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Thread: My first flight post-injury

  1. #31
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    I have mixed feelings on the Eagle Lift. Negatives IMO: quite time consuming (I'd almost prefer the quick lift and your done routine...and this coming from someone who still has battle scars from lifts gone bad...thanks United). This video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlaIjvx1-OQ almost reminds me of the "how many people does it take to change a lightbulb" question. How does this device navigate the threshold between plane/jetway?

    Pros IMO: I'm 6'4, 185 lbs of dead weight. Often assisted by staff who physically are no match for that transfer of weight. This would alleviate that. would it be possible to sit in a window seat with this device? That would be a big + in my opinion. In the link I posted, the passenger is being seated in what looks like a business class seat. When I earn enough reward miles for long flights I prefer such seats, but given the configuration, a standard 2-man lift is even more difficult. This would help it seems.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    I have mixed feelings on the Eagle Lift. Negatives IMO: quite time consuming (I'd almost prefer the quick lift and your done routine...and this coming from someone who still has battle scars from lifts gone bad...thanks United). This video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlaIjvx1-OQ almost reminds me of the "how many people does it take to change a lightbulb" question. How does this device navigate the threshold between plane/jetway?

    Pros IMO: I'm 6'4, 185 lbs of dead weight. Often assisted by staff who physically are no match for that transfer of weight. This would alleviate that. would it be possible to sit in a window seat with this device? That would be a big + in my opinion. In the link I posted, the passenger is being seated in what looks like a business class seat. When I earn enough reward miles for long flights I prefer such seats, but given the configuration, a standard 2-man lift is even more difficult. This would help it seems.
    If they were to train the people that would be using the lift you wouldn't have so many people standing around and it would be quicker. The way it looked in the video they could put you in any seat.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
    If they were to train the people that would be using the lift you wouldn't have so many people standing around and it would be quicker. The way it looked in the video they could put you in any seat.
    You can youtube a bunch of videos now using the lift and they are all pretty much the same.

    For me Ill keep the original way with 2 attendants once I am loaded on to the plane it takes less then a minute tops.

    Fast, simple and less intrusive...


  4. #34

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  6. #36
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    What is your injury again? How much do you way? I'm a 230 pound c3c4 quad with no balance. It's hard to trust people that don't even know me to transfer me into the aisle chair then into the plane seat.

  7. #37
    When I fly I try and get seat 1B or 1C, I can usually get my chair to those seats and transfer w/o an aisle chair. Caveats:

    - I am a T8 para w/ good transferring skills
    - My chair is 16 inches wide (TiLite TR3 w/ 4 degree camber) and I scrape the sides so that is pretty much as wide as you can get.
    - I fly delta pretty much exclusively.
    - I can afford to spend the extra dollars to fly business class.

  8. #38
    Just about any commercial plane (except regional jets and smaller) has first row isle seats that you can get close enough to transfer with a 24" wide wheelchair (16" seat width + 8" for the wheels) and zero camber. The transfer isn't easy. It would get increasingly more difficult with increasing camber. Who needs camber anyways? Cool looking. But pretty much useless off the court.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    Just about any commercial plane (except regional jets and smaller) has first row isle seats that you can get close enough to transfer with a 24" wide wheelchair (16" seat width + 8" for the wheels) and zero camber. The transfer isn't easy. It would get increasingly more difficult with increasing camber. Who needs camber anyways? Cool looking. But pretty much useless off the court.
    Unfortunately my Quickie 646SE is 25.75in wide. So I have to use the aisle chair.

  10. #40
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
    Unfortunately my Quickie 646SE is 25.75in wide. So I have to use the aisle chair.
    Unfortunately I haven't been on a plane yet where my chair would have been able to navigate the gap between the jetway and plane door. Either there is a gap, or a substantial height difference that a power chair couldn't navigate. That's a question I have with the Eagle lift...can it go over the gap, or would you have to load once inside the plane?

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