Standards for Minimally Invasive Treatments Published to Promote Patient Safety
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STANDARDS GUIDELINES MINIMALLY INVASIVE MEDICINE INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY
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Evidence-based standards for minimally invasive treatments are now available online. For the past 30 years, interventional radiologists have been responsible for much of the medical innovation and development of minimally invasive procedures in medicine.



Newswise - Evidence-based standards for minimally invasive treatments are now available online in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR). For the past 30 years, interventional radiologists have been responsible for much of the medical innovation and development of minimally invasive procedures in medicine, including developing and setting the standard to ensure the highest quality outcomes. Now the Society of Interventional Radiology has compiled and updated these evidence-based standards for excellence into one convenient supplement to JVIR, available at http://jvir.org, volume 14 issue 9, or in the clinical practice guidelines section at http://www.SIRweb.org.

Interventional radiologists guide catheters through the vascular system, other pathways in the body, or through the skin, to treat disease or tumors directly at the source, via a small nick in the skin and x-ray guidance. While no treatment is risk free, the risks of interventional procedures are far lower than the risks of open surgery, and are a major advance in medicine for patients.

Interventional radiologists have a unique blend of skills that foster innovation including fellowship training in interventional radiology along with board certification in diagnostic radiology. This combination enables them to quickly adapt diagnostic imaging expertise to pioneer nonsurgical treatments that are guided by imaging including:

- balloon angioplasty and stenting to treat peripheral arterial disease, saving patients from amputation or major surgery;
- nonsurgical ablation of tumors to kill cancer without harming the surrounding tissue;
- embolization therapy to stop hemorrhaging or to block the blood supply to a tumor;
- catheter-directed thrombolysis to clear blood clots, preventing disability from deep vein thrombosis and stroke; and
- carotid artery angioplasty and stenting to prevent stroke.

When it comes to the best practices for safely performing minimally invasive medicine, interventional radiologists pioneered the procedures and the standards for safety and quality. Patient safety was incorporated into the development of these advances because interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology training programs include radiation safety, radiation physics, the biological effects of radiation, and injury prevention. These published standards include criteria for adequate training for specific interventional procedures, as well as expected success and complication rates. The standards are used by the FDA, hospitals, state regulatory groups, and other medical specialists that are involved in the practice of interventional procedures.

Image-guided procedures have replaced surgery in many instances and, like many other important technological advances, are being adopted by many nonradiology medical specialties, many of whom have no formal training or significantly less formal training in radiation safety and radiation physics than do radiologists and interventional radiologists. The Society of Interventional Radiology is making this Journal publicly available online as a valuable reference.

About the Society of Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiology is the medical specialty devoted to advancing patient care through the innovative integration of clinical and imaging-based diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy. Interventional radiologists are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments performed using imaging guidance. Interventional radiology procedures are a major advance in medicine that do not require large incisions - only a nick in the skin about the size of a pencil tip - and offer less risk, less pain and shorter recovery times compared to open surgery. More information can be found at http://www.SIRweb.org.



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