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Thread: Hoyer Advance 340 lift

  1. #1

    Hoyer Advance 340 lift

    Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

    Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.

    How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.

    Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?

    Or would it just be better to get a manual lift for my purposes. I've never used a lift so I have have no idea how difficult a manual lift would be.

    btw - I thinking about the portable because I want to fold it up and keep it out of the way. I don't have a lot of extra space in my condo.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Can't speak to the battery issues, but a powered lift is much safer to use than a manual for your caregivers.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

    Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.
    You should be able to replace the battery located inside the battery pack. I'll have to check, to be sure, but I think these are just normal gelled electrolyte batteries (in a fancy case).

    How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.
    That depends a lot on the design of the charger. Most aren't designed for long-term "float" service. And, most batteries left on a float charge will degrade, over time. Ideally, they want to be cycled, periodically. That poses a problem for the designer: when is it "safe" to discharge the battery in preparation for recharging it, again? What if the user picks that moment to NEED the battery?

    Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?
    I will have to check to see which model lift I was working on (refurbishing) but I had initially considered it "broken" because it wasn't working "properly" while connected to mains voltage. ISTR thinking that, perhaps, their justification was that you wouldn't want the lift to be movable while tethered to the mains, so, disable it!

    I'll have to check (next monday). Hopefully, my memory won't fault between now and then :-/

  4. #4
    KLD, Don't have care giver yet, know the day is coming. C5/6 quad turning 65 this month. Took a look at my home yesterday and it was quite clear that there were very few places I could use a lift. Wouldn't fit in my bath/shower area, couldn't use it for getting in/out of bed because the bed sits directly on the floor, wouldn't fit down the hall. My living room is about the only place it would have enough room to maneuver around. I don't know how much overhead tracts cost but got a feeling it's probably out of my price range. Got me a little worried.

    automation, Any additional information will be appreciated.

    Thanks for the replies.

  5. #5
    You can't operate a floor based lift by yourself, so whomever is going to assist you will find a powered lift much safer for them. You can do ceiling track lifts, or free standing track lifts, but as you say, they are not cheap, and you of course can only use them where you have installed track. The track lift companies will all provide you with a design and bid based on what your needs are (after making a home visit).

    If you need a caregiver, it would also be better for their back to have a bed that is not just a mattress/box spring on the floor. How do you transfer now?

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    You can't operate a floor based lift by yourself, so whomever is going to assist you will find a powered lift much safer for them. You can do ceiling track lifts, or free standing track lifts, but as you say, they are not cheap, and you of course can only use them where you have installed track. The track lift companies will all provide you with a design and bid based on what your needs are (after making a home visit).

    If you need a caregiver, it would also be better for their back to have a bed that is not just a mattress/box spring on the floor. How do you transfer now?

    (KLD)
    I have a little leg use and between that and locking my shoulders and arms, I'm able to transfer. But it's starting to get sketchy, especially the first thing in the morning. I gotta do a little exercise sitting on the edge of the bed to get the blood flowing before I transfer. lol

  7. #7
    Some years back I was afraid of falling in my home and needing help to get up, as I am a C6 quad. This would require a two-person operation. I decided to get an emergency lift which will enable only one person to do the job, as even the strongest caregiver who is good at bed to chair transfers would be in a dangerous position to get someone off the floor. That being said you would need some way to communicate to someone that you need help and to come to the house/apartment, as well as a means to get in. This can be done with a key lockbox outside the door that someone knows the combination to or you can give the combination to.

    If you go this route 1st make sure that your lift can get you off the floor, as most lifts are designed only for bed/chair heights. Next, if it is only going to be used for emergencies, and hopefully rarely at that, I would not go for something that needs a battery as will rarely be used and will require constant monitoring/charging/replacement, if not usage to keep it in reliable working order.

    I have a old Smith lift that operates on some type of worm gear crank. It requires extremely little effort.

    Again, the key is to make sure your lift can get you off the floor, as the leverage on the base and arm is greater than in your standard bed lift.

    An overhead lift which is naturally fixed in location would not be a good solution if you think you may need to be lifted off the floor in any room of the house.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saint Petersburg , Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

    Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.

    How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.

    Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?

    Or would it just be better to get a manual lift for my purposes. I've never used a lift so I have have no idea how difficult a manual lift would be.

    btw - I thinking about the portable because I want to fold it up and keep it out of the way. I don't have a lot of extra space in my condo.

    Thanks
    I have an electric Hoyer Advance. It works really good. Yes you can take the battery pack apart and replace the batteries. They told me to keep it on the charge when not in use. They said you should not let the batteries drain all the way down. The lift will not work if the batteries are dead period. Having it plugged in will do nothing.

  9. #9
    crags,
    Again, the key is to make sure your lift can get you off the floor, as the leverage on the base and arm is greater than in your standard bed lift.
    I agree but the question is how do you know till you try. I was hoping to buy the lift from eBay or Craigs list to save some money. I think I need to do some more research before I make a choice.

    Hack, That's good info about the batteries. How long have you had the lift? Have you ever had to replace the batteries?

    Thanks for the reply.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saint Petersburg , Florida
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    crags,


    I agree but the question is how do you know till you try. I was hoping to buy the lift from eBay or Craigs list to save some money. I think I need to do some more research before I make a choice.

    Hack, That's good info about the batteries. How long have you had the lift? Have you ever had to replace the batteries?

    Thanks for the reply.
    I've had the lift for around 3 years. I had the batteries replaced once. My fault I didn't keep the lift plugged in when it wasn't being used. Big no no. Took it to the Interstate Batteries store and the guy popped the case open and replaced the batteries.

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