Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Bladder Stone?

  1. #11
    Senior Member CapnGimp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Newport,TN USA male T4complete
    Posts
    3,446
    Blog Entries
    1

    my history pics included

    KLD posted this in 2004...
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...atients-(2003)

    I have had stones removed a few times starting in 1999, the last was 2016 when I started using Duette dual balloon catheters to reduce clogging/blockage. I will post a picture that was taken in 2014 when I had a couple of big ones removed(described as tennis ball size added together), didn't get pics of any of the others. The 2016 trip was done with lasers and if I can find the paperwork sometime, I will get the size. For some reason, they always put me under in the hospital. I can't feel a thing and do not get AD, since one time in rehab. I have 'grit' built up on the end of my catheters every time I remove them. I change them about 2-3 times per month. Hydration makes a big difference in discharge rates of sediments, 'slime', etc. The closer to clear I keep my urine in the leg bag, the less often they show up. For the record, I do not eat any animal products and avoid sugars like the plague, unless it occurs naturally in the fruits I eat. When I was eating animal products and sugars, it was WAY worse, that is when I produced the 'tennis ball' sized ones.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    My doctor prescribed Potassium citrate to help prevent kidney stones.
    There is no evidence that this medication (Urocit-K) decreases stone development in people with SCI. It is primarily used for AB people who have a genetic predisposition to be "stone formers". It also only helps with calcium stones, not the struvite stones that commonly form in people with SCI.

    Some urologists prescribe acetohydroxamic acid (Lithostat) for struvite stones that cannot be surgical removed.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #13
    Just thought I'd share my experience 30 years as c 5-6. Had bladder stones removed twice. First was 10-12 years ago and "crushed and flushed" via claw on cysto. No anesthetic needed. Unless they used topical - I don't know. Annual cystoscope I undergo never bothers me.

    This past summer, had it done again - but now they use a fancy-shmacy laser. Thankfully my anesthetist was amazing and she had the forethought to prepare for immediate intervention if needed. It was needed. They no sooner began inserting and my bp shot up dangerously high. Moral of he story - If they use a laser - You need Anesthetic.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    There is no evidence that this medication (Urocit-K) decreases stone development in people with SCI. It is primarily used for AB people who have a genetic predisposition to be "stone formers". It also only helps with calcium stones, not the struvite stones that commonly form in people with SCI.

    Some urologists prescribe acetohydroxamic acid (Lithostat) for struvite stones that cannot be surgical removed.

    (KLD)
    That's interesting. How about uric acid stones? That's what I had removed surgically. Maybe now that I am Stone Free I can do whatever I please. I can ride the breeze.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    That's interesting. How about uric acid stones? That's what I had removed surgically. Maybe now that I am Stone Free I can do whatever I please. I can ride the breeze.
    Stones can easily reoccur, in fact once you have had stones, it is very likely that you will have them again. Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate and lots of fluids (at least 3 liters of water daily) are recommended for prevention of uric acid stones as well as calcium stones. Uric acid stones form less readily in alkaline urine.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #16
    Sodium bicarbonate costs pennies. Potasium citrate costs hundreds of dollars so there must be some benefit?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Stones can easily reoccur, in fact once you have had stones, it is very likely that you will have them again. Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate and lots of fluids (at least 3 liters of water daily) are recommended for prevention of uric acid stones as well as calcium stones. Uric acid stones form less readily in alkaline urine.

    (KLD)
    Three liters of water a day can put some of us as risk for hyponatremia. Any one planning on embarking on the above recommendation needs to monitor their electrolyte balance with frequent blood tests. That said, the counsel of a nephrologist, in this instance, is a reasonable consideration.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by CapnGimp View Post
    KLD posted this in 2004...
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...atients-(2003)

    I have had stones removed a few times starting in 1999, the last was 2016 when I started using Duette dual balloon catheters to reduce clogging/blockage. I will post a picture that was taken in 2014 when I had a couple of big ones removed(described as tennis ball size added together), didn't get pics of any of the others. The 2016 trip was done with lasers and if I can find the paperwork sometime, I will get the size. For some reason, they always put me under in the hospital. I can't feel a thing and do not get AD, since one time in rehab. I have 'grit' built up on the end of my catheters every time I remove them. I change them about 2-3 times per month. Hydration makes a big difference in discharge rates of sediments, 'slime', etc. The closer to clear I keep my urine in the leg bag, the less often they show up. For the record, I do not eat any animal products and avoid sugars like the plague, unless it occurs naturally in the fruits I eat. When I was eating animal products and sugars, it was WAY worse, that is when I produced the 'tennis ball' sized ones.
    Side question... I read that your last stone was after using the Duette catheter. Like I first stated, I've never had a stone until now. I know it's most likely from just being a person with sci using a catheter. ...but I just started using a Duette catheter about 6 months ago. Do you think it contributed to yours?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate and lots of fluids (at least 3 liters of water daily) are recommended for prevention of uric acid stones as well as calcium stones. (KLD)
    Potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate -Are these tablets? Or powder? Do you mix it in water? Any suggested dosage?

  10. #20
    Sodium bicarb is also known as alka seltzer, here in the states. It needs to be dissolved and then down the hatch. Cheap and does seem to work for some people.

    Once you have had a stone, you are more likely to form them again. A indwelling catheter of any sorts seems to put you at higher risk for forming them. However, I know plenty of people who have had them and have not had an indwelling.

    Diet has gone back and forth as a culprit, and there is some evidence that sugars in particular can contribute towards the formation. I am not convinced 100% since I know people on both sides (those who consume a lot and those who don't), both who form and don't form stones. It certainly does not hurt to limit your sugar intake.

    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

Similar Threads

  1. Bladder stone
    By javier678 in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-16-2012, 06:20 PM
  2. Bladder Stone
    By RJP in forum Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-08-2010, 05:42 PM
  3. Bladder Stone
    By Mombo in forum Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-19-2009, 07:48 PM
  4. Bladder Stone
    By BeeBee in forum Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-29-2005, 10:27 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-09-2004, 02:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •