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Thread: Catheter Care

  1. #1

    Catheter Care

    Just curious...

    When I switch between leg and bed bags or irrigate my bladder, I cleanse the inside of the bag and it's inside wall tubing with pure bleach using a 50 cc catheter tip syringe to inject it...then dip and swish the outside of the bag's tube area in a cup of pure bleach...then rinse the outer tube area with running tap water (to prevent ruining my clothes)...and then, spray to the point of soaking the outer tube and the hole area that hooks up to my catheter with extra strength MicrocynAH.

    For those of you that wear an internal catheter, what methods do you follow when trading bags, irrigating, etc?

    I do pretty well in regards to getting uti's that need treating, but I still get them. So, I'm always looking for ways to better my care regimen. Any suggestions on rinsing the bleach with something other than tap water? I'm considering using sterile water or sterile saline just to improve on being even more cleaner.

    Take care,
    Karen

  2. #2
    While it is best to maintain a closed system (ie, never break the seal between an indwelling catheter and the drainage bag), many people do so. Our preference is to attach a new leg bag using extension tubing to the catheter when it is changed, then attach, at bedtime, and bedside drainage unit to the drain port of the leg bag. The leg bag is never remove from the catheter, just taken off the leg when in bed. The bedside drainage bag is therefore the only bag that gets cleaned.

    The following procedure is what is recommended, based on research, for cleaning urinary drainage bags:


    1. Drain all urine from the bag.
    2. Fill bag 1/3-1/2 full with tap water (this is easier if you attach a funnel with some latex tubing to the fill port).
    3. Shake the bag vigorously for 10 seconds.
    4. Drain the water into the toilet.
    5. Fill the bag again 1/3-1/2 full of tap water and repeat the shaking for 10 seconds.
    6. Drain the water into the toilet.
    7. Mix a 10% bleach solution (it should be fresh made each time). This would mean something like 40ml. of bleach and add tap water to make 400ml. (we use a urinal to do this).
    8. Fill the bag with the bleach solution.
    9. Shake the bag vigorously for 30 seconds.
    10. Drain the bleach solution into the toilet.
    11. Wrap the entire bag in a clean dry towel and store securely until it is next needed.


    Soaking for long periods is no more effective than above, and 100% bleach solution is not needed.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    While it is best to maintain a closed system (ie, never break the seal between an indwelling catheter and the drainage bag), many people do so. Our preference is to attach a new leg bag using extension tubing to the catheter when it is changed, then attach, at bedtime, and bedside drainage unit to the drain port of the leg bag. The leg bag is never remove from the catheter, just taken off the leg when in bed. The bedside drainage bag is therefore the only bag that gets cleaned.

    The following procedure is what is recommended, based on research, for cleaning urinary drainage bags:


    1. Drain all urine from the bag.
    2. Fill bag 1/3-1/2 full with tap water (this is easier if you attach a funnel with some latex tubing to the fill port).
    3. Shake the bag vigorously for 10 seconds.
    4. Drain the water into the toilet.
    5. Fill the bag again 1/3-1/2 full of tap water and repeat the shaking for 10 seconds.
    6. Drain the water into the toilet.
    7. Mix a 10% bleach solution (it should be fresh made each time). This would mean something like 40ml. of bleach and add tap water to make 400ml. (we use a urinal to do this).
    8. Fill the bag with the bleach solution.
    9. Shake the bag vigorously for 30 seconds.
    10. Drain the bleach solution into the toilet.
    11. Wrap the entire bag in a clean dry towel and store securely until it is next needed.


    Soaking for long periods is no more effective than above, and 100% bleach solution is not needed.

    (KLD)
    I would like to try following this hook up method. I use a Hollister leg bag and a Bard bed bag. Are there certain brands that attach to each other or is there some kind of attachment that I can get to connect them?

    Also, I irrigate my bladder. Do you know of any way to do this I thought detaching the bag?

  4. #4
    Why do you irrigate your bladder? Generally routine irrigation is not recommended.

    Using a Hollister leg bag, do you get the kits that include fabric straps and an extension tubing? If so, when setting up a new bag, cut off 2-3" of the extension tubing on the non-connector end before attaching to the bag. Put this on the drain port of the leg bag. At night, connect the bed bag to that piece of extension tubing and open the leg bag drain port. Here is a diagram:

    (KLD)
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    I irrigate with the Microcyn formula to help combat utis. Also, I randomly pass settlement and need to keep washed out sometimes.

    Also, I like the ideal of this layout. It seems so much more safefer.

  6. #6
    Microcyn should be used as an instillation, not an irrigation, but either way, with this set up you do have to break the seal to administer the instillation or to irrigate.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #7
    Thank you for the help KLD.

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