Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Temperature control or lack of it

  1. #1

    Temperature control or lack of it

    Over 5 years post accident and my temperature control (or lack of it) is getting worse every year. I thought that last winter was bad but even in the middle of a warm UK summer with outside temperatures above 20?C I'm going hypothermic in the house wearing a tee shirt and thick hoodie, hood pulled over my head most days just to keep me a bit warmer. Today I've also got a blanket doubled up covering me and my body temperature is 34.5?c.

    Last winter I wore a lot of clothing plus a heated waistcoat which did help but I don't want to be using that in summer as I don't know what it will be like in winter.

    On very warm days I can over heat and it takes a lot to cool me, very rare this happens but we have had 30?c + temperatures. I start to cool down but it is almost a delayed action as I don't know that I have cooled too far until it is too late.

    I already struggle with living with an SCI but these side effects really do get me down.

    Any suggestions for how I can find a fix for this welcome.

  2. #2
    I'm an SCI + double amputee (RAK, LHemi). After the last round of surgery that took my pelvis, my docs said don't be surprised if my temperature regulation is out of whack. It definitely is. I get these weird hot flashes where I'll burn up and sweat continuously for 15 minutes or so before my body regulates. Haven't pinned it down but I feel like it might be when transitioning between a hot environment to a cold one. I also don't sleep with sheets anymore, AT ALL. Either a pair of boxer shorts or boxer shorts + a long sleeve shirt in a 67F degree apartment; I'd be freezing a few years ago.

    I'll also randomly start freezing in my apartment at times and have to bump the thermostat to 70F and throw on a thick sweatshirt, then reverse the process when I start sweating a bit later. There seems to be a very small "comfort window" that my body likes now.

    Seems we have similar experiences. I'm T12, what level are you? I just try and live with it, not sure if there's any "cure" outside of dressing for the occasion.

  3. #3
    Body temperature is controlled by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. The body senses warmth or coldness and sends a message to the brain to produce more or less internal heat. The hypothalamus will cause the heart to pump differently to control the amount of blood circulating. This can be pumping slightly faster or slower as well as the capillary’s opening to let the blood cool closer to the surface of the skin or tightening which keeps the blood warmer deeper inside the body.

    Symptoms of being too cold or hypothermia are increased pain, slowing of motor skills, tiredness, reduced blood pressure and heart rate. Drink warm water, cover with blankets and find a warm place.

    Your body temperature can be affected by other factors besides the environment. Medications can affect your body temperature. Anticoagulants or blood thinners, sedatives, pain medication such as opiods and some antispasmotics such as baclofen and valium can lead to feeling cold. Alcohol leads to increasing body coldness due to fluid shifts, impaired judgment and awareness. Hormones in both males and females can make you feel too cold or too warm.
    http://www.spinalcordinjury-paralysi...ic/11775/54840


    pbr
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  4. #4
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mrb View Post

    Any suggestions for how I can find a fix for this welcome.
    Unfortunately, there is no fix. You have to be proactive from the beginning. I keep a spray bottle close by and try to anticipate how long I will be outside and spray myself frequently. I keep multiple water bottles by the bed with a washcloth nearby so that if I get warm in bed (even with two fans and the house at 70F) I can wet the rag and place over my head or pat myself down. During the colder months I keep a fleece beenie near the bed so that if I get cold I can put it on in the middle of the night. I have overheated several times this year. The worst was when I was trying to do some pressure washing on the back patio and got fixated on the work and forgot to ice myself down. I spent the next day and a half in the bed. It sucks because I grew up cutting lawns, lifeguarding, and being outside the whole summer. Ten minutes in 90+ F degree weather and I'm toast..

  6. #6
    Thanks, I guess that I already knew there would be no easy fix and will have to deal with winter when it comes. I used to spend my life outdoors now it is a rare occasion to leave the house! I have the house so warm no-one can sit with me for very long.

    Interesting to hear baclofen has an impact as I am slowly weaning off it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    570
    I wear an under armour cold gear base layer under my shirt most of the year, as well as really thin fleece gloves when I'm inside somewhere and the a/c is too cold. My hands tend to get the coldest, so the gloves help alot, while still being thin enough to use my fingers to type, etc.

  8. #8
    I have found that keeping my ears and neck warm is key, for me. When I get the "quadri-thermia" I wear a knit cap or ear warmers/muff and a scarf. It looks crazy during Spring and Summer but my comfort is a higher priority than fashionable vanity.

    Also hot beverages seems to help... momentarily anyway.

  9. #9
    I wear thick hoodies a lot and pull the hood up to stop draughts, really notice the wind. Usually have a warm beanie hat as well.

Similar Threads

  1. Loss of Temperature Control
    By swordfish in forum Care
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-09-2010, 09:05 PM
  2. Temperature control in the bedroom?
    By Norm in forum Equipment
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-05-2007, 03:38 PM
  3. Temperature Control
    By peggy1 in forum Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-12-2004, 07:01 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-02-2004, 11:41 AM
  5. Temperature control
    By Emi2 in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-14-2002, 10:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •