Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Do you guys have a to do list for your caregivers?

  1. #1

    Post Do you guys have a to do list for your caregivers?

    I recently wrote one up, here is a sample.






    Do you guys have any ideas on what to add Or have your own to do list to share?
    C5/C6 Complete since 08/22/09

  2. #2
    Yes, I think this is a good idea. It worked very well for the less motivated caregivers.

    If you can believe, our list started with "Wash your hands...." and "take off your shoes....". They were needed.

    We also had a light cleaning of the bathroom often and/or any area you sit to cath.

    Laundry once a week

    Wash dishes

    Bring in the mail.

    Reminders to take pills at certain times.

    Sometimes assisting with meal prep, or a trip to the store.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    East Bay/San Francisco
    Posts
    8,866
    "Take off your shoes."

    I know many people and cultures prefer that people do not wear shoes inside the house. However, with an outside caregiver, I wonder if this request is really a good one for several reasons.
    1. Some people don't have the best bathing practice, wear shoes in which their feet sweat, or have a medical condition and their feet can have an odor when they remove their shoes. I remember sitting at a table in a meeting and one of the attendees slipped off his/her shoes. Soon, there was uncomfortable fidgeting, and looks around the table as the odor of this person's feet "perfumed" the room.
    2. Care workers spend a lot of time on their feet working for us. Having supportive shoes reduces fatigue, helps with back pain, and helps keep a worker from slipping and falling, injuring themselves or the person for whom they are caring.
    3. Shoes are worn for safety reasons to protect feet from objects on the floor or metal on a bed frame, stubbed toes, broken glass if something is dropped, and from cold temperatures.
    4. Someone who uses a wheelchair usually doesn't have an indoor and an outdoor chair and/or doesn't remove and replace tires and casters when they come in from being outdoors. I would guess that more soil is tracked into the house on the tires of a wheelchair than on the soles of someone's shoes.

    In light of these, it seems odd, if not unreasonable, to request that a caregiver remove their shoes.

    Maybe a better approach would be non skid shoe covers, worn inside only or ask the caregiver to have a pair of shoes that they only wear inside the house. We used to have a carpet cleaner who would change into an athletic shoe that was reserved for wearing inside only when he would clean the carpets in a house.

  4. #4
    So, this isn't really worth a post for the purposes of this thread, but of course we make adjustments for each person who is a regular caregiver. They either have a pair of slippers or house only shoes if they prefer that. But no outside shoes in the house. We've never had a person complain or dislike it.

    My father's house is a no shoes house. In our part of the country, lots of snow/rain. It just is not polite to expect that you can walk around someone's clean house in dirty/wet etc.. shoes. It really shocks me when people walk right in without hesitating. My father walks with crutches and it is extremely dangerous if there is even a drop of water on the floor.

    My father also has an immunodeficiency and his house is kept clean very clean.

    I guess we're just odd and unreasonable.

    And they hate the shoe covers. Those are for visiting workmen etc.. They are not very safe in a house with all wood floors.
    Last edited by hlh; 07-11-2018 at 05:34 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    East Bay/San Francisco
    Posts
    8,866
    A member of Care Cure Community, who isn't here much anymore included these task in a contract she wrote for her husband's care:
    Primary Duties
    Range of motion exercises (1 hour)
    Grooming (teeth brushing, shaving, clipping nails, putting on lotion, positioning, etc) ? 30 mins
    Bathing (shower or bath, must use overhead lift system) ? 1 hour
    Urinary and bowel care (empty and change catheters, wash out catheter bags, digital stimulation to evacuate bowels) ? 30 mins
    Preparing food for and feeding (employee not expected to cook for other family members) ? 30 mins
    Dressing and putting into / out of wheelchair (must use overhead lifting system) ? 30 mins
    Driving to appointments, social activities, etc using employer-provided transportation ? actual time based

    Secondary Duties when caregiving duties are completed, in addition to caregiving duties or instead of caregiving duties, include but are not limited to the list below. Depending on the task, the employee will be given guidance on the amount of time to spend on these tasks when asked to perform task.
    Washing dishes
    Washing and folding family laundry Purchasing and putting away groceries Walking dogs
    Straightening of shared living areas
    Child care ? after school and track-out babysitting for minor child following parenting principles as directed by employer
    Running errands (groceries, drug store, general shopping, pick up dry-cleaning, etc)

    NL has a document that is a work in progress and she might not be happy that I am sharing it with anyone, but actually I think it is a pretty good account of what and how she does things. It is a good short introduction for a caregiver and an excellent reminder to me of what I require, if something should happen to her (God forbid) and I would have to call in emergency help.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    I think a list is a great idea. And be as specific as you can, at least for new or temporary caregivers. It should be tailored to meet your needs, and not the needs of the caregiver, although I am sure that some people are good at negotiating out things that may or may not be in their realm.

    I would encourage everyone to think about safety with their caregivers. For example, asking someone to transfer you without non-skid shoes on, could be a huge safety hazard for both of you. You may want to have your caregiver change their shoes when they come in, but please don't ask them to be unsafe.

    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    East Bay/San Francisco
    Posts
    8,866
    Quote Originally Posted by hlh View Post
    I guess we're just odd and unreasonable.
    I didn't say you were, I said, maybe your request was odd and unreasonable, especially if you are unwilling to make an accommodation for health and safety.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    I didn't say you were, I said, maybe your request was odd and unreasonable, especially if you are unwilling to make an accommodation for health and safety.
    oh please...

  9. #9
    We had a schedule/list of duties included in the job description for each of my mother's PCAs, which was presented to them each when interviewing, and appended this to their contract if hired. Kept it handy for evaluating performance and giving feedback to the PCA on their work, and justification for termination if not followed.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    East Bay/San Francisco
    Posts
    8,866
    Quote Originally Posted by hlh View Post
    oh please...
    ?????????????

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-03-2015, 12:17 PM
  2. where do you guys post ads for caregivers?
    By sierramistyum in forum Caregiving
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-15-2015, 01:15 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-28-2003, 09:25 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-21-2001, 03:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •