Page 4 of 19 FirstFirst 1234567891011121314 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 184

Thread: Why Don't We Have a Cure for Spinal Cord Injury? 2016

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    Jim, do you plan on participating in the US trial since you're so bullish about it? When do we get to see you stepping for hours in a walker?
    I'm incomplete, not eligible. If I had the money, I would do it when compassionate use becomes available.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I'm incomplete, not eligible. If I had the money, I would do it when compassionate use becomes available.
    The CareCure membership could always contribute to your participation as a reward for your hard work in delivering this therapy to the Community. What say you?

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    The CareCure membership could always contribute to your participation as a reward for your hard work in delivering this therapy to the Community. What say you?
    I take no credit for delivering this therapy.

    If the community were to raise the funds, I would pass it on to someone with a complete injury. I am already fortunate enough to be able to live independently.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Paolo,

    This ChinaSCINet Phase II Safety Study turned chronic completes into incompletes. These subjects were injured from 2-17 years. Fifteen out of twenty minimally regained the ability to step for hours with upper body supported walkers, some progressed further. Over half regained bowel and bladder function.

    Did you not look at the SCIM Scores?

    Do you expect researchers to deliver a cure with nothing in between?

    This trial changed lives.

    You keep stating it shouldn't go forward, why?
    Jim,

    as I said I mostly agree with your post #19, except for what I said in my post #20. China SCI Net is just one more big castle of cards. UCB cells do nothing to cure SCI, but if you torture the data long enough they will confess you know what I mean, so let's stop wasting research money on UCB cells on both basic and clinical research!

    Now I would love if we could focus on what we agree and if we can find a way let's work on it..

    Paolo

    P.S. maybe Wise can free himself from what keeps him linked to UCB cells and seriously focus on finding a cure in the future..
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  5. #35
    The complete quads now living independently would strongly disagree with you. You simply don't know what you are talking about.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The complete quads now living independently would strongly disagree with you. You simply don't know what you are talking about.
    Where is the scientific evidence of what you are saying?

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  7. #37
    Do you know what a SCIM Score is?

  8. #38
    Science News
    from research organizations


    Cells driving gecko's ability to re-grow its tail identified

    Discovery of which cells are behind the gecko's ability to re-grow its tail has implications for spinal cord treatment in humans

    Date:November 2, 2017Source:University of GuelphSummary:A researcher has discovered the spinal cord of the gecko's tail houses a special type of stem cell known as the radial glia. When the tail detaches, these cells jump into action by proliferating and making different proteins in response to the injury. The result is a brand new spinal cord. This finding has implications for developing a way to treat humans with spinal cord injuries. Share:

    FULL STORY


    This is a Leopard gecko.
    Credit: Vickaryous Lab


    This is a Leopard gecko.
    Credit: Vickaryous Lab
    Close







    A U of G researcher is the first to discover the type of stem cell that is behind the gecko's ability to re-grow its tail, a finding that has implications for spinal cord treatment in humans.
    advertisement


    Many lizards can detach a portion of their tail to avoid a predator and then regenerate a new one. Unlike mammals, the lizard tail includes a spinal cord.
    Prof. Matthew Vickaryous found that the spinal cord of the tail contained a large number of stem cells and proteins known to support stem cell growth.
    "We knew the gecko's spinal cord could regenerate, but we didn't know which cells were playing a key role," said Vickaryous, lead author of the study recently published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology. "Humans are notoriously bad at dealing with spinal cord injuries so I'm hoping we can use what we learn from geckos to coax human spinal cord injuries into repairing themselves."
    Geckos are able to re-grow a new tail within 30 days -- faster than any other type of lizard.
    In the wild, they detach their tails when grabbed by a predator. The severed tail continues to wiggle, distracting the predator long enough for the reptile to escape.
    In the lab, Vickaryous simulates this by pinching the gecko's tail causing the tail to drop. Once detached, the site of the tail loss begins to repair itself, eventually leading to new tissue formation and a new spinal cord. For this study, the biomedical sciences professor, along with PhD student Emily Gilbert, investigated what happens at the cellular level before and after detachment.
    They discovered that the spinal cord houses a special type of stem cell known as the radial glia. These stem cells are normally fairly quiet.
    "But when the tail comes off everything temporarily changes," he said. "The cells make different proteins and begin proliferating more in response to the injury. Ultimately, they make a brand new spinal cord. Once the injury is healed and the spinal cord is restored, the cells return to a resting state."
    Humans, on the other hand, respond to a spinal cord injury by making scar tissue rather than new tissue, he added. The scar tissue seals the wound quickly, but sealing the injury prevents regeneration.
    "It's a quick fix but in the long term it's a problem."
    "This may play a role in why we have a limited ability to repair our spinal cords. We are missing the key cells types required."
    This study is part of a series of investigations into the regenerative abilities of the gecko's central nervous system. The next step is to examine how the gecko is able to make new brain cells, said Vickaryous.
    "Geckos are able to regenerate many tissues throughout their bodies, making them ideal models for studying wound healing and tissue re-development. We can learn a lot from them

  9. #39
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,254
    Blog Entries
    1
    In about 100 years

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    853
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The complete quads now living independently would strongly disagree with you. You simply don't know what you are talking about.
    Thats what I'm talking about! Im not greedy, I just want to be independent! Y'all keep on keeping on SCINet! Good luck

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-21-2016, 08:15 PM
  2. Let's cure spinal cord injury now
    By manouli in forum Cure
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-09-2012, 06:43 AM
  3. There is No Cure for Spinal Cord Injury
    By Julie250 in forum Life
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-16-2010, 04:54 PM
  4. A cure for spinal cord injury?
    By manouli in forum Cure
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-31-2005, 04:55 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-18-2002, 06:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •