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Thread: After 47 years, I finally have depression.

  1. #1

    After 47 years, I finally have depression.

    I just started taking Lexapro today. It might take effect in 14 days. That's 47 years of quadness.

  2. #2
    Doctors say spinal cord injured folks have residual depression by definition. I've always taken that to mean our conditions leave us with this residual/partial baseline type of depression, regardless of how we feel.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    Doctors say spinal cord injured folks have residual depression by definition. I've always taken that to mean our conditions leave us with this residual/partial baseline type of depression, regardless of how we feel.
    Sounds more like the human condition.

  4. #4
    Hey Peter
    I think it's a big step to seek medical help for depression really regardless of the level. Be patient it might take a while to get the right mix for you. Best of luck and congrats on 47 years!




    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Peter View Post
    I just started taking Lexapro today. It might take effect in 14 days. That's 47 years of quadness.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Peter View Post
    I just started taking Lexapro today. It might take effect in 14 days. That's 47 years of quadness.
    Wondering if you have someone, professional or friend to talk to about things, in addition to your medication. Getting older can be a massive challenge for someone with paralysis. Are you getting help/equipment that would help you lessen any load? 2019 will be my 70th year of Polio, and my husband's 48th year of SCI. I grew up with my paralysis so didn't really experience a major life change like my husband did at age 25. Most non-disabled folks have no clue what is faced on a day to day basis. Give yourself a pat on the back for coping all these years.
    I have long felt that many who appear 'non-disabled' may have worse issues than I have - loss of a child, disease, etc. Somehow this helps me put things into perspective.
    Hoping 2019 will be a great year for you.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    Doctors say spinal cord injured folks have residual depression by definition. I've always taken that to mean our conditions leave us with this residual/partial baseline type of depression, regardless of how we feel.
    I am not a fan of generalizations. My innate personality is cheerful and sociable. Abuse in my teens left me morose and quiet until I got out on my own. The SCI accident left me with brief bout of crying every day, but then I go back to work on rehab. I'm C5-6 incomplete. Normally cheerful again in these years despite a problematic marriage, I've found myself flirting with depression over the past month. I did some research and stopped using weed as a sleep aid. Miracle of wonders, I'm waking up cheerful again.

    Of course we react to life events and I hope Uncle Pete finds success with the medication, but I think the above generalization is wrong.

    Steven212- Definitely! The human condition. We react to life and "getting old" is a tough one for any disabled or ill person. "Getting old" is a poor label for losing capabilities. The term lends itself to a sense that we cannot fix problems.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    Doctors say spinal cord injured folks have residual depression by definition. I've always taken that to mean our conditions leave us with this residual/partial baseline type of depression, regardless of how we feel.
    Not sure which doctors are saying this, but I?m fairly sure the above statement is not scientifically based and has no evidence to support it other than someone feeling like SCIers are always gonna be depressed cuz we?re so damn disabled.

    but in the interest of providing further unverifiable and unscientific opini?n to the conversation, I will give my opinion.

    Spinal cord injury predisposes to depression because it is a chronic, annoying, disabling and painful injury. It doesn?t cause depression and very many people with spinal cord injuries are not the least bit depressed. There is no such thing as any disease (even ones that directly cause depression such as hypothyroidism) that presents so consistently that it universally causes ?residual/partial baseline? depression. If you?re not feeling depressed, guess what? You?re not depressed.

    So now i have thoroughly refuted whichever doctors opinion you are quoting above. Since i am a doctor my opinion should hold just as much weight as theirs. And since I?m a psychiatrist I probably know a bit more about depression than they do (unless of course they are psychiatrists as well, you don?t mention their specialty). And since I also have a spinal cord injury I?m pretty sure I outrank them in terms of experience, expertise and knowledge on this particular subject.

    Edit: of course my opinion above is still just my opinion. I?m not aware of any research that refutes or confirms the hypothesis that all SCI people are a little depressed. That may well be true, I just think it is very unlikely to be true.

  8. #8
    I was told our Serotonin uptake is affected after SCI. This can cause mood swings. I could map it everymonth on my upswings and downswings. Bupropion helps to regulate the Serotonin and lessons the depression.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    I was told our Serotonin uptake is affected after SCI. This can cause mood swings. I could map it everymonth on my upswings and downswings. Bupropion helps to regulate the Serotonin and lessons the depression.
    Interesting... bupropion is one of the few antidepressants that doesn't really affect serotonin. It works mostly on dopamine and norepinephrine (and has some activity at the nicotinic receptor). It's great that it helps you, I'm glad you found something that works for you (bupropion is a great antidepressant that avoids the weight gain, sedation and GI side effects of most of the serotonergic drugs), perhaps attributing this improvement purely to serotonin is a bit overly simplistic.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    Doctors say spinal cord injured folks have residual depression by definition. I've always taken that to mean our conditions leave us with this residual/partial baseline type of depression, regardless of how we feel.
    I've been told that about MS, too...yet I have never been depressed until this year, when a lot of other things (unrelated to MS) clobbered me, and those are situational issues that I'll have to address on their own terms.

    I take funklab's word as authoritative in this matter...to do otherwise would be to accept a form of what Andrew Weil, MD calls "medical hexing": saddling a patient with a grim prognosis from the get-go. We all have to deal with what's in front of us, using appropriate tools and/or therapies, no matter what the starting conditions are.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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