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Thread: Blood test to get during annual physical

  1. #1
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Blood test to get during annual physical

    SCI nurse,

    What blood tests should I get during my annual physical?

    Thank you.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    My doctor orders:
    CBC - Complete Blood Count (includes)
    • Red blood cells, which carry oxygen
    • White blood cells, which fight infection
    • Hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells
    • Hematocrit, the proportion of red blood cells to the fluid component, or plasma, in your blood
    • Platelets, which help with blood clotting


    CMP - Complete Metabolic Panel (includes)
    Glucose - energy source for the body; a steady supply must be available for use, and a relatively constant level of glucose must be maintained in the blood.
    Calcium - one of the most important minerals in the body; it is essential for the proper functioning of muscles, nerves, and the heart and is required in blood clotting and in the formation of bones.
    Proteins
    Albumin - a small protein produced in the liver; the major protein in serum
    Total Protein - measures albumin as well as all other proteins in serum
    Electrolytes
    Sodium - vital to normal body processes, including nerve and muscle function
    Potassium - vital to cell metabolism and muscle function
    CO2 (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate) - helps to maintain the body's acid-base balance (pH)
    Chloride - helps to regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base balance
    Glucose - energy source for the body; a steady supply must be available for use, and a relatively constant level of glucose must be maintained in the blood.
    Calcium - one of the most important minerals in the body; it is essential for the proper functioning of muscles, nerves, and the heart and is required in blood clotting and in the formation of bones.
    Proteins
    Albumin - a small protein produced in the liver; the major protein in serum
    Total Protein - measures albumin as well as all other proteins in serum
    Electrolytes
    Sodium - vital to normal body processes, including nerve and muscle function
    Potassium - vital to cell metabolism and muscle function
    CO2 (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate) - helps to maintain the body's acid-base balance (pH)
    Chloride - helps to regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base balance
    Kidney Tests
    BUN (blood urea nitrogen) - waste product filtered out of the blood by the kidneys; conditions that affect the kidney have the potential to affect the amount of urea in the blood.
    Creatinine - waste product produced in the muscles; it is filtered out of the blood by the kidneys so blood levels are a good indication of how well the kidneys are working.
    Liver Tests
    ALP (alkaline phosphatase) - enzyme found in the liver and other tissues, bone; elevated levels of ALP in the blood are most commonly caused by liver disease or bone disorders.
    ALT (alanine amino transferase, also called SGPT) - enzyme found mostly in the cells of the liver and kidney; a useful test for detecting liver damage
    AST (aspartate amino transferase, also called SGOT) - enzyme found especially in cells in the heart and liver; also a useful test for detecting liver damage
    Bilirubin - waste product produced by the liver as it breaks down and recycles aged red blood cells

    BUN (blood urea nitrogen) - waste product filtered out of the blood by the kidneys; conditions that affect the kidney have the potential to affect the amount of urea in the blood.
    Creatinine - waste product produced in the muscles; it is filtered out of the blood by the kidneys so blood levels are a good indication of how well the kidneys are working.

    Lipid Panel (includes)

    • Total cholesterol. This is a sum of your blood's cholesterol content.
    • High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. This is sometimes called the "good" cholesterol because it helps carry away LDL cholesterol, thus keeping arteries open and your blood flowing more freely.
    • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. This is sometimes called the "bad" cholesterol. Too much of it in your blood causes the buildup of fatty deposits (plaques) in your arteries (atherosclerosis), which reduces blood flow. These plaques sometimes rupture and can lead to a heart attack or stroke.
    • Triglycerides. Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn't need into triglycerides, which are stored in fat cells. High triglyceride levels are associated with several factors, including being overweight, eating too many sweets or drinking too much alcohol, smoking, being sedentary, or having diabetes with elevated blood sugar levels.


    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

    For Men: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA)

    Other tests you may need:
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention suggests an at risk Hepatitis C blood test for those born between 1945-1965.
    Blood test to determine if you have had chicken pox, to determine if you need the Shingles vaccinations.

  3. #3
    Gj has provided great info. depending on above results doctor can order more if needed. for female hormone levels are also added if necessary. as well as a pregnancy test.
    T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

  4. #4
    I'd be interested to hear if SCI nurse has any SCI specific labs they recommend, as far as I'm aware there are not any SCI specific labs you need, and if you cath and aren't having urinary symptoms (frequency, leakage, pain if you have sensation, fever, etc) it probably does more harm than good to check a urinalysis.

    Also there is some debate (not much), but I hope to Jesus that regular dudes aren't getting their PSA checked. I mean if you've got a complete injury we're probably one of the only demographics for which it makes sense to check a PSA. Back in the day when they recommended checking everyone's PSA we used to make several hundred guys impotent (due to unnecessary biopsies and surgeries) for every life we saved (the vast majority of people with prostate cancer die with it not from it and never know they have it unless they get tested, biopsies and surgeries are dangerous and frequently result in impotency in neurologically normal men for a disease that is very unlikely to kill you). Totally not worth it in the vast majority of guys opinions... but if you got a complete injury you aint got much to lose on that front so it would actually make sense for you to get it tested. But regarding what I just said about normal guys, maybe it's all changed, it's been four or five years since I studied all that junk (no pun intended).

  5. #5
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    It is important that men have a digital prostate exam, which if course is not a blood test. But if you present with prostate enlargement in a digital exam, the PSA Prostate-specific antigen may be very important, if for nothing more than a marker at a point in time.

  6. #6
    I agree with the list above. A CBC, chem 20, and metabolic panel (which should be done fasting) are excellent ideas for everyone. People with SCI should also have a creatinine clearance study done, which involves collection of a 24 hour urine, along with a blood test done during that same period of time. We also include a pre-albumin and CRP (C-reactive protein).

    We don't recommend a routine chicken pox titer, since the shingles vaccine is recommended for pretty much everyone who is over the age of 60, regardless of previous chicken pox history.

    We also recommend a PSA for all men with SCI over the age of 40, regardless of their digital prostate exam results. Elevated levels should be further evaluated, not used as a criteria for prostate surgery. PSA can also be elevated in men with chronic prostatitis, which can occur in men with SCI.

    Screening for diabetes is important for people with SCI, as there is a higher rate among people with SCI than in the general population. The same is true for dyslipidemia (abnormal cholesterol, HDL, and LDL levels).

    A liver panel is also advised for most people with SCI as many of the medications used by people with SCI can be liver toxic.

    Testing for hep C is a good idea if you are in the listed age group, but generally this is just a one-time thing, not annual, unless you are in a high risk group (IV drug user, recent blood transfusion or exposure, etc.).

    In addition to blood tests, you should also have a complete urinalysis, and a culture and sensitivity of your urine. Additional radiologic exams are also recommended.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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