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Thread: Joystick "tip" coming off (readily)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art454 View Post
    I put a drop or to inside the rubber then put it on. That way it wont drip down on the rod. To take it off all you have to do is twist it off if you need to. The gell type works best but have used both. Anything would work even contact cement. Just stay away from JB weld.....lol
    Yeah, I thought about that. But, was afraid folks would end up putting too much in the tip/hole. Then, jamming it on and watching all that ooze out all over the boot! And, of course, instinctively trying to wipe it off with a fingertip (and you know where THAT leads! )

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    You might want to try using this to make a custom control tip. I used this on my mother's power chair:

    https://sugru.com/

    (KLD)
    I'll bookmark that (as I suspect it will come in handy, sooner or later). But, I was looking for a fix that I could just convey to some unknown individual over the phone (instead of having to make a "personal appearance") and have high hope of success.

  3. #13
    Seriously, wrap a small piece of 220 grit sandpaper around the stem. I specifically deal with this issue all the time and it.


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Seriously, wrap a small piece of 220 grit sandpaper around the stem. I specifically deal with this issue all the time and it.
    I am not the one who will be doing the repair! Rather, it's a woman that I've never met who's been confined to a bed prior to having the powerchair. Do you think she is likely to know where to buy 220 grit sandpaper? And, trim it to a 3/8" wide strip (circumference of a 1/8" dia shaft)? Then, hold it in place (wrapped snugly around the shaft) while she tries to slip the rubber tip on?

    You have to come up with solutions that are targeted to the folks who will actually be performing them.

    I can tell you how to troubleshoot a blown FET in your chair's motor controller and be back up and running for just a few dollars. But, chances are, you won't be physically or intellectually capable of performing said repair -- nor are you likely to have the equipment on hand to do so. As such, it makes more sense for me to tell you to replace your motor controller -- regardless of the cost! -- than to offer you a solution that is beyond your reach.

  5. #15
    A small sliver of Scotch tape wrapped around the stem will probably do the trick.

  6. #16
    I hardly felt that response was warranted. Hell, a piece of brown paper towel would work. Teflon plumbing tape would work. Tapes and adhesives should be avoided.


  7. #17
    Wrapping a piece of scotch tape around the stem does work. It's an easy fix using a household item the person probably has on hand.
    Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

  8. #18
    I'd have to guess more households would have some scotch tape around instead of 220 sand paper.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    I am not the one who will be doing the repair! Rather, it's a woman that I've never met who's been confined to a bed prior to having the powerchair. Do you think she is likely to know where to buy 220 grit sandpaper? And, trim it to a 3/8" wide strip (circumference of a 1/8" dia shaft)? Then, hold it in place (wrapped snugly around the shaft) while she tries to slip the rubber tip on?

    You have to come up with solutions that are targeted to the folks who will actually be performing them.

    I can tell you how to troubleshoot a blown FET in your chair's motor controller and be back up and running for just a few dollars. But, chances are, you won't be physically or intellectually capable of performing said repair -- nor are you likely to have the equipment on hand to do so. As such, it makes more sense for me to tell you to replace your motor controller -- regardless of the cost! -- than to offer you a solution that is beyond your reach.
    You asked for input, and SCI_OTR gave you just that. He is one of the longest, most respected members of our forums, has a SCI himself, and is an expert on wheelchair set-up and customization. Lashing out at him was unwarranted and rude.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    You asked for input, and SCI_OTR gave you just that. He is one of the longest, most respected members of our forums, has a SCI himself, and is an expert on wheelchair set-up and customization. Lashing out at him was unwarranted and rude.
    I don't feel I "lashed out"; nor do I consider my comments to have been "rude" or "unwarranted". They illustrate the problem with providing solutions that make assumptions about the capabilities (physical, intellectual and financial) of the person who will end up making those repairs ("of unknown skills and physical capabilities"). I made no ad hominem attacks on him or his character.

    I chose an example that I felt would be something that folks here could relate to: (expensive!) chair repairs that I would consider easy (replacing a blown FET in a motor controller) and straightforward but impractical for most readers. So, I'd never consider suggesting or even offering up the possibility of such solutions. Even if it may be that SCI_OTR (or others) has a PhD in EE (unbeknownst to me).

    The first "mobility device" that I refurbished for a client required the client to purchase replacement batteries on her own (we have no budget for replacement parts -- just "free labor", to the extent that I want to provide it). I provided detailed information as to the make/model of batteries, how to connect them, wiring diagrams, where to purchase them, etc. Yet, failed to understand that the client (whom I'd actually met!) could not lift the 3 (THREE!) pound batteries, lacking strength to do so. Something that hadn't occurred to me in my analysis of the solution I'd proposed. As a result, she ended up frustrated and I ended up chagrined/embarassed. Of course, having her find a way to transport the unit back to us was a significant inconvenience. So, I lost a "pro bono day" driving to her home to make the repair, there. A bad use of everyone's time (cuz no one else was able to benefit from my donated time, that week).

    I donate time to refurbish a chair a week, on average. And, am largely unavailable at other times. So, any bad assumptions that I make (or advice that I act on) means a client will be stuck twiddling their thumbs for a week -- or more -- until I return. E.g., I parted with this chair last Friday and it will be at least next Wednesday before anyone will be able to convey to me any problems that it's encountered. A free chair sitting unusable is no better than no chair at all!

    If you examine my comments in other threads, you will see that I try to express my "solutions" in terms that make as few assumptions about the readers' backgrounds as possible and relate the explanations to other things that folks are likely familiar with (e.g., why your phone has so much better of an understanding of how much charge is left in its battery than your powerchair -- despite nearly identical operating environments!) A technically correct explanation that is effectively unusable is no better than no explanation at all!

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