet from her footrests to get under the sink in the bathroom, and the fold down seat in the shower was rarely useable, especially if we were at sea and it was rough, and my mother's balance was poor. We took a rolling shower/commode chair designed for travel that would easily roll into the shower, and over the toilet, and kept that and the lift stored in the shower when the shower was not in use.

    (KLD)
    Unapologetically, whenever, NL and I travel, it has always "first cabin" accommodations. Getting there is half the fun. Life is too short not to treat yourself if you can afford it. The two of us have been very fortunate, and worked hard to have what we have and we aren't getting any younger...we need to do what we can do now, the way we want to do it. We haven't done a cruise because of the lack of accommodations in which we would like to travel. We have thought about booking a cruise with two accommodations, one that is accessible for the bathroom things, and one that is otherwise large and accessible where we can be comfortable and enjoy our time on vacation and together. We don't like having to travel with an attendant, a third wheel...just cramps our style. Hopefully we can do it our way for quite a while longer. You know when you get to be our age there are the go go years and then the no go years.

  10. #20
    If you are looking for lux, check out both the Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity accessible penthouse suites. My parents got upgrade to that from their regular mid-range (with a window) accessible cabin once on a trans-Atlantic repositioning cruise, complete with butler. The Serenity has 8 accessible cabins (2 penthouses) and the Symphony only 4 accessible cabins (2 penthouses). We were also on another Crystal cruise once when Caspar Weinberger and his wife (who had MS) were in the accessible penthouse suite.

    Many other cruise lines also have wheelchair accessible suites, if you don't mind paying the money.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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