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Thread: Hey Santa, what happened to a cure for christmas?

  1. #31
    I think we can all agree that being able to see into the future requires scientific advancements well beyond what's required for a SCI cure.

    Just because it hasn't happened in the past, doesn't mean its not going to happen in the future.

    A cure will be found, just that no one knows when.

  2. #32
    Coming up to 40 years, I give up
    "Yesterday's History,Tomorrow's a Mystery"

  3. #33
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    Regarding that "5 years" lie - someone at last will guess. I believe so. I would even give up walking for regaining sexual function and being able to piss and shit on my own instead of inserting those damn catheters six times a day.

  4. #34
    Niall, the rat study wasn't just for acute or subacute injuies:

    In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4?6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05). Open field BBB locomotor scores showed a significant improvement in the NgR-treated group relative to the control group (P<0.005, repeated measures ANOVA). An increase in raphespinal axon density caudal to the injury is detected in NgR1-decoy-treated animals by immunohistology and by positron emission tomography using a serotonin reuptake ligand.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by FellowHawkeye View Post
    Niall, the rat study wasn't just for acute or subacute injuies:

    In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4?6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05). Open field BBB locomotor scores showed a significant improvement in the NgR-treated group relative to the control group (P<0.005, repeated measures ANOVA). An increase in raphespinal axon density caudal to the injury is detected in NgR1-decoy-treated animals by immunohistology and by positron emission tomography using a serotonin reuptake ligand.
    Thats right, when I said the others I meant the 10 other trials that I didn't provide the links for. This is the main one that references Chronic injuries that they used in their funding materials.

  6. #36
    During the treatment phase of the study, BBB scores showed a significant improvement in the NgR-treated group relative to the IgG group (P=0.002, by repeated measures ANOVA), while no significant improvement versus time was detected in the IgG group from a pre-treatment value of 7.75+/-0.10 to 8.10+/-0.20 post-treatment. BBB scores of the AA-NgR(310)ecto-Fc treated group were significantly improved between 8 to 12 weeks of treatment, at 21-25 weeks post-contusion (P<0.01, ANOVA, from 7.75+/-0.10 at 12 weeks to 8.65+/-0.20 at 25 weeks, Fig. 5E). Thus, AA-NgR(310)ecto-Fc treatment of chronic spinal contusion improves neurological recovery, in particular open field locomotion.
    A "moderate" contusion injury was given to the rats - which you could liken to an incomplete human injury. The rats were naturally able to recover to a BBB score of ~7.75 and with the NgR intervention a BBB score of 8.65. That's less than 1 point move on the BBB scale.

    Note that the BBB score for a healthy rat is 21.

    You can see what an increase of BBB 7 to a BBB 9 (a more generous range than was achieved in this study) gives you below.....


    BBB SCALE
    O -No observable movement of the hindlimbs.

    1. Slight (limited) movement of one or two joints, usually hip and/or knee.
    2. Extensive movement of one joint or extensive movement of one joint and slight movement of the other.
    3. Extensive movement of two joints.
    4. Slight movement of all three joints of the hindlimbs.
    5. Slight movement of two joints and extensive movement of the third joint.
    6. Extensive movement of two joints and slight movement of the third joint.
    7. Extensive movement of the three joints in the hindlimbs.
    8. Sweeping without weight bearing or plantar support of the paw without weight bearing.
    9. Plantar support of the paw with weight bearing only in the support stage (i.e., when static) or occasional, frequent or inconsistent dorsal stepping with weight bearing and no plantar stepping.
    10. Plantar stepping with occasional weight bearing and no forelimb-hindlimb coordination.
    11. Plantar stepping with frequent to consistent weight bearing and occasional forelimb-hindlimb coordination.
    12. Plantar stepping with frequent to consistent weight bearing and occasional forelimb-hindlimb coordination.
    13. Plantar stepping with frequent to consistent weight bearing and frequent forelimb-hindlimb coordination.
    14. Plantar stepping with consistent weight support, consistent forelimb-hindlimb coordination and predominantly rotated paw position (internally or externally) during locomotion both at the instant of initial contact with the surface as well as before moving the toes at the end of the support stage or frequent plantar stepping, consistent forelimb-hindlimb coordination and occasional dorsal stepping.
    15. Consistent plantar stepping, consistent forelimb-hindlimb coordination and no movement of the toes or occasional movement during forward movement of limb; predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the time of initial contact.
    16. Consistent plantar stepping and forelimb-hindlimb coordination during gait and movement of the toes occurs frequently during forward movement of the limb; the predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the time of initial contact and curved at the instant of movement.
    17. Consistent plantar stepping and forelimb-hindlimb coordination during gait and movement of the toes occurs frequently during forward movement of limb; the predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the time of initial contact and at the instant of movement of the toes.
    18. Consistent plantar stepping and forelimb-hindlimb coordination during gait and movement of the toes occurs consistently during forward movement of limb; the predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the time of initial contact and curved during movement of the toes.
    19. Consistent plantar stepping and forelimb-hindlimb coordination during gait and movement of the toes occurs consistently during forward movement of limb; the predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the instant of contact and at the time of movement of the toes, and the animal presents a downward tail some or all of the time.
    20. Consistent plantar stepping and forelimb-hindlimb coordination during gait and movement of the toes occurs consistently during forward movement of limb; the predominant paw position is parallel to the body at the instant of contact and at the time of movement of toes, and the animal presents consistent elevation of the tail and trunk instability.
    21. Consistent plantar stepping and coordinated gait, consistent movement of the toes; paw position is predominantly parallel to the body during the whole support stage; consistent trunk stability; consistent tail elevation.
    I will let you decide on whether you think all SCI organisations that are committed to curing chronic SCI should club together and throw millions at this or not.
    Last edited by Fly_Pelican_Fly; 01-01-2019 at 11:39 AM.

  7. #37
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    Between Silver, the latest ChABC+oNOCs results from Canada and the work in Spain, the technology now exists where a relatively small sum of 100-200 million could drive these to market and save at least the US taxpayers a much larger amount annually. I.e. the government(s) need to drive this.
    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

  8. #38
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    https://spinalcordresearchandadvocac...l-cord-injury/

    Similar recovery to Renetx after a single treatment of 2 injections spaced a week apart.
    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Peter View Post
    You'll get a cure. In 5 more years.

    It looks like I write @ 100 posts a year.
    As I've seen since 2011....

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    A "moderate" contusion injury was given to the rats - which you could liken to an incomplete human injury. The rats were naturally able to recover to a BBB score of ~7.75 and with the NgR intervention a BBB score of 8.65. That's less than 1 point move on the BBB scale.

    Note that the BBB score for a healthy rat is 21.

    You can see what an increase of BBB 7 to a BBB 9 (a more generous range than was achieved in this study) gives you below.....



    I will let you decide on whether you think all SCI organisations that are committed to curing chronic SCI should club together and throw millions at this or not.
    This is a perfect example of something that is statistically significant vs. practically significant. Statistically, sure, they had beautiful significance. Practically, these results are meaningless and analogous to what can be achieved with rehabilitation alone in humans with similarly severe injuries.

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