Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: SCI levels for AD

  1. #1

    SCI levels for AD

    I've always been told I'm too low an injury to acquire AD (T11 complete) however I feel certain I have had two episodes in my 39 years and again tonight. I suppose it was minor compared to some but after refreshing myself on the topic via online info, I am questioning it.

    I've been dealing with constipation since being fed so many doses of antibiotics over the past year with the wound and UTIs from foley. My gut is still trying to repair itself and I'm doing everything possible but constipation is part of my drama for now.

    I check my BP several times a day as I am charting it for my doc. During this episode tonight it did shoot up pretty high (for me) at 144/95 and my pulse was high, I thought it should be low with AD. I've been following Keto recently and have had great success with weight loss and my BP has lowered from mid to high 130s (systolic) down to low 120s since I've been following it. So for it to shoot up and the awful feelings I experienced, I know it was AD. But again, I ask, am I really too low an injury to ever get AD?

  2. #2
    While those at risk for AD usually have spinal cord damage at T7 or above, there have been cases of AD reported in those injured as low as T10.

    AD is characterized by a HIGH (not low) blood pressure. Most often the pulse with be low with AD, although this is not universally the case. Unless you have a systolic blood pressure rise of at least 40 mm Hg above your normal baseline, it does not meet diagnostic criteria for AD. Other symptoms such as sweating, nasal congestion, flushing, etc. can be associated with AD, but also with other conditions, such as orthostatic hypotension, which is also due to autonomic dysfunction, but not due to autonomic dysreflexia (AD).

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Thanks, as always KLD.
    My 'symptoms' have always been rapid heart beat, clamy skin head to toe and light-headed. I also once felt I would almost pass out. All three times were when I was having a bowel movement yet the occurred several years apart. Maybe just a systemic reaction to the bowel movement?

  4. #4
    Much more likely to be orthostatic hypotension, not AD.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    Senior Member zagam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Western Australia - Hammer wielding daemon
    Posts
    619
    I am T12 and T10, but found out I had a pontine infarct and GP said that I could get AD and have probably had it a few times. Originally pons was thought to be shrinking due to the spinal cord injury, but the injury was seen in recent MRI.

    A C0 quad! (Pontine infarcts can be bad and result in locked-in syndrome or pine wood box, better to avoid.)

    TEDs, full bladder, full bowel or spastic legs too hot have caused it.

    Reduced sensation in left hand (so drop things) and now spaz in both hands.

    I know the diff between syncope and waking up on the floor and AD. Syncope is low BP and the lights go out. AD is high BP and you feel bad with the list of symptoms.

  6. #6
    The pons is part of the brain. While pontine strokes can result in quadriplegia, it is not a part of the spinal cord, and thus, is not a spinal cord injury, but a brain injury. The spinal cord begins just below the pons, as the cord exits from the foreman magnum (skull).

    Autonomic dysfunction can result from damage to the pons and other areas of the brain stem. Signs and symptoms of AD are not different for those who have it due to pons or brainstem injury than it is for those with SCI at T7 or above.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

Similar Threads

  1. Low Sodium Levels
    By march1986 in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-26-2010, 04:53 PM
  2. sci levels
    By vjls in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-03-2009, 09:15 AM
  3. Colesteral Levels?
    By Curt Leatherbee in forum Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-01-2003, 08:48 PM
  4. 3 LEVELS
    By davidh in forum Cure
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-10-2003, 03:42 PM
  5. Pottassium Levels
    By Raven in forum Care
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-07-2002, 02:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •