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Thread: calories burned??

  1. #1

    calories burned??

    what is a rough avg of cals burned for just regular digestion etc without factoring in exercise and activity for sci ppl??
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  2. #2
    I've read that the process of digestion, by itself, burns roughly 10% of the total daily calories - that figure is subject to modification by the type of food that's consumed, as digesting fat burns the least number of calories, and protein the most.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  3. #3
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    This is an excerpt from a Livestrong article: https://www.livestrong.com/article/5...hermic-effect/

    The thermic effect of food refers to the amount of energy used by your body to digest, absorb and dispose of the food you ingest. Consider this the operating cost of working your digestive system; one of the few costs in life you may be happy to pay. You burn off some of the calories you consume in order to digest and eliminate the food.

    The overall thermic effect of food is estimated to be, on average, about 10 percent of your overall calories, according to WorldFitnessNetwork.com. If you consume 2,000 calories over the course of the day, about 10 percent, or about 200 calories, will be expended on digesting, absorbing, metabolizing and eliminating that food.

    Different types of food require different amounts of energy to process, according to WorldFitnessNetwork.com. Fats have a thermic effect of about 3 percent. If you consume 100 fat calories, only 3 calories will be spent digesting the fat. Fibrous vegetables and fruit have a thermic effect of about 20 percent, while proteins have a thermic effect of about 30 percent. If you eat 300 protein calories, you’ll burn off 90 calories digesting the protein.

    The number of calories you expend in digestion depends on your body composition. Those with greater muscle mass burn off more calories digesting food than those who have more fat, according to ShapeSense.com.

    Following this article is a discussion of Highly Thermogenic Foods and a list of foods that burn calories to digest.

  4. #4
    thx all.
    so what does a quad/para burn on rough avg, cal wise, in just daily life not factoring in activity.
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  5. #5
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    QUOTE=fuentejps;1847258]thx all.
    so what does a quad/para burn on rough avg, cal wise, in just daily life not factoring in activity.[/QUOTE]

    This goes back to basal metabolic rate (BMR) that we have discussed in other threads. Basal Metabolic Rate is the calories you would burn if you stayed in bed all day. Of course the BMR is affected by muscle mass, but it is doubtful it makes a great deal of difference.

    BMR Calculator:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/tools/bmr-calculator

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    QUOTE=fuentejps;1847258]thx all.
    so what does a quad/para burn on rough avg, cal wise, in just daily life not factoring in activity.
    This goes back to basal metabolic rate (BMR) that we have discussed in other threads. Basal Metabolic Rate is the calories you would burn if you stayed in bed all day. Of course the BMR is affected by muscle mass, but it is doubtful it makes a great deal of difference.

    BMR Calculator:
    http://www.myfitnesspal.com/tools/bmr-calculator[/QUOTE]
    I found that on avg
    male 2200 sedentary
    woman 1800 sedentary
    I would think it would be much lower in sci??
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  7. #7
    http://sci.washington.edu/info/forum...ition_2011.asp has useful info but I found over estimates the number of calories a high level tetraplegic can eat, 1500 keeps me at the same weight, 1200 and I slowly lose weight.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    I found that on avg
    male 2200 sedentary
    woman 1800 sedentary
    I would think it would be much lower in sci??
    It might be lower, due to differences in muscle mass between SCI and non-SCI people - but other factors might enter in, like spasticity (which is akin to isometric exercise, and can be pretty constant - even at rest).
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  9. #9
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    I've searched the internet for scholarly articles on this subject. There are really quite a few, although the population sample in each study is very small. This article really gets into the weeds of this subject. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, "Difference in resting metabolic rate between paraplegic and able-bodied subjects are explained by differences in body composition." http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/2/371.full

    In addition to body composition and muscle mass, age seems to play a role as well. Take NL. I ran her numbers through a basal metabolic rate (BMR) calculator. At her current age her estimated BMR is 1.013 calories per day. At half her age, with all other factors, weight and height the same, her BMR is 1,183 calories per day. Does this indicate that metabolism slows as we age, assume that we become less active as we age, a bit of both, hormonal changes, etc.?

  10. #10
    GREAT POINT
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    It might be lower, due to differences in muscle mass between SCI and non-SCI people - but other factors might enter in, like spasticity (which is akin to isometric exercise, and can be pretty constant - even at rest).
    THX GJ. i'll read this.
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    I've searched the internet for scholarly articles on this subject. There are really quite a few, although the population sample in each study is very small. This article really gets into the weeds of this subject. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, "Difference in resting metabolic rate between paraplegic and able-bodied subjects are explained by differences in body composition." http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/2/371.full

    In addition to body composition and muscle mass, age seems to play a role as well. Take NL. I ran her numbers through a basal metabolic rate (BMR) calculator. At her current age her estimated BMR is 1.013 calories per day. At half her age, with all other factors, weight and height the same, her BMR is 1,183 calories per day. Does this indicate that metabolism slows as we age, assume that we become less active as we age, a bit of both, hormonal changes, etc.?
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

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