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Thread: supository slime

  1. #21
    When I talk of magic bullets I’m referring to bisacodyl 10 mg suppositories and there are different formulations water and wax based. Talk to the pharmacist, read labels.

    Review your bowel programs based on level of injury, activity, food and water intake and other oral medications or supplements you are taking for your bowel program. There could be many different issues affecting your bowel program.

    use what works for you

    best of luck - keep us posted

    pbr
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    I have used bullets that were given to me that are over 5 years old and they still work fine.
    I have used Magic Bullets (brand name of a bisacodyl suppository that has a polypropylene glycol base, i.e., water soluble) that are a while beyond their use by date and they have worked just fine. My point about the hospital pharmacy during a hospital stay is that if you bring your own supply of suppositories, make sure they have a current date. Otherwise the pharmacy will not clear the out of date suppositories for use by the hospital staff while you are in the hospital.

    Once, during a 7 day hospital stay, NL brought in a few suppositories. A couple of them were beyond their use by date. The pharmacy confiscated the out of date suppositories and would only return them to me upon my release from the hospital.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Once, during a 7 day hospital stay, NL brought in a few suppositories. A couple of them were beyond their use by date. The pharmacy confiscated the out of date suppositories and would only return them to me upon my release from the hospital.
    Technically I’m pretty sure they’re not allowed to do this. While they’re not obligated to use any medications the patient provides (and prohibited from doing so if the medication is expired), they can’t hold your private property if you request it back. Maybe they wouldn’t give it to NL as the patient, but if you said something along the lines of “I’m pretty sure that’s my personal property, isn’t it theft if you take it without my permission or refuse to return in? Maybe we should ask the hospital police about the technicalities” in a pleasant, but firm manner I bet your belongings would reappear shortly.

    Threatening to sue never works. Nurses and doctors hear people threatening to sue ten times a day. But if you ask in a collaborative and polite manner about possible violations of the law (such as theft here) and ask to involve another department like legal or the hospital police (not threatening to “call the cops” on them, just asking if you should ask the hospital’s police for their take on the subject) things magically start working. Pharmacy doesn’t want to give you an expired Med back while you’re in the hospital, but they probably would rather give it back then explain to there hospital police why they are refusing to do so.

  4. #24
    I don’t believe hospitals are (legally) allowed to administer or allow/facilitate/collude with the administration of expired meds, whether prescription or OTC, but also they won’t keep them, because that is (also) against the law. In general, hospitals won’t return meds you show up with or bring in until you discharge, and they really won’t provide them to family members if they anticipate for any reason that the family member will enable you to take them. Prior to my injury I was privy to a couple of scenes between folks, their families, hospital and university police and legal and medical staff over patients’ personal meds and it rapidly gets very ugly.

    I have an uptake disorder and some autoimmune mess and therefore some weird drug sensitivities. I show up for pre-admit with a letter from my doctor, a letter from a pharm.d, and prescription bottles of my meds to cover my scheduled stay plus 3 days and still I generally need a hospitalitist to review all of that and often an anesthesiologist to weigh in in order to stay on my (own legal minimal) meds instead of getting dumped onto the “formulary equivalents”. It’s been my experience that the more prepared and reasonable you are dealing with hospital policies the more flexible and accommodating folks are able to be.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Technically I’m pretty sure they’re not allowed to do this. While they’re not obligated to use any medications the patient provides (and prohibited from doing so if the medication is expired), they can’t hold your private property if you request it back. Maybe they wouldn’t give it to NL as the patient, but if you said something along the lines of “I’m pretty sure that’s my personal property, isn’t it theft if you take it without my permission or refuse to return in? Maybe we should ask the hospital police about the technicalities” in a pleasant, but firm manner I bet your belongings would reappear shortly.

    Threatening to sue never works. Nurses and doctors hear people threatening to sue ten times a day. But if you ask in a collaborative and polite manner about possible violations of the law (such as theft here) and ask to involve another department like legal or the hospital police (not threatening to “call the cops” on them, just asking if you should ask the hospital’s police for their take on the subject) things magically start working. Pharmacy doesn’t want to give you an expired Med back while you’re in the hospital, but they probably would rather give it back then explain to there hospital police why they are refusing to do so.
    They absolutely can take your meds and supplements. They are required to.

  6. #26
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    The beyond use date Magic Bullets were held by the Pharmacy Department. When I was released from the hospital the Magic Bullets were returned to me.

    The reason given for holding the suppositories is that they were beyond their use date and could not be administered in the hospital. There were a couple suppositories that were not beyond the use date and they allowed those to be used during my stay. The nursing staff did not participate in the bowel program. NL did the program while I was in the hospital (brought in my own commode chair). No nurse in sight.

  7. #27
    i got these via ups and they sat out on the porch in a box in the heat all day they were kinda melted when i got them i put them in fridge they hardened back up could that be the reason im having troubles i hardly ever had troubles b4
    to alcohol the cause of-and solution to-all of lifes problems [homer simpson]

  8. #28
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    From the Frequently Asked Questions (https://www.conceptsinconfidence.com...:faqs&Itemid=4) on the Concepts in Confidence, makers/distibutors of Magic Bullet suppositories:

    There is no discussion about what happens to the suppositories if they get too warm. It may be worth a call to Concepts in Confidence and ask them to explain.

    Should Magic Bullet be stored in the refrigerator?


    Magic Bullets only need to be refrigerated if the household temperature goes above 76 degrees. It is not recommended that they ever be frozen. Freezing can destroy the effectiveness of the active ingredient rendering the Magic Bullet useless.

  9. #29
    Magic bullet ( Bisacodyl) is a chemical irritant at that is how it makes the bowels move. Therefore more mucous is produced. Less with water base but still can occur. Enemeez does not use a chemical irritant and dig stim is a mechanical so no mucous drainage.

    CWO
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #30
    I do my bowel routine every other morning before I go in the shower. In the shower i spray some water up my butthole to get all the gunk out, and havent had any issues with discharge. By doing this it gets all the chemicals out so the bowel is no longer irritated.
    complete t6. injured skiing nov 2017.

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