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Thread: troubleshooting buddy desktopmic 7G

  1. #1

    troubleshooting buddy desktopmic 7G

    I have had very good luck with this particular microphone use with my Dragon voice program (version 11.5 professional). Lately though, the indicator light that ranges from yellow to red when Dragon is listening has been temperamental. My best recognition is when the bar is yellow and extend out to less than half of the indicator area. When that area is gray indicating that it is sleeping, it is frequently extending over 75% of that area. Randomly if you jiggle the wire going into the base of the microphone, it will rectify the problem (making the darker area maybe only 25%of that area).Can the cord be replaced or does the entire microphone need to be replaced? Input is appreciated. I am very technology inexperienced. I'm using Windows 7 on a Toshiba laptop.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by tinern View Post
    I have had very good luck with this particular microphone use with my Dragon voice program (version 11.5 professional). Lately though, the indicator light that ranges from yellow to red when Dragon is listening has been temperamental. My best recognition is when the bar is yellow and extend out to less than half of the indicator area. When that area is gray indicating that it is sleeping, it is frequently extending over 75% of that area. Randomly if you jiggle the wire going into the base of the microphone, it will rectify the problem (making the darker area maybe only 25%of that area).Can the cord be replaced or does the entire microphone need to be replaced? Input is appreciated. I am very technology inexperienced. I'm using Windows 7 on a Toshiba laptop.
    I assume this is a USB microphone? I.e., the connector that plugs into the computer looks like the connector on your keyboard or mouse:



    ("old fashioned" microphones had a round, cylindrical plug that looks like the connector on your iPod headphones, etc.)


    In either case, the end of the cord closest to the microphone may be "captive" (permanently connected to the microphone base) or it may also have a connector allowing the entire cord to be removed/replaced. If that's the case, you would start by replacing that cord.

    In the "old fashioned" case, it will likely have identical connectors on both ends. In the USB case, it will likely have a mini-USB or micro-USB connector on the end that plugs into the microphone base. (microUSB is common on many phones -- not iPhones; mini-USB is common on many tablets; I would suspect mini-USB, in this case)



    Any of these cords are readily available and inexpensive (though there are places that charge outrageous prices for them, as with anything else). I would first ask friends/neighbors if they have one you could borrow for 5 minutes (to test that as a solution).

    It's possible that the connector at the microphone end has broken loose (electrically) inside the microphone base. This would require a repair (replacing it or resoldering it onto the circuit board INSIDE the microphone base -- no joy, there!)

    You can also try to get an idea as to what the computer (and, thus, Dragon) is "hearing" when you are silent. (I suspect there is a way to do this from inside Dragon but I don't use it so can't help, there...)

    From the W7 START menu, click on "Control Panel" (its on the right side of the menu). The "Control Panel" opens. Click on "Hardware and Sound".

    Then, "Manage audio devices". You will see a small dialog with "tabs" (like the tabs on hanging file folders) across the top labeled: Playback, Recording, Sounds, Communications... Select (click on) the Recording tab. You should see your microphone listed. Select it (click on it).

    The "Properties" button should then become available (it is greyed out until you've selected something). Click on it.

    A "Microphone Properties" dialog appears, also with tabs across the top: General, Listen, Levels, Enhancements, ...
    Select the Listen tab.

    Here, things can get startling, depending on how loud you have your speakers, where they are placed, etc. So, familiarize yourself with the process I'm describing before you go clicking away (you are likely to have feedback which can leave you scrambling to figure out how to turn the d*mn thing off!).

    Start by lowering the volume of your speakers. There is a little speaker icon in the "System Tray" (that area down in the bottom right corner near the time display). Clicking on it will bring up a volume control. Or, your keyboard might have a more convenient "knob" that does the same thing. If you are using headphones, you may want to take them off, temporarily (you don't want to hear any howling that close to your eardrums!)

    When you're sure the volume is really low, click on the "Listen to this device" checkbox in the "Microphone Properties" dialog that appeared above. Then, click "apply" -- NOT "OK" (if you click OK, the dialog will disappear and you'll have to call it back up, again).

    If the computer isn't HOWLING (feedback) at you, then slowly increase the volume and listen to see if you're hearing lots of static. Or, anything else other than "silence". See how things change when you're wiggling the cable. Static/crackling/hiss/hum (not HOWL!) is usually indicative of a fault in a wire/connection.

    When done, uncheck the "Listen to this device" box and again click "Apply". Close all of the dialogs.

    You may also discover that the "gain" (amplification) of your microphone is too high (yeah, I know it worked BEFORE, but magical things have a way of happening on PC's -- rarely to your advantage!) and might need to be tweeked.

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