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Thread: New York City for the disabled traveller

  1. #1

    New York City for the disabled traveller

    It is my wife's 50th birthday in December and she is wanting to go to NYC, obviously I would like to go with her but as a high level tetra (c3,vented) travel is always daunting especially internationally. Trying to research accessibility, hotels/transport isn't easy so I would welcome any advice on hotels that are disabled friendly possibly with ceiling track hoist, ease of getting around the city, accessibility of the main tourist attractions, transfer from airport etc. We will need to bring one support worker with us so have those extra costs to consider.

  2. #2
    The only hotels in the USA that I am aware of that have ceiling track lifts are in Las Vegas. You would need to either bring your own floor-based lift, or rent one for use in NYC, which would also require either the rental of a hospital bed by you, or being guaranteed a non-platform bed by the hotel.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by mrb View Post
    It is my wife's 50th birthday in December and she is wanting to go to NYC, obviously I would like to go with her but as a high level tetra (c3,vented) travel is always daunting especially internationally. Trying to research accessibility, hotels/transport isn't easy so I would welcome any advice on hotels that are disabled friendly possibly with ceiling track hoist, ease of getting around the city, accessibility of the main tourist attractions, transfer from airport etc. We will need to bring one support worker with us so have those extra costs to consider.
    I like when others sound less excited for us to venture out...

    New York is an amazing city to travel to and is very accessible!

    Due to small size of most rooms I dont know of any hotels that have lifts so I would look at renting a hoyer lift or bring your own.

    Bring a worker would depend on if you use one at home then yes if. If not then getting ready for a day should not be any difference then home.

    Getting around the city can be very simple it depends on your level of adventure?

    Most people in the city don't drive so they use Subways, cabs, walk and bike.

    For people visiting we also can use these options with little effort.

    Its also a city you can see a lot just walking or rolling to major tourist attractions.

    I would 1st start looking at hotels that can support your lift.

    If you send me a message I can help. My Wife and travel to New York every year at end of summer.

    Airport transportation I would suggest flying to LaGuardia or Newark and you can arrange Supershuttle that can take you and your chairs and mobility aids for about $30.00

    One thing to consider it is very cold and many times crazy winter storms in New York City which means the snow gets pushed to the sides of the streets and covers the curb cuts...

    But I would still go just be prepared...

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    This may come in handy. It is a new feature on Google maps, And New York City is one of the first cities to have this feature, Transit Navigation:

    To make transit more accessible to nearly everyone, Google has wheelchair-accessible routes in Google Maps. The new feature will give those with wheelchairs or other mobility needs an easier way to navigate using public transit.

    To find the wheelchair accessible routes, type your destination into Google Maps, tap "Directions," and then choose the public transportation icon. Once you tap on "Options," you'll find wheelchair accessible under the "Routes" section. It will show you a list of all that possible routes that accommodate wheelchairs.

    The feature is currently rolling out globally in all the major metropolitan transit centers such as New York, Tokyo, London, Mexico City, Sydney, and Boston. Google plans on adding more wheelchair-accessible routes to its app in the coming months as they work with various transit agencies.
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile...ssible-routes/

    Google Maps: https://www.blog.google/products/map...it-navigation/

  5. #5
    I dont show that as an option yet in New York and I think its to knew yet to be accurate...

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollPositive View Post
    I dont show that as an option yet in New York and I think its to knew yet to be accurate...
    Yes, it is new, just announced on March 15, 2018. Google's introduction says the feature is available in New York City. If it isn't live right now, it should be in a few days and certainly will be up and kinks worked out by December, when the original poster will be visiting. This kind of feature is a very positive thing for wheelchair travelers...a good start.

    Rio Akasaka
    Product Manager, Google Maps
    Published Mar 15, 2018
    Google Maps was built to help people navigate and explore the world, providing directions, worldwide, to people traveling by car, bicycle or on foot. But in city centers, buses and trains are often the best way to get around, which presents a challenge for people who use wheelchairs or with other mobility needs. Information about which stations and routes are wheelchair friendly isn’t always readily available or easy to find. To make public transit work for everyone, today we’re introducing “wheelchair accessible” routes in transit navigation to make getting around easier for those with mobility needs.

    To access the “wheelchair accessible” routes, type your desired destination into Google Maps. Tap “Directions” then select the public transportation icon. Then tap “Options” and under the Routes section, you’ll find “wheelchair accessible” as a new route type. When you select this option, Google Maps will show you a list of possible routes that take mobility needs into consideration. Starting today, this feature is rolling out in major metropolitan transit centers around the world, starting with London, New York, Tokyo, Mexico City, Boston, and Sydney. We're looking forward to working with additional transit agencies in the coming months to bring more wheelchair accessible routes to Google Maps.

    In addition to making public transportation more accessible, people around the world have been helping us
    add accessibility information to Google Maps. Last September, Local Guides from around the world gathered at 200 global meet-ups to answer accessibility questions—like whether a place has a step-free entrance or an accessible restroom—for more than 12 million places. Additionally, we’ve been busy capturing and updating Street View imagery of transit stations and city centers so people can preview a place or transit station ahead of time.

    We built this feature to make life easier for people who use wheelchairs, but accessible routes are also helpful if you’re on crutches or pushing a stroller. With the help of transit agencies around the globe and people like you who
    contribute local knowledge, we’re making progress toward a more accessible world for everyone.
    Last edited by gjnl; 03-16-2018 at 01:56 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Yes, it is new, just announced on March 15, 2018. Google's introduction says the feature is available in New York City. If it isn't live right now, it should be in a few days and certainly will be up and kinks worked out by December, when the original poster will be visiting. This kind of feature is a very positive thing for wheelchair travelers...a good start.

    Rio Akasaka
    Product Manager, Google Maps
    Published Mar 15, 2018
    Google Maps was built to help people navigate and explore the world, providing directions, worldwide, to people traveling by car, bicycle or on foot. But in city centers, buses and trains are often the best way to get around, which presents a challenge for people who use wheelchairs or with other mobility needs. Information about which stations and routes are wheelchair friendly isn’t always readily available or easy to find. To make public transit work for everyone, today we’re introducing “wheelchair accessible” routes in transit navigation to make getting around easier for those with mobility needs.

    To access the “wheelchair accessible” routes, type your desired destination into Google Maps. Tap “Directions” then select the public transportation icon. Then tap “Options” and under the Routes section, you’ll find “wheelchair accessible” as a new route type. When you select this option, Google Maps will show you a list of possible routes that take mobility needs into consideration. Starting today, this feature is rolling out in major metropolitan transit centers around the world, starting with London, New York, Tokyo, Mexico City, Boston, and Sydney. We're looking forward to working with additional transit agencies in the coming months to bring more wheelchair accessible routes to Google Maps.

    In addition to making public transportation more accessible, people around the world have been helping us
    add accessibility information to Google Maps. Last September, Local Guides from around the world gathered at 200 global meet-ups to answer accessibility questions—like whether a place has a step-free entrance or an accessible restroom—for more than 12 million places. Additionally, we’ve been busy capturing and updating Street View imagery of transit stations and city centers so people can preview a place or transit station ahead of time.

    We built this feature to make life easier for people who use wheelchairs, but accessible routes are also helpful if you’re on crutches or pushing a stroller. With the help of transit agencies around the globe and people like you who
    contribute local knowledge, we’re making progress toward a more accessible world for everyone.


    Sorry I dont agree...because the information needs aggregate in to the app and you dont know where its coming from.

    Buses, subways, trains and cabs are available now and be used by our community fine.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    863
    We used Curb in NYC. It worked pretty good. Make sure they know you need a handicap accessible van.

  9. #9
    Thanks for the info so far, from the research I had done on subway and getting around it seemed to be not so good for getting around but maybe I leave my power chair at home and get pushed around. It'll be lower height so easier for cabs but I can't imagine as easy as a London cab. Travelling with hoist I am used to doing but usually in my own van, with spare vents, suction machine etc it is a lot to carry. I usually have 2 support workers really should have more as 1 is needed for a waking nightshift just in case of vent problems but my wife is right next to me and repositions me early hours and then acts as second support worker to get me up.

  10. #10
    I lived in NYC in late 60's, early 70's before it became accessible - hopefully due to an activist group I belonged to. Just a comment that some folks have previously posted about visits to NYC, that one might find accommodations outside the city, then rapid transit to city itself. Last time we visited, around Spring 2002, we stayed in New Jersey and drove into the city in our van twice. It was mainly driving all over Manhattan as parking was impossible, but on the last day we found a little side street that had a spot, and it was right near a small memorial for the World Trade Center victims, so we were able to visit that in our chairs. We did have fun driving around and seeing places we were familiar with over 25 years previous.

    So many folks outside of NYC commute from towns outside the city. Even if you were a half hour outside NYC there would be trains that go into the city.

    Hope you can pull this off! Maybe your wife would consider a Fall trip instead of December?

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