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Thread: Sitting on my left leg

  1. #1

    Sitting on my left leg

    Maybe someone can tell me, what happens if you pull a muscle in your core? Someone with a spinal cord injury already has no control of that area -- of course, each injury is different and some people do have more function than others.

    I'm an incomplete C6-7 quadriplegic. My left leg dropped off of an electric wheelchair footrest when a durable equipment rep tilted me clear back and raised the footrest. That action loosened the muscles/etc. on the left side core, so now my stomach leans left and my left side bulges out. Right after the incident, I was no longer able to transfer to my left. It has severely impacted my independence, attitude and physical well-being.

    The physiatrist that I see told me that she cannot help. An orthopedic group said they couldn't do anything for me. I found some other name of someone specializing in spine/orthopedics. He has switched to helping children and does not see adults.

    What can I do? I did find this -- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395751/ The effect of complex rehabilitation training for 12 weeks on trunk muscle function and spine deformation of patients with SCI
    Last edited by ouch; 04-05-2018 at 09:38 PM.

  2. #2
    So did the physiatrist recommend physical therapy?
    Do you have pain or loss of trunk/body balance/stability?

    pbr
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bigtop1's Avatar
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    With the bulging left side of the abdomen and the off set of the torso, it sounds like a hernia.
    I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    So did the physiatrist recommend physical therapy?
    Do you have pain or loss of trunk/body balance/stability?

    pbr
    When my physiatrist looked at my back, she just said, "Wow. You're not even symmetrical." I usually have to deal with the NP, but he finally sent me to her. That took a year. I go there every three months for pump refills and learned long ago to not try and get any answers. I come to carecure for answers or try to figure it out.

    I tried swimming. That did not help.. I'm worse now. I can't stop this pulling. The first session was land PT. She had me grabbing for a ball on each side. I tried it, knowing that it was going to just fire things up, which it did. When I try to stretch this out, it just comes back with a vengeance. I be willing to do any PT if it's going to help. I have plenty of strengths to do transfers. The problem is the region in that core area is totally unstable. It moves. And it's out of place. I can feel that I'm not sitting right..

    I'm stable as the tone is extremely high. It's torquing my back. When I get down in bed at night, my body is jammed up into a twisted position. The muscles aren't fluid moving. If that makes sense. My lower back has snapped, my back shoulder area and other areas. My legs are loose,, so I believe that the pump is working. It just doesn't seem to touch this torso area.. Something happened when that leg dropped.

    I don't know if it is a hip rotation pulled muscle or something else. When I am sitting in my chair, the left front area of my stomach is bulging out. I can take my right hand around to the right side of my back about the bellybutton level and there are no muscles there. They are all being pushed out that front left side.

    I am unable to stretch this out. When I sit on the bed, my stomach is pulling hard to the left.. If I try to stretch forward, it does zero good as those muscles are not in the right area.

    I didn't mention that when I eat, the tone increases. My primary physician thought that it probably had something do with my sympathetic nervous system, which I have to agree... but what ? No answers.
    Last edited by ouch; 04-06-2018 at 07:43 PM.

  5. #5
    It sounds to me like you need to have some imaging studies at this point, especially MRI of the dorsal and lumbar spine/abdomen and a flat plate of the abdomen. A doctor should also examine you for hernia, as bigtop1 states.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    It sounds to me like you need to have some imaging studies at this point, especially MRI of the dorsal and lumbar spine/abdomen and a flat plate of the abdomen. A doctor should also examine you for hernia, as bigtop1 states.
    I had an MRI and it was sent to my physiatrist. It would have shown a hernia I would think. Don't MRIs show muscle/ligament problems too? If I was playing for the NFL, they would pinpoint the problem.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ouch View Post
    I had an MRI and it was sent to my physiatrist. It would have shown a hernia I would think. Don't MRIs show muscle/ligament problems too? If I was playing for the NFL, they would pinpoint the problem.
    Hernias can usually be detected by palpating the abdomen, so if your doctor poked and prodded he would have found it. A sudden sharp movement like you experienced can cause stress fractures and soft tissue tears, which the MRI might show (depending on the type of MRI that was ordered). Your body could slowly heal itself, without anyone ever figuring out what caused the pain, but it's agonizing to wait and see if that's going to happen. I don't know if you have the option of seeing another physiatrist, but it doesn't sound like the one you have now pursued the matter. I've had very poor medical care, so again I can relate when you say you come here for answers - but it will probably take a good doc or PT to figure this one out. You're right about the NFL thing! Ain't it the truth.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  8. #8
    Any chance this is skeletal related, such as dislocated hip, herniated disk, etc.? Spine curving to the right can cause abdomen to splay to the left. Agree with Bonnette that further xrays may help identify what's going on.
    Keep asking questions and insisting on help.

  9. #9
    It's going to be a month, but will see a neuro Dr. in April. Maybe I can get some answers..

    It really feels like it is more of a dislocation. I can't believe how hard my muscles are pulling. Thanks for the help.

  10. #10
    I'm very glad that you'll be seeing a neurologist before too long. Dislocations are not so easy to identify, but if the neuro dosn't find a solution you might consider a GENTLE form of chiropractic that doesn't involve "cracking" the skeleton...better yet, seek out an osteopath trained in old school osteopathic manipulations.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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