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Thread: Researchers repair acute spinal cord injury in monkeys

  1. #11
    I know you're not terribly interested, but if you're paying attention, you see there's a reason the lab would go to all the trouble and high expense to take their injury model from rat to the primate model (closer to humans) that was reported above. These are the steps taken by a lab intent on bringing a therapy forward for a spinal cord injury trial and eventually to market if found worthy.

    The authors write, "This study using nonhuman primates represents a substantial advancement in translating our initial study using rodents to human therapy." While the study was focused on the treatment of acute injury, they believe it will also prove applicable in treatment of chronic spinal injury.

    Here is the rat model results listed below in October 2015. Take a moment to read the full publication linked below.

    Full Publication: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4629318/


    SIGNIFICANCE


    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating medical condition with no cure at present time. In this study we have discovered that a biodegradable material, chitosan, when loaded with, Neurotrophin-3 (NT3), allowed for slow release of this neural trophic factor, providing an optimal microenvironment for regeneration. NT3-chitosan, when inserted into a 5 mm gap of completely transected and excised rat thoracic spinal cord, elicited robust activation of endogenous neural stem cells forming functional neural networks, which interconnected the severed ascending and descending axons, resulting in sensory and motor behavioral recovery. Our study suggests that enhancing endogenous neurogenesis by NT3-chitosan could be a novel strategy for treatment of SCI.

    ABSTRACT

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) hold the key to neural regeneration through proper activation, differentiation, and maturation, to establish nascent neural networks, which can be integrated into damaged neural circuits to repair function. However, the CNS injury microenvironment is often inhibitory and inflammatory, limiting the ability of activated NSCs to differentiate into neurons and form nascent circuits. Here we report that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-coupled chitosan biomaterial, when inserted into a 5-mm gap of completely transected and excised rat thoracic spinal cord, elicited robust activation of endogenous NSCs in the injured spinal cord. Through slow release of NT3, the biomaterial attracted NSCs to migrate into the lesion area, differentiate into neurons, and form functional neural networks, which interconnected severed ascending and descending axons, resulting in sensory and motor behavioral recovery. Our study suggests that enhancing endogenous neurogenesis could be a novel strategy for treatment of spinal cord injury.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 06-08-2018 at 10:46 PM.

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