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Thread: New York City for the disabled traveller

  1. #41
    "Roll Positive," I commend all that you do to promote and help people in our community and beyond. Travel is a wonderful past time and I do indeed encourage people to travel as much as they can.

    That said, I think you misunderstand why, I for one, and others, post about difficult and disappointing experiences. I only mean to suggest that you need to do your due diligence, plan to enjoy your trip, but be ready for the unforeseeable. That is just being realistic and prepares you to make adjustments as needed. My wife and I travel frequently, but now, after years of travel for business and pleasure, domestically and internationally, we prefer to travel in our van and enjoy what we have missed seeing in our region of the country. Yes, the experience in Chicago that I wrote about was years ago (as I wrote in the first sentence). Sure things change, accommodating the traveler with a disability has, for the most part, gotten better.

    In my post above, I wasn't saying avoid Chicage O'Hare Airport because I had this bad experience years ago. "Funklab" wasn't saying SuperShuttle is unreliable. We are saying be prepared to exercise a Plan B, because stuff can happen, no matter how many times you try to verify your plans. What I am saying is expect the best and prepare for the worst.

    Sorry "mrb" if these posts have hijacked your thread. Hopefully, we will get and you'll get some useful suggestions about what are must "sees" and "dos," how long in advance you need to make reservations for certain plays and restaurants, getting tickets for excursions and site seeing that will make your trip go smoothly. It would be great if we could hear about those little hidden gems that make a trip extra special.

    I'll once again refer to years ago...NL and I discovered the Forbes Museum in New York. It was a wonderful display of the collections of the late Malcolm Forbes, an American entrepreneur most prominently known as the publisher of Forbes magazine. He had a vast collection of toys soldiers and other figures set in vignettes, toy boats, Faberge eggs, a monopoly game made by Forbes' children featuring his vast empire of properties and businesses, and a large collection of letters and documents. I often recommended that to people going to New York City. Alas, it is no longer there, but surely there are similar under the radar things to see and do in the Big Apple.

    Happy early birthday to Mrs. "mrb."
    Last edited by gjnl; 03-25-2018 at 04:27 PM.

  2. #42
    It isn't a problem hijacking the thread it is always interesting to hear different perspectives. We had a lengthy discussion on the trip and I probably won't go as she doesn't want to spend her time looking after me, only other option would be to take 2 support workers which I can't afford to do plus she would still be restricted by my needs. Totally understand why she feels like that so have to accept her position.

    Getting back to travel, this is from Heathrow where I would have to transfer planes http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43536502 so I will need to allow more time in transit, another example of having to plan every bit of a trip.

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    "Roll Positive," I commend all that you do to promote and help people in our community and beyond. Travel is a wonderful past time and I do indeed encourage people to travel as much as they can.

    That said, I think you misunderstand why, I for one, and others, post about difficult and disappointing experiences. I only mean to suggest that you need to do your due diligence, plan to enjoy your trip, but be ready for the unforeseeable. That is just being realistic and prepares you to make adjustments as needed. My wife and I travel frequently, but now, after years of travel for business and pleasure, domestically and internationally, we prefer to travel in our van and enjoy what we have missed seeing in our region of the country. Yes, the experience in Chicago that I wrote about was years ago (as I wrote in the first sentence). Sure things change, accommodating the traveler with a disability has, for the most part, gotten better.

    In my post above, I wasn't saying avoid Chicage O'Hare Airport because I had this bad experience years ago. "Funklab" wasn't saying SuperShuttle is unreliable. We are saying be prepared to exercise a Plan B, because stuff can happen, no matter how many times you try to verify your plans. What I am saying is expect the best and prepare for the worst.

    Sorry "mrb" if these posts have hijacked your thread. Hopefully, we will get and you'll get some useful suggestions about what are must "sees" and "dos," how long in advance you need to make reservations for certain plays and restaurants, getting tickets for excursions and site seeing that will make your trip go smoothly. It would be great if we could hear about those little hidden gems that make a trip extra special.

    I'll once again refer to years ago...NL and I discovered the Forbes Museum in New York. It was a wonderful display of the collections of the late Malcolm Forbes, an American entrepreneur most prominently known as the publisher of Forbes magazine. He had a vast collection of toys soldiers and other figures set in vignettes, toy boats, Faberge eggs, a monopoly game made by Forbes' children featuring his vast empire of properties and businesses, and a large collection of letters and documents. I often recommended that to people going to New York City. Alas, it is no longer there, but surely there are similar under the radar things to see and do in the Big Apple.

    Happy early birthday to Mrs. "mrb."

    gjnl: I have followed your post and we just have a difference in lifestyles we don't need to agree or disagree its two different ways of getting things done.

    It's also a good reference that you two like to drive and we like to fly.

    This was a general statement that I think its pointless to bring up the negative as it doesn't really serve a purpose. Control what you can control!

    One can not prepare for all issues as even us as seasoned travelers will have curve balls thrown that you never thought about.

    When none travelers see a video or story on a disabled traveler in crisis then repost it...I dont see the point? We all heard the story on the news it just puts people on the fence about traveling back on the side of not wanting to travel.

    We agree on the plan B but personal experience is its more rare that things happen with just a little preparedness.

    Do things happen to us? Sure and we laugh about it now but at the time it was frustrating but we learned how to avoid it the next time and to fall back on the plan B

    Understand things can happen and just confirm arrangements the day of really helps, call to transportation, call to the hotel, simple and easy.

    Anytime an airport has a train or subway or light rail at the airport its best to plan you transportation around that and now years later Uber in Chicago and or Miami are a great way to get to where one needs to go.

    I was adding more current personal experience at both Chicago and Miami and NYC there is more ways for our community to get around.


    mrb: Sorry you are not going but would still look at going in the future. In this rare case I would suggest a travel agency that does accessible travel and make it easy to relax and not stress on the planning.


    http://www.executiveclasstravelers.c...erators.htm#us

    https://www.nycgo.com/plan-your-trip.../accessibility

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by RollPositive View Post
    Looking bigger picture...my Wife and I have helped so many people with in our community travel successfully that never knew they could travel. We have received text, calls, pictures of people on there new found journeys.

    From weddings, vacations, business, holidays etc. What some dont understand is there are 1000's of views of this site, former WCJ, WCD even FB groups that will never post just view so they see all the negatives people put out about damaging charis, hotel issues, accessible/none accessible issue etc.

    Most are posted by people that never travel or travel very very rarely. These post along with the fear of problems convince themselves out of trying.

    Can we search out the facts that support our view point? 100% that's what the internet is built on!

    I understand what you are saying but 75% doesnt mean anything?

    The subway system in New York is over 100 years old and the cost of retrofitting stops is just not possible.

    Can it be better it sure can...but is it doable the way it is now absolutely!

    Just this post alone we have people posting that are giving input but haven't used the subway or post from an experience years ago but dont mention specific timelines like 20 years ago I was in Boston, 15 years ago in San Francisco?

    What some may not understand as time goes by some of the challenges are addressed and or technology comes to play and makes some of the issue more simple.

    When we help people with there own trips we only use our personal experience.

    I have a friend here who went to New York for the 1st time with his Wife we talked for several months and they got there whole trip set up.

    They didnt use the subway but used WOW cab and I think Uber and they had a great time.

    Point being is the subway is only one part of the New York City transportation system.

    People still have trains, cabs, buses, rental vans, ferries, boats etc.

    New York City can be very overwhelming just based on the density of the city, the volume of people moving around so don't let transportation add to that stress level.

    If one is not comfortable don't use it. But people need to know it is very usable in a power chair and or wheelchair.
    I know you have a really sunny outlook on everything, but you're just straight up being deceptive when you say that "subways our used by our community fine" and say that (at least i think this is what you're saying above) 75% inaccessible doesn't mean anything.

    I mean it's a subway... inaccessible means several flights of stairs and often a barred gait that a wheelchair cannot fit through. It means we (meaning wheelchair users and those with mobility issues, which is 99.9% of this board) CANNOT use these stations. Period. It's not ambiguous. I mean I guess you could crawl down several flights of grimy NY stairs on your butt, but it wouldn't be advisable by any rational person.

    If you want to suggest to people that obstacles are easily overcome and that anything is possible and that travel in NYC is easy, go for it. Just please let's keep it factual. Misleading people into thinking they can rely on an accessible subway is setting them up to have those negative experiences you hate reading about online. If someone comes asking for advice, I think they deserve to be informed and not bombarded with inaccurate propaganda about how accessible and easy to use something is when that's just not the truth.

    If you want to wax poetic about how accessible NYC buses are, I'm all for it, pretty sure 100% of those are wheelchair accessible now and that's a great point to talk up.

  5. #45
    Oh, and that 75% inaccessible numbers is from 2018, not 20 years ago in San Francisco. Just check out an MTA map, it's easy to see.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
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    I am bemused by this thread.
    Having worked/lived there for over 30 years , commuting, moving about all parts of the city, in and out of buildings and dealing with it's inhabitants all day, many times 7 days/week.
    It was rarely anything other than one giant pain in the ass....AND THAT'S WHEN I WAS AB. I learned nearly every neighborhood by walking, driving, taxi-ing and taking most ever subway line. I became intimate with most street directions, traffic hubs, peculiar traffic patterns, and secret parking spots.
    My strong advice is to prepare to get your ass kicked. The Apple will swallow you up even without being wheel-chaired. Unless you're off hours (Sat or Sun 5 - 7 am) being in popular areas in a wheelchair you'll be pushed along amongst swarms of people while being relegated to waist-high views ahead of you (lest you have a persicope), counting Levis tags, contending with the impatient trying to get to where they're going to. You'll become a sidewalk obstacle. Yeah, most sidewalks have curb cuts, but most roads have potholes, subway grate dips, man-hole covers etc. Then there's cobble stone , sidewalk fences, sidewalks uprooted by curb trees, delivery trucks blocking sidewalks, driveways etc. I won't say all NY'ers are rude, but not everyone is so accommodating either. Subways....Good God man.
    Carry a 3ft ramp for the single step-ups you will encounter. Restaurants are tight, bathrooms tighter, sidewalk seating encroach too much.
    Bucket list..seriously?
    If you find yourself near Newark Airport, go a bit further and visit Wise Young. Nice guy, nudge him on sci research.
    My suggestions; pick exact destinations and go exactly there. It gets cold in the shadows of buildings, in the hot sun the pavement melts.

  7. #47
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    We were in NYC last October. The first two days we walked everywhere. I'm not going to lie. It was very intimidating! It's always go go go! We've been to Vegas, New Orleans and Miami and they were a walk in the park compared to NYC! The rest of the time we used taxis. It definitely was better but they drive crazy!

  8. #48
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    https://ny.curbed.com/2017/9/25/1636...e-stations-map

    Out of the MTA?s 472 subway stations, only 117? or 20 percent? are fully accessible and even then, mobility-impaired commuters have to pray that they don?t encounter broken elevators and escalators.

  9. #49
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
    We were in NYC last October. The first two days we walked everywhere. I'm not going to lie. It was very intimidating! It's always go go go! We've been to Vegas, New Orleans and Miami and they were a walk in the park compared to NYC! The rest of the time we used taxis. It definitely was better but they drive crazy!
    Hack: thanks for confirming what is real.

  10. #50
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    I was in Tokyo, Japan last September. A city of approximately 40 million people (compared to roughly 9 million in NYC). The efficiency and overall access of their subway systems shames that of NYC.

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