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Thread: Help with patient lift recommendations please

  1. #1

    Help with patient lift recommendations please

    I am trying to get a patient (Hoyer) lift to transfer, and I saw that on an old post KLD the SpinalNurse had recommended the Molift Smart 150 and the Hoyer Advance (not the Advance-E) to someone.

    Would those still be the lifts that would be recommended for ease of use for one person, a small footprint, general movability, etc.?

    Thanks so much for your help, Melissa
    BTW, I'm a C5/6 SCI level and have been injured since 1998
    Life is a lesson you learn when you're through.

  2. #2
    Those two lifts are great for both home use and travel. If you are looking or something for your home only, you may want to consider a ceiling track lift.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by melliska View Post
    I am trying to get a patient (Hoyer) lift to transfer, and I saw that on an old post KLD the SpinalNurse had recommended the Molift Smart 150 and the Hoyer Advance (not the Advance-E) to someone.

    Would those still be the lifts that would be recommended for ease of use for one person, a small footprint, general movability, etc.?

    Thanks so much for your help, Melissa
    BTW, I'm a C5/6 SCI level and have been injured since 1998
    If you are covered by Medicare, it is highly unlikely that Medicare will fund either one of these lifts. Medicare doesn't usually cover electric patient lifts.

    I've just been through the process of getting a patient lift and the best that Medicare would cover is Medline Hydraulic Patient Lift MDS88200HL

    Note: Prior to the past 2 or 3 weeks a picture would load instead of the link reference that you have to click to view. As Jim has noted in another post, many vBulletin features are not working.
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  4. #4
    Thanks for the replies.

    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Those two lifts are great for both home use and travel. If you are looking or something for your home only, you may want to consider a ceiling track lift.

    (KLD)
    Currently a ceiling lift isn't something that would work for me, but thanks for the suggestion, KLD. Who knows, maybe I'll have a ceiling lift in the future.



    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    If you are covered by Medicare, it is highly unlikely that Medicare will fund either one of these lifts. Medicare doesn't usually cover electric patient lifts.

    I've just been through the process of getting a patient lift and the best that Medicare would cover is Medline Hydraulic Patient Lift MDS88200HL

    Note: Prior to the past 2 or 3 weeks a picture would load instead of the link reference that you have to click to view. As Jim has noted in another post, many vBulletin features are not working.
    Yes, I have Medicare now as my primary insurance (I do also have another full insurance policy secondary. I am very lucky in that regard.) Someone mentioned something about Medicare not covering electric lifts and the electric portion being an upcharge. I am wondering if my secondary insurance would be able to pay for the electric portion if Medicare doesn't. I'll have to ask.

    I guess I should also ask what the pros are in having an electric lift. I'm not at all familiar with patient lifts having only been in one a few times back in 1999.

    Thanks for the great information, gjnl.


    I have my doctor appointment on Tuesday and I'll be getting a prescription, etc. so hopefully I'll have more of an idea by then about what I need. I also have to find a DME supplier that works in my area, sells lifts, and accepts Medicare assignment, so I still have some work left to do on this project. Thanks again for the information! Melissa
    Life is a lesson you learn when you're through.

  5. #5
    Unfortunately, the main benefits of a powered vs. a non-powered lift are not specifically for the person being lifted (so no "medical necessity") but many studies have show that powered lifts significantly reduce repetitive stress musculoskeltal injury for the caregiver, compared to crank or pump manual operated lifts.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by melliska View Post
    Yes, I have Medicare now as my primary insurance (I do also have another full insurance policy secondary. I am very lucky in that regard.) Someone mentioned something about Medicare not covering electric lifts and the electric portion being an upcharge. I am wondering if my secondary insurance would be able to pay for the electric portion if Medicare doesn't. I'll have to ask.

    I guess I should also ask what the pros are in having an electric lift. I'm not at all familiar with patient lifts having only been in one a few times back in 1999.

    Thanks for the great information, gjnl.

    I have my doctor appointment on Tuesday and I'll be getting a prescription, etc. so hopefully I'll have more of an idea by then about what I need. I also have to find a DME supplier that works in my area, sells lifts, and accepts Medicare assignment, so I still have some work left to do on this project. Thanks again for the information! Melissa
    There is a broad misconception about secondary insurance. Medicare pays for 80% of covered charges. The other 20% is left to the patient to pay either out of pocket or through a secondary (supplement) insurance policy or possibly a combination of both. If you have a secondary insurance policy, that covers the entire 20%, they will only pick up the 20% that Medicare does not cover. A secondary will only pay if Medicare pays, i.e., covers the charges. So, if Medicare doesn't cover a particular piece of durable medical equipment, then the secondary will not cover it either. That means you pay out of pocket for the whole thing. If Medicare denies coverage, the secondary will deny coverage.

    The one thing you will have a choice about is the sling. The durable medical supplier will offer you a couple, maybe more options. Generally the best option is a sling that you don't have to sit on. A reasonable choice is a Universal Sling (depending on you level of injury) with or without head support. See the video at this link: https://medmartonline.com/deluxe-spl...CABEgIYZfD_BwE

  7. #7
    We have been using the standard Hoyer manual lifts for decades. They can often be found on Craigslist selling for $100. I use it at home and when traveling, fits in the minivan with no problem. When traveling, we strap a board to the legs and use it as a cart for my supplies and luggage. I have no interest in owning an electric powered lift, and dealing with the required battery maintenance and charging. No one is going to get a repetitive injury using a manual lift twice a day.

    If I were purchasing a lift today I would spend a little extra and get the Hoyer Advance model or comparable. Being able to fold the legs up and store it in a closet would be very convenient.

  8. #8
    Why not the Hoyer Advance-E? I presume the E means electric.

  9. #9
    When it first came out around 2011, it was just called the Hoyer Advance. Now they have renamed the two models:

    • Advance-H: Hydraulic Manual Lift
    • Advance-E: Power Lift


    The power lift is safer and easier to use for your caregivers vs. the manual.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #10
    I will reiterate...if you are expecting Medicare to fund your lift...expect bare, basic, no bells and whistles, and no electric powered amenities. It is just not going to happen. Medicare doesn't care that a lift is easier on a caregiver...it just doesn't matter to them.

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