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Thread: Confidence in DME techs

  1. #11
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Rather fix my own chair. Have done so for 30+yrs.
    Unfortunately, not everyone has the dexterity, skillset and motivation to do so.
    Skillset can be learned.
    Motivation is being insanely frustrated by DME repair techs and having your chair disappear for days
    So if you have the dexterity, what's the excuse?

    Swapping out caster bearings took half a day the first time I tried. Now I can do all four in under 60min. Put on an episode of Breaking Bad and It's not a bad way to spend an hour.

    Take control of your equipment - the thing that you cannot survive without. Take ownership of your wheelchair.

    We're here to help and answer questions along the way.

  2. #12
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    While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Tetracyclone View Post
    While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.
    Nobody should fault you for that. BTW if you get the chance ask him if Marathons are harder to install on wheelchair wheels than bicycle wheels. I'm thinking about tightness and the issue of pinched tubes.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonoise View Post
    BTW if you get the chance ask him if Marathons are harder to install on wheelchair wheels than bicycle wheels. .
    After years of installing Marathons and finding the tricks of doing that best...putting my new Right Runs on my wheels were done with my bare hands and no tools. Marathons learn you good that way, lol

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Tetracyclone View Post
    While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.
    Exactly. "Anyone" can learn how to do brain surgery. Why aren't there more brain surgeons?

    People learn best when they are exposed to something repeatedly. I can teach my other half how to change a tire -- hell, it's easy! But, the time between my teaching her and the time she actually gets a flat will probably be long enough that she'll forget exactly where to position the jack (so the unitized body doesn't crumble if placed wrong). Or, that the valve stem on the spare needs to face outwards when the tire is mounted. Or, that she needs to periodically check the inflation of the spare to ensure it's ready for use, when the time comes.

    And, that's a relatively "common" occurrence -- far more common than replacing the PCV valve (which is arguably an easier task).

    I've found many people tend to get intimidated or overcautious with tasks that have high "failure costs". I.e., screw up your chair repair and now you're stuck waiting even longer to get mobile, again! For them, the "peace of mind" that comes with off-loading the task to a "paid professional" is well worth the added cost (and inconvenience).

    Think back to the days when VCRs were common in virtually every home. Why did so many of them NOT display the correct time? Did you need a PhD in order to set the clock? (or, was it a rare enough occurrence -- power failure -- that you forgot how and misplaced the manual that would remind you?)

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