Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38

Thread: Challenging Ramp Building Project

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    @ automation: the lumber Rich used is pressure treated and it can be bought that meets full ground contact specs. As for the ramp posts - they can be just buried without footers, as long as they're below the frost line. There's no structural load as there is with the deck itself, which he has covered with the concrete support columns.
    Even pressure treated wood isn't "termite proof" (not just "resistant"). It's a common problem that we have, here, and any "wood product" in contact with the soil WILL fail, over time.

    [UNtreated lumber will be visibly compromised in less than a year!]

    Also, once a pressure treated piece of lumber is cut or bored, the "exposed" meat of the lumber needs to be separately treated to preserve the protection.

    And, of course, without a termite shield, you have to be forever vigilant to knock down any "termite tubes" as the critters climb up the pressure treated wood in search of NONtreated wood (decking?) above.

  2. #22
    I've personally buried treated posts, pulled them out 15 years later and they were in the same condition that I buried them.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    I've personally buried treated posts, pulled them out 15 years later and they were in the same condition that I buried them.
    Automation is in AZ. Their termites are famous.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  4. #24

    Not true.

    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    Even pressure treated wood isn't "termite proof" (not just "resistant"). It's a common problem that we have, here, and any "wood product" in contact with the soil WILL fail, over time.

    [UNtreated lumber will be visibly compromised in less than a year!]

    Also, once a pressure treated piece of lumber is cut or bored, the "exposed" meat of the lumber needs to be separately treated to preserve the protection.

    And, of course, without a termite shield, you have to be forever vigilant to knock down any "termite tubes" as the critters climb up the pressure treated wood in search of NONtreated wood (decking?) above.
    Not true!

    The year 1987 my deck and ramp was built with Wolvenzised lumber which at that time had a 25 year warranty. Today's pressure treated woods have a lifetime warranty against termite infestation.

    You do not have to treat wood again if you cut it or drill holes in it. The wood is put in a pressure tank and impregnated with a preservative that has arsenic in it. Under extreme pressure the preservative goes all the way to the core of the wood.

    The way my contractor put my posts in the ground was first he used a post hole digger and drilled all the holes in the ground below frost line. Then he dipped 48" of the 4x4 into a tar drum. Let dry. Centered 4x4 post in hole then filled around it with cement. I've had no wood rot on any posts. Today they do it differently and some deck materials are made of plastic-type boards.

    The 2x2 safety arm was broken at the time this picture was taken and has been replaced with a new 2x2 to prevent me from tumbling down the stairs. I live next door to an elementary and middle school and one problem I do have is the children like to run and play on the deck and ramp.

    Also note there are no balusters under or on the hand rail. The hand rail is 22" tall and my knees hit the hand rail to prevent me from going over the deck. The reason for no balusters in the winter time when it snows all I have to do is just push the snow off the deck no lifting involved.

    Here's a picture of the deck from last July the deck portion in front of my house. The ramp is on the other side of the house going to the drive way. You see the preservative has weathered away over the years. It is suppose to green in color not honey brown.

    Ti
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    I've personally buried treated posts, pulled them out 15 years later and they were in the same condition that I buried them.
    That's specious reasoning. I've never been bitten by a lion so that proves the deodorant that I wear also acts as a lion repellant! (the fact that there are no lions, here, shouldn't factor into the equation!)

    A wooden pressure-treated wooden post (~6-8" dia) planted in the ground, here, will need replacement in a few years.

    Untreated wood (e.g., a TREE BRANCH that has fallen on the ground) will show visible signs of "consumption" in less than a year. Any other cellulose-rich items will quickly find themselves covered with a uniform coating of "termite mud" (leaves, twigs, logs...). You'll even see (living!) tree trunks covered with mud "in broad daylight" all-around to a height of a couple of feet!

    I found a termite tube that climbed a brick wall inside my garage to a height of 7 ft behind a metal bookshelf before it could eat a cardboard box that was located on the top shelf of a METAL shelving unit.

    When it rains during Monsoon, the air is full of flying termites. The roof will be covered with their corpses the next morning.

    Do you really think that folks, here, wouldn't do something as simple as "buying pressure treated would" to avoid this sort of damage?
    Last edited by automation; 10-01-2018 at 12:58 AM.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by titanium4motion View Post
    Not true!

    The year 1987 my deck and ramp was built with Wolvenzised lumber which at that time had a 25 year warranty. Today's pressure treated woods have a lifetime warranty against termite infestation.
    https://www.thomaspestservices.com/b...-from-termites

    https://www.colonialpest.com/will-te...-treated-wood/

    https://www.orkin.com/termites/real-...etreated-wood/

    Do you think folks would incur the cost of building fences out of brick if they could erect them with wood? E.g., in prefabbed sections?
    "Hey, Joe, these folks have horrendous termite problems. Why don't we market our termite RESISTANT (not PROOF) products to them?"

    You do not have to treat wood again if you cut it or drill holes in it.
    The wood is put in a pressure tank and impregnated with a preservative that has arsenic in it.
    Under extreme pressure the preservative goes all the way to the core of the wood.
    To quote yourself: "Not true". This is 2018, not 1987.

    https://www.news-leader.com/story/li...enic/77200928/

    https://www.co.thurston.wa.us/health/ehhm/cca.html

    I'm fully aware of how pressure treated lumber is intended to be used. Back east, it was unfortunate if you encountered a termite infestation. Here, the air is full of the critters whenever it rains -- and, not just your neighbor's yard but yours, as well!

    I've been told they are a different kind of termite (species?) but haven't bothered to research it.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by nonoise View Post
    Automation is in AZ. Their termites are famous.
    The saying goes: "If you don't have termites, you WILL!"

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    770
    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    Excellent! But, I'm curious as to what you've done to protect against the elements, critters (termites), etc.

    E.g., the post closest to the house to YOUR left in the photo of you in the chair looks like it has no footer. And, I assume the others sit on the footers (with termite guards between) and not IN them?

    It also looks like a fair bit of lumber (joists) sits on the soil -- though I'm at a loss as to how you could avoid this, esp at the low end of the ramp (?)

    Also, what's your experience been with riding on the crushed stone? It is used almost universally, here (desert southwest) and can be tedious to navigate. Or, do you rely on paths that you've "worn" into it?



    Isn't that always the case?! Regardless of how many DECADES you may have kept it in storage??!

    Good luck with the rest of the build!
    The posts are just bolted to the joists. They don't rest on anything. The 4 ramp joists are about 18' long and rest on a concrete footing at the bottom of the ramp. Crushed stone is under and around the joists where they go below grade (below the ground).
    The wood is rated for ground contact. I don't know how long it will last before pests get to it! I put self adhesive waterproof flashing on the bottom cuts of the joists where they sit on concrete (just in case it helps prevent rot).
    The crushed stone isn't working for me. It's ok in some spots where there's not just larger stones and, as you say, it's been packed down. Maybe I'll get a load of what's called 2A modified stone to spread on the drive. It would be nice (and expensive) to get the driveway paved.
    Rich

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by pararich View Post
    The crushed stone isn't working for me. It's ok in some spots where there's not just larger stones and, as you say, it's been packed down. Maybe I'll get a load of what's called 2A modified stone to spread on the drive. It would be nice (and expensive) to get the driveway paved.
    I've decided that the thicker the "stone layer", the worse the traction. Wheels start kicking up stone instead of moving the chair. Then, the wheels start digging holes in the ground. I've not yet sorted out whether small stone ("pea gravel") might be better than the ~1" chunks we have. And, I'd like to see if fatter tires might make things better.

    Driveways are concrete, here -- but nowhere near as long as yours appears to be!

    You might look into laying down two parallel rows of 12" square "pavers" -- with centerlines spaced as far apart as your wheels are located. A neighbor did this to widen his driveway and it's navigable (though feels like you're riding a roller coaster as he didn't level the underlying soil, first).

  10. #30
    Rich, look into putting dense graded aggregate (DGA) over your crushed stone. When placed, tamped down, and after a few rains it'll be almost like concrete. Asphalt millings work even better but in some areas it may be considered as a hazardous material, unless it topped with pavement.

Similar Threads

  1. t7 here having a challenging time getting my legs in bed
    By michael5462 in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-07-2011, 11:10 AM
  2. Details about trial challenging Proposition 71
    By Wise Young in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-27-2006, 09:49 AM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-15-2004, 09:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •