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Thread: legs laying on downtubes in chair

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    What works for me is as simple as tucking a pillow under the outside of my hip when lying on my back. Once I correct the hip rotation my leg lies straight. Deeper tuck on the pillow creates more internal rotation, but there is a point where too much tuck defeats the purpose. I dunno if this is clinically sound but seems to have been working well on my right leg for ~10 years.
    Yes, this is what is called a "trochanter roll" and it works well as long as you don't have to much pressure from the roll along right over the trochanter or side of the knee. This picture shows it too high (along side the trochanter). Keep it between the trochanter and the knee. Also, rolling it "under" like this (with a towel or blanket) helps it stay in place better:



    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  2. #22
    Wouldn't John be able to accomplish the same thing by positioning his feet consistent with the illustration while in his stander? And how much of an effect is this really going to have? Seems like it would be very subtle at best.


    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Yes, this is what is called a "trochanter roll" and it works well as long as you don't have to much pressure from the roll along right over the trochanter or side of the knee. This picture shows it too high (along side the trochanter). Keep it between the trochanter and the knee. Also, rolling it "under" like this (with a towel or blanket) helps it stay in place better:



    (KLD)

  3. #23
    The effect of laying with both legs externally rotated all night is not going to be overcome by standing with them in the neutral position for 1-2 hours in a stander. I have seen the use of trochanter rolls or other devices in bed to prevent external rotation very successful in preventing external rotation contractures.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Wouldn't John be able to accomplish the same thing by positioning his feet consistent with the illustration while in his stander? And how much of an effect is this really going to have? Seems like it would be very subtle at best.
    For my anatomy the effect is profound. Without using a trochanter roll (I just use a small firm throw pillow), when lying in bed, my right leg rotates so far my foot is flat on the bed. With the roll my foot is straight up and down, rotated in if I want a stretch. My left leg has enough motor sparring to not have any hip/leg rotation issues.
    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    For my anatomy the effect is profound. Without using a trochanter roll (I just use a small firm throw pillow), when lying in bed, my right leg rotates so far my foot is flat on the bed. With the roll my foot is straight up and down, rotated in if I want a stretch. My left leg has enough motor sparring to not have any hip/leg rotation issues.
    Interesting. So do you sleep in this position? And if you do, for how long, because that's time not spent off your butt.

  6. #26
    You don't get a lot of ischial pressure laying on your back as long as the head of the bed is flat, but you do get sacral, coccyx, heel, and shoulder blade pressure. While it is not recommended to remain in one position all night long, even with a pressure reducing mattress, many people do this.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Interesting. So do you sleep in this position? And if you do, for how long, because that's time not spent off your butt.
    I probably spend a couple hours a night on my back, but also a couple on both sides. Can?t sleep on my stomach. Another hour or 2 a day on my back, reading or doing homeschooling work, is pretty normal also.
    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  8. #28
    Senior Member Domosoyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Here is an example (Sage Prevalon boots, used with the wedges that keep the foot in neutral position):
    Something I always wondered about these boots. Do people get hot with these on all night? They look crazy big so I assume you don't try to put them under any blankets. I bought some of these for my daughter with the wedge awhile ago but when I put them she laughed and asked if I was serious. Now I'm thinking we should re-visit these.....

  9. #29
    when standing my feet/legs are neutral like in pic, I don't feel any hip stretch though.
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Wouldn't John be able to accomplish the same thing by positioning his feet consistent with the illustration while in his stander? And how much of an effect is this really going to have? Seems like it would be very subtle at best.
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  10. #30
    stretch example? I looked on youtube but what I found looked a bit crazy.
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