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Thread: Windows Help!

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    Does Reader save the text as individual "objects" on a different "layer" above the image?

    For example, if you "type whatever you want", and then go somewhere else and "type something else", can you THEN go back and "edit' the "typed whatever you want" to say "type something you need"? Likewise, can you drag the typed text around the page after you've "gone somewhere else"?

    (I.e., does the text become part of the image after you "go somewhere else" to do something else? Or, does it retain its independence?)

    Acrobat "behaves" so I would hope that Reader does as well (Reader is free but Acrobat costs)
    Once you have pressed enter after typing your text it becomes part of the image. You cannot edit it afterwards.
    T4 complete since 30 April 2012

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by TheVillageIdiot View Post
    Once you have pressed enter after typing your text it becomes part of the image. You cannot edit it afterwards.
    Oh, that's unfortunate! That's the problem with the "paint" kludge I suggested upthread -- "bearable" if you only rarely need to do this sort of thing.

    Acrobat has a "typewriter" tool that lets you type on a layer (floating) above the image. And, each thing that you type becomes a separate entity. So, I could type "this stuff", then position the mouse above the quoted "paint", above, and insert "er" after the final 't' (e.g., painter).

    Additionally, I can drag that word to some other place on the page, change the font (without retyping the text), etc.

    It sounds like LHB might be wise to explore something like Acrobat (I use "Acrobat 9 Pro Extended", FWIW). It has provisions whereby it will automagically add "fillable fields" to a document that you've created (or scanned). So, you can tweek the position, size, font, etc. of those fields ONCE and save the document as a "master template" of sorts. Then, each time you need to fill out another copy/instance of that form, all you have to do is click in the appropriate field and start typing -- you don't have to "move" text snipets around the screen.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by automation View Post
    It sounds like LHB might be wise to explore something like Acrobat (I use "Acrobat 9 Pro Extended", FWIW). It has provisions whereby it will automagically add "fillable fields" to a document that you've created (or scanned). So, you can tweek the position, size, font, etc. of those fields ONCE and save the document as a "master template" of sorts. Then, each time you need to fill out another copy/instance of that form, all you have to do is click in the appropriate field and start typing -- you don't have to "move" text snipets around the screen.
    I did a "screen snapshot" of the login dialog for this website (as a TIF file -- similar to what you'd get from a scanner). Then, created a PDF from this in Acrobat and told the "form wizard" to identify the likely fields in that "image". In the attached login1.pdf, you can see that it screwed up and created four fields instead of the obvious two! I then manually deleted the two superfluous fields to create the login2.pdf document.

    Unfortunately, I forgot to save them with "permission" for YOU to save them after you've filled them in! But, you can, at least, see that they are easy to fill in and you can print them before you exit Reader (you don't need Acrobat in order to fill the forms in). Note that you can go back and edit the contents of either field as often as you wish.
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  4. #24
    Senior Member zagam's Avatar
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    Windows Help!

    Take the red pill next time.

    Microsoft doesn't use standard ASCII codes for punctuation.

    Use nothing but letters and/or digits in username and password.

    The strongest passwords are 4 random words separated by a single space. Only use a capital letter with a proper noun.

    I use a different 4-word passphrase on each service. If the service has silly limits then I use a very weak one.

    The worst ones have silly characters and are usually based on a single dictionary word with one or two extra characters. The Crack software targets these silly William E. Burr passwords very quickly.

    outhouses umpires incendiary devour
    haggard jaguars prescriptions underdogs
    passports faithfulness customise reputation
    iceberg commended otters haywire
    downright yesterdays microorganism convalescence
    totems lusts confiscates chunkier

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