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Thread: Adjustable bed frame, or not

  1. #1
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Adjustable bed frame, or not

    Just curious as to how many quads use adjustable bed frames vs. standard frames. I have an adjustable, and like it for the ability to drink (water!) in bed, have a snack, watch TV, etc. I also sleep with my head slightly raised. I have trouble sleeping/drinking in hotel beds.

  2. #2
    Keep in mind that an "adjustable" bed frame is not the same as a hospital bed frame.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
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    The head of my bed goes up and down if that's what you mean. It's good for eating, drinking, and catheterizing myself while in bed. I believe it is made by Legget and Platt.

  4. #4
    Use Total Electric Hospital beds since early 90's. Having full bed height electric is easier on transfers with chairs that has no elevator.
    My wife decided against last replacement and got her a electric adjustable bed. Does not have any height adjustable ability.
    Had get wheels taken off my hospital bed to get height same, even with my bed completely lowered to minimum height it will go is barely down to height of her adjustable bed.
    Be real careful on mattress with adjustable bed, too. I can't move on hers, mine is plain hospital mattress now which easier to slide plus have trapeze to assist.
    Course my hospital bed is longer, too.
    Mine has solid base for mattress so when had alternating air mattress and ROHO Mattress I feel it worked better than my wife's style bed would work.
    "Good Luck!"

  5. #5
    I agree with above. Having a high/low feature on your adjustable or hospital bed frame can make transfers easier, and is much easier and safer for caregivers providing you assistance. There are a few high/low adjustable beds on the market, but most are going to be hospital bed type frames.

    Keep in mind when shopping for an adjustable (non-hospital) bed frame that you may at sometime need to use a floor-based mobile lift, even if you do not need it now, and many adjustable beds will not accommodate these due to lack of clearance under the bed.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    Our Sleep Number adjustable beds came with glides. We replaced the glides with casters to achieve the same height...mattress/wheelchair cushion and make the beds easier to move. You can get casters in various diameters that raise the bed to your preferred heights.

    Leggett-Platt the maker of the adjustable bases for Sleep Number beds (and many other adjustable bed brands) makes leg/caster extensions that can raise the bed frame off of the floor in the 9-12 inch range, depending on the extension height and caster diameter selected. You can use the extensions with glides or casters. I think the extensions come in 3", 4", 5" 7", and 9".

    NL will have cataract surgery toward the end of summer and we will need to use a lift for a time. We found leg extensions and casters that will raise the bottom of the frame off of the floor 9 inches, which will accommodate rolling a lift under the bed. Once she is cleared for lifting and bending, we will remove these extensions and go back to the preferred height we have now that puts the mattress and wheelchair cushion at the same height.
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    Last edited by gjnl; 06-07-2018 at 10:52 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    I sleep on a Twin XL Sleep Number bed, on an old Temperpedic adjustable frame. I’d like to upgrade to a Queen, but have concerns with my attendants being able to easily roll, dress, etc. me. A Full is not an option, as they are not long enough for me. It appears there is no cost savings buying a L&G adjustable frame independently vs. buying it through Sleep Number.

    Also curious, for those with the functionality, how many sleep with their heads raised?

  8. #8
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    I sleep on a Twin XL Sleep Number bed, on an old Temperpedic adjustable frame. I?d like to upgrade to a Queen, but have concerns with my attendants being able to easily roll, dress, etc. me. A Full is not an option, as they are not long enough for me. It appears there is no cost savings buying a L&G adjustable frame independently vs. buying it through Sleep Number.

    Also curious, for those with the functionality, how many sleep with their heads raised?

  9. #9
    Avoid sleeping on your back with the HOB (head of bed) elevated above 30 degrees, as this can put your sacrum and heels at significant risk of shear injury and skin breakdown.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #10
    I'm a 74 yo T-10 para, 48 years post injury. I switched to a Transfermaster bed years ago to save my shoulders. At low position the bed is about 18 or 19" high at top of mattress, it elevates well above my seat cushion for transfers out of bed. As Sci nurse mentioned this bed would not work with a lift unless raised up on blocks as the frame is right on floor. At various times due to injuries and medical issues, the ability to elevate my feet or head have been helpful. In addition to my 6 way power seats in our vans this bed is a major asset in preserving my shoulders. I use a transfer board in and out of bed and a transfer board from van seat back to chair. Right now I have no pain at all in either shoulder (knock wood) I think that's attributable to taking these precautions.

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