Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34

Thread: getting old

  1. #11
    Thanks Brent K, very helpful videos. I like the ones that are 'equipment free' as sometimes even the easiest Theraband is tough on my elder shoulders.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by pete4sake View Post
    Hi All
    61 yrs and 33 yrs post T-8 para Here is a shocker My SCI doc said some one of my age should only do 2 to 4 transfers a day. Although I was surprised it made a lot of sense began quest for Power chair and lift vehicle the next day. Gotta work smarter instead of harder!
    I wonder if your SCI doctor could get through a typical day with 4 transfers......my husband, in his 70's does 10 in a typical day and that does not include transfers to van seat if he goes out. It does include a nap. I'm also in my 70's and do about 11 transfers a day, being female, extra transfers for toileting.

    If you just count getting out of bed, then toilet, maybe shower, then bed again at night, yeah, 6 might work.
    Totally agree with you about lift vehicle. You might want to check out the ZX1 power device which attaches to rigid frame wheelchair. I use mine for outdoor travel and pop it off my chair when in the house. So important to preserve shoulder function.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    I wonder if your SCI doctor could get through a typical day with 4 transfers......my husband, in his 70's does 10 in a typical day and that does not include transfers to van seat if he goes out. It does include a nap. I'm also in my 70's and do about 11 transfers a day, being female, extra transfers for toileting.

    If you just count getting out of bed, then toilet, maybe shower, then bed again at night, yeah, 6 might work.
    Totally agree with you about lift vehicle. You might want to check out the ZX1 power device which attaches to rigid frame wheelchair. I use mine for outdoor travel and pop it off my chair when in the house. So important to preserve shoulder function.
    Exactly. In a perfect world, 2-4 a day would be great. If you only get in and out of bed, and stop living your life, then you can keep transfers that low. Ridiculous.
    "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

  4. #14
    Well I guess my point is if he thinks 2 to 4 then maybe i shouldn't be doing 20. His point is to preserve shoulders and other joints that were not made for weight bearing. I think I can eliminate 10 to 12 by driving from a power chair. On the zx1 I think it is most likely a great solution. But as far as driving from it read other posts on here that may be difficult to dock etc. I do agree 2-4 is unrealistic it just got me thinking.. I also think it is important to cut back on the most difficult ones. If I don.t leave the house I can get by 6-8. But every errand i run add 4 so 3 errands = 20.
    Last edited by pete4sake; 03-28-2018 at 12:56 PM.

  5. #15
    Yes, docking the ZX1 for driving, sadly, does not appear to be perfected. I got one a few years ago when I got tired and embarrassed grabbing onto the back of hubby's wheelchair to be towed up a gentle hill to a restaurant. A light bulb went off and I ordered one soon after. I am able to transfer to seat of our full size van while hooked up to ZX1, then secure with bungee cords. I use the zx1 every time I'm outdoors.
    We keep a can of Pledge and a cloth handy to polish leather van seats for easy slide transfer. The 2 power seats enable us to do gravity transfers. My husband uses a transfer board (kept Pledged) when transferring out of van seat (he's tall and power seat at highest level, not quite a gravity transfer.) My transfers are all sliding rather than lifting up as I had done in the past.
    I'm told the power-add on is great for getting up mini van ramp.

    Must add: I really like this "getting old" thread. Don't know if there's many of us on CareCure.

  6. #16
    I am 80 and have 63 years as a C-7 complete quad. Most of that time was spent pushing a manual chair, including the 55+ lb. E&J wheelchairs that were "the" chair for serious wheeling until the 1980s. About 15 years ago I switched to a power assist, and about 6 years ago I had to go to a full power chair. At the same time I quit driving. Both were due to shoulder pain. The pain was especially severe when I had to make sharp turns when driving my van. It came to the point that I just winced and wanted to let go of the steering wheel. I did not want to risk an accident and perhaps make another SCI. I regret abusing my shoulders, but no one expected us to become oldtimers. There is a good deal of knowledge now, and I try to encourage younger SCIs to make maintaining shoulder health a priority, along with pressure sore prevention. There is a link to a very good manual dealing with shoulder health near the bottom of this post. Having to quit driving has been a major blow to my independence and quality of life. This aging process is like going through rehab in reverse.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
    I am 80 and have 63 years as a C-7 complete quad. Most of that time was spent pushing a manual chair, including the 55+ lb. E&J wheelchairs that were "the" chair for serious wheeling until the 1980s. About 15 years ago I switched to a power assist, and about 6 years ago I had to go to a full power chair. At the same time I quit driving. Both were due to shoulder pain. The pain was especially severe when I had to make sharp turns when driving my van. It came to the point that I just winced and wanted to let go of the steering wheel. I did not want to risk an accident and perhaps make another SCI. I regret abusing my shoulders, but no one expected us to become oldtimers. There is a good deal of knowledge now, and I try to encourage younger SCIs to make maintaining shoulder health a priority, along with pressure sore prevention. There is a link to a very good manual dealing with shoulder health near the bottom of this post. Having to quit driving has been a major blow to my independence and quality of life. This aging process is like going through rehab in reverse.
    Much respect to you, 55!They instilled fear n me at WWRC in 1972 to NOT get a pressure sore and, knock on wood, after almost 46 years, I've never had one. Did you know Dr. O'Hanlon when you were there? They didn't, however, warn us about shoulder wear.
    "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

  8. #18
    Never aware of 'shoulder health' until it crept up on me this year and got my undivided attention.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DeadEye View Post
    Much respect to you, 55!They instilled fear n me at WWRC in 1972 to NOT get a pressure sore and, knock on wood, after almost 46 years, I've never had one. Did you know Dr. O'Hanlon when you were there? They didn't, however, warn us about shoulder wear.
    Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  10. #20
    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Coastal Virginia
    Posts
    1,556
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
    Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
    I was injured in Vermont in 78’ , that same year I moved to Virginia after rehab. Years later when I went to work for a disability agency and met a lot of other wheelers it always impressed me how well most folks who had rehabbed at WWRC manage / managed their disability.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •