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Thread: Bed bars?

  1. #1
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    Question Bed bars?

    Does anybody still use old style bed bars like they used to use in rehab and maybe still do from like 20 years ago. It’s a bar that comes back up over the back of the headboard and then arches out over the bed and down with the horizontal bar so you can grab on it and turn yourself and sit against it and lean against it for dressing and stuff like that.

    l’m in the process of building a new house and that’s the old style bed bar I currently have on my bed. My current girlfriend made a semi jokingly semi serious comment about it saying I don’t think we could have sex with that bar over the bed because I’d bang my head on it. Now I‘ve been with girls with that bar on the bed and obviously you can kind of work around it but it’s sort of sitting in an awkward position that isn’t really the best for romance. And admittedly I have had girlfriends bang their head on that even when they were sleeping and going to get up. Obviously not expecting it to be there cause its not normally on a bed for anyone thats not in a wheelchair. Are there any sorts of similar bed bars out there on the market these days that might fold out of the way in some sort yet still be stable?

    I mostly use it for turning myself in bed at night and a lean against it for some basic dressing as much as I can do on my own? Being quadriplegic I rely primarily on my PSW for that but there are elements that I do by myself. And I have wondered over the years if there was a bar system that was less intrusive as I said that could maybe push up and out-of-the-way or be easily moved. When you have that bar with the big base under it and the bed is pressed against the wall there?s not really any way to move it out-of-the-way easily without sliding the whole bed down which really isnt great.

  2. #2
    It's called a hospital bed trapeze. You can get them that attach to certain brands of home care hospital beds, or ones that are free standing and fit at the head of the bed. Some have a swing away feature. Google "hospital bed trapeze swing away" to find some of these.

    That being said, this is really hard on your shoulders, and addressed in the Consortium Clinical Practice Guideline for Shoulder Preservation in SCI as something not to encourage. We stopped using them, or ordering them for home use years ago because this type of overhead lifting is the most damaging to your shoulders.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
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    KLD - thank you for your endless time and knowledge.

  4. #4
    KLD, Yes, they do take a toll on shoulders! I'm guess in neck, too. Had problems with discs and "pinched" nerves to arm/hand doc says from it.
    Been using over bed trapeze attached to headboard for many years. Was much younger then.
    After stroke only have one shoulder that getting abused.
    Guess my wife got use to bar, it has double bars, one as support to main weight bearing bar, Mine, I'm old as a few velcroed monkeys stuck to it and that kinda gives warning of getting close to bars. Mine is set pretty low since use support bar mostly for pulling up towards head of bed, turn from weak side to back and main bar to sit up. With one good hand trapeze triangle itself good for transfers but solid hold on weight bearing bars get most use in moving in bed.
    My hospital bed is 40 something inches wide(think DME called it bariatric, extra width helps with dressing and getting compression hose on legs) and it's way larger than Mama's regular sized one in width and height. DME had take wheels off mine so have same height cause mine was to tall even with it at full down position.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    It's called a hospital bed trapeze. You can get them that attach to certain brands of home care hospital beds, or ones that are free standing and fit at the head of the bed. Some have a swing away feature. Google "hospital bed trapeze swing away" to find some of these.

    That being said, this is really hard on your shoulders, and addressed in the Consortium Clinical Practice Guideline for Shoulder Preservation in SCI as something not to encourage. We stopped using them, or ordering them for home use years ago because this type of overhead lifting is the most damaging to your shoulders.

    (KLD)
    Thank you

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