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Thread: Portable ramps

  1. #1
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Portable ramps

    Has anyone ever purchased/used portable ramps for accessing places in the community that might not otherwise be accessible? Restaurants/stores with a step for instance, or I wonder even if traveling to NYC for example, where the subway has gaps/varied height differences, I wonder if something like what is shown in the pic would be practical? Though pricey, the one in the pic (29" x 29"), weighs under 8 lbs.

    Pic was too large to upload, so here is a link: https://www.spinlife.com/EZ-Access-S...oductID=111704

  2. #2
    When we were relocating from Los Angeles to the San Francisco Bay area, about 30 years ago, we purchased a 6 feet EZ Access Trifold ramp and a 3 feet EZ Access Suitcase ramp so that I could get into houses that we were looking to buy. After we purchased our house, I used these ramps to get into the house until we had a ramp built. They are stacked upright on a luggage carrier in our garage and ready to roll into the van when we visit friends and family. The 6ft. ramp bridges 1-3 steps to a landing then the 3ft. ramp bridges from the landing up a raised threshold. While these ramps can't get me everywhere, they get me into many private homes in our area that are built on a raised foundation. When we visit family in Arizona, I generally just take the 3 ft ramp because most houses that I visit are built on slab construction and I just have to get up a raised threshold.

    These ramps have been very durable and held up well over 30 years. NL did have to replace a couple rivets with bolts and nuts, but it was a fairly simple repair (angled lip edge to the main ramp - rivets popped out).

    The 3ft. Suitcase ramp is about double the weight of the graphite fiber ramp you mention. But, costs less than $150. 16 pounds isn't too difficult to handle. The tri-fold is pretty heavy and is not too user friendly. Deploying the trip-fold is tricky to first time and infrequent users. But, we are glad we have them and they were worth the investment to us.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Great feedback, thank you! Would it be possible, when folded, to somehow hang/mount the suitcase ramp on the back of a power chair? Again, thinking of using when traveling.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    Has anyone ever purchased/used portable ramps for accessing places in the community that might not otherwise be accessible? Restaurants/stores with a step for instance, or I wonder even if traveling to NYC for example, where the subway has gaps/varied height differences, I wonder if something like what is shown in the pic would be practical? Though pricey, the one in the pic (29" x 29"), weighs under 8 lbs.

    Pic was too large to upload, so here is a link: https://www.spinlife.com/EZ-Access-S...oductID=111704
    Hey buddy I think its a waste of time, money and effort on so many levels.

    1st support the business that support our community...Meaning if a business doesn't have someway to get you in move on and find one that does!

    2nd The suitcase ramps to carry and deploy are very cumbersome. To carry one while rolling around on vacation would be a big hassle.

    Trust that there is so much to do on your up coming trips and not have to worry about access, its a minimal issue.

    3rd In New York City itself business can get pretty creative on getting you in from bringing you in though the back, up fright elevators, even their own portable ramps so be open minded. On the subway there is not enough time and crowds are to big and moving to fast.

    Just watch when you do the subway roll down the platform and you will see its not all level so just watch where the gap is minimal and get on there.

    When getting off if it seems to steep go off backward much more safe...let the caster wheels drop off from the train to the platform then lower the drive wheels down.

    This is another big advantage in front wheel drive like we have as it will get you up short steep inclines and declines and not get stuck like a mid wheel.
    Last edited by RollPositive; 10-05-2018 at 02:45 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Travel is just one use. As mentioned, it can be useful when visiting friends that don't otherwise have access. Having friends lift a 400 lb chair over a step or two is not an option.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    Great feedback, thank you! Would it be possible, when folded, to somehow hang/mount the suitcase ramp on the back of a power chair? Again, thinking of using when traveling.
    I can't think of attachment points on a power chair (heck it is hard enough to manage attaching an umbrella or a water bottle) and easy to release hardware that would make mounting or hanging a ramp possible.

    You would be limiting your ability to tilt and elevate on the go. Much as it pains () me to agree with "RollPos..." if you are using the ramp(s) on public transportation and on city sidewalks, it would be a "hassle."

    Our usage has been generally limited to local visits to friend's homes, and taking them with us in the van on trips to visit friend's and family's homes in other states. In these instances, you don't need to worry so much about the weight, because friends and family are always there to help make your visits possible. $$$$ Graphite fiber vs aluminum $$$$

  7. #7
    I agree too big to carry around or for subway use. But works great getting into friends or family homes.

  8. #8
    IMHO trying to carry ramps on vacation is dangerous for you and whomever that attempts to unload/load on your chair before doors close, etc.
    Friends, family I gave that up over 20 years ago if their home was unaccessible I just didn't visit. Mama visited her family and I stayed in motels with pups. When she went from rollator to chair she stopped visiting as well.
    I still have a 6 or 8' folded/suitcase ramp, has handle on one side to carry with that sat unused for about 15 years, no one left here strong enough to carry.
    Had a longer one that folded like this with a handle that one of my brothers gave to some of his in-laws that needed access to their home for a scooter. Think they used screws though ramp into their porch flooring so would not move.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    Travel is just one use. As mentioned, it can be useful when visiting friends that don't otherwise have access. Having friends lift a 400 lb chair over a step or two is not an option.

    We carry one in the back of our van its simple light and works fine at friends homes..

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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by RollPositive View Post
    We carry one in the back of our van its simple light and works fine at friends homes..

    [/IMG]
    This gets you up one threshold step when properties are built on grade....

    But, if you live in areas where houses are built above grade on raised foundations you are going to need 6ft. to 10ft trifold ramps. A single threshold step just won't make it.

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