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Thread: Calories and weight loss.

  1. #21
    Metabolism and frame size are key to what you should weigh and how much you can eat. I'm 6'4" with a light frame (small boned - 6 inches or less wrist circumference), weigh 140 lbs, and eat just a out anything I want to maintain that weight, sometimes resorting to Ensure or Boost. I'm not a big sugar/dessert eater, aside from an occasional bowl of ice cream or a piece of dark chocolate.

    But I've always had a high metabolism, even though I am hypothyroid, taking Levothyroxine, and am about mid range in thyroid blood test while medicated. I'd suggest everyone get a thyroid blood test once a year as part of an annual physical.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by McLaren87 View Post
    You think so ? I thought 1lb a week was the gold standard target to hit.
    I wouldn't necessarily consider that sustainable, and it's partly why lots of people yo-yo, not including set point theory, genetics, and other reasons our body wants to remain at a certain rate. 1 pound = 3500 kcals. You'd have to cut your caloric intake by 500 kcal per day to lose that pound over a week. Cutting by 100-200 will take longer, but it won't be as noticeable, and is thus more sustainable.


    Quote Originally Posted by McLaren87 View Post
    Whats up man, you were on the other forum. We got to talking about computers and you showed me your shoebox haha. I'm on my built PC now.

    Whats your weight, height and injury level ? So I'm probably not losing weight at 1650 then.
    Nice! I sold that desktop last year and moved to a single machine. I'm T12/L1 but my height/weight is all weird because I'm an amputee; that's where the equations estimate but often fail. Get your RMR tested if you really want to know.

    If you're activity level is little to none I would bump it down to 1400 and see what happens over the course of a month.

  3. #23
    I love how people try to develop a science of out of something that is inherently flawed from the start. The inherent problem with counting calories is that it requires will power, which is what the dieter does not have. This is setting yourself up for failure. Even if you are the exceptional dieter (with plenty of will power) stopping eating while you're still hungry takes the fun right out of one of the top two pleasures in life. Don't do that to yourself. Just determine what you can't eat. Then enjoy eating as much as you want of what you can eat. It works and you don't need to fuss nor deny yourself the pleasure of eating.
    Last edited by August West; 10-17-2017 at 07:59 PM.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    I love how people try to develop a science of out of something that is inherently flawed from the start. The inherent problem with counting calories is that it requires will power, which is what the dieter does not have. This is setting yourself up for failure. Even if you are the exceptional dieter (with plenty of will power) stopping eating while you're still hungry takes the fun right out of one of the top two pleasures in life. Don't do that to yourself. Just determine what you can't eat. Then enjoy eating as much as you want of what you can eat. It works and you don't need to fuss nor deny yourself the pleasure of eating.
    On the other hand, you will feel deprived if you don't allow yourself a bit of the things you absolutely love. In those cases, plan your indulgences to treat yourself, and then only give yourself half of what you would normally eat. If you would eat a cup of chocolate chip ice cream, eat that ice cream when you must, but only eat a half cup and serve that half cup to yourself in a small bowl.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    I love how people try to develop a science of out of something that is inherently flawed from the start. The inherent problem with counting calories is that it requires will power, which is what the dieter does not have. This is setting yourself up for failure. Even if you are the exceptional dieter (with plenty of will power) stopping eating while you're still hungry takes the fun right out of one of the top two pleasures in life. Don't do that to yourself. Just determine what you can't eat. Then enjoy eating as much as you want of what you can eat. It works and you don't need to fuss nor deny yourself the pleasure of eating.
    Well yea, that's why most diets don't work. It's looked at as a temporary thing until they get their weight in check and then they can go back to eating like they did before. In order for it to be successful, it needs to be a lifestyle change. But your statement "Just determine what you can't eat" is contradictory to your stance because that's part of the problem too. Rather than practice moderation, or portion control, people deem foods "bad" and try and will themselves to never eat them, which ends up failing too.

    In the short term, counting calories and aiming for 200 lower than your EER isn't crazy. You can do that with your current foods without noticing a difference in hunger, and you can do it at the same time as you're transitioning to a healthier lifestyle.

    Nutrition is still a young science, but that's why I loved studying it. At the end of the day though, there's so much crap and pseudoscience out there. Eat as clean and unprocessed as possible, control your caloric intake, and exercise. Pretty simple, honestly.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by paraparajumper View Post
    But your statement "Just determine what you can't eat" is contradictory to your stance because that's part of the problem too.
    There is some truth to what you say. But it's minor stuff compared to going hungry. For example, I avoid wheat so I order corn tortillas rather than flour tortillas. It still requires some will power but not like going hungry.

  7. #27
    I know what you're thinking. Substituting corn tortillas for flour tortillas in a Mexican restaurant is one thing, but denying yourself a sandwich is another. Surely, you're setting yourself up for failure if you can't eat a sandwich or if you have to eat it on that awefull gluten free bread. Not really, even though I avoid wheat, I can tolerate fresh sour dough bread. No harm, no foul on passing over refined breads. Have you ever asked yourself what kind of bread works best for me? That's the kind of homework that pays off. Denying yourself the second half of the sandwich is just downright depressing.

  8. #28
    Ok, you got me going. Last one and I'm out for now. I leave you with my takeaway. Experiment with what you can eat rather than how much you can eat and you may no longer have to worry about quantity. Reset your body and start fresh with a pen and paper handy. Start with just meal replacement shakes for breakfast and lunch and lean protein with steamed veggies for dinner. After a week of this start reducing the shakes and adding more foods one at a time. You'll be amazed as to what you will learn about your body. Once you get into the habit it will become second nature to learn about food interacting with your body. I found that certain foods that disagree with me are no problem when combined with other foods. For example, nuts slow my digestion down to the point where I can't move. Keep that up and I'll put on weight not because of the calories but because they back me up. But I don't have a problem digesting nuts when combined with bananas and/or yogurt. That combination actually helps my digestion move along faster. That's key. You don't want food sitting inside you for long periods of time. There is some disgusting statistic that says the average American male has 5 lbs of meat in his gut. Imagine that for an SCI? You can decipher the implications. You want a quick turn around time. You should do this with food rather than laxatives. Once you have that going for yourself, it will transform your life.

  9. #29
    Back in the 60s or 70s there was a health guru...can't remember which one who advocated that you can't DIEt you need to find an eating plan to LIVEit. I still think that is good advice for today. Find an eating plan that maintains a sensible weight for you and make it your lifestyle. Don't eliminate all of the things you love to eat, just make a time to eat those things and in smaller portions. Eat and drink in MODERATION. Yes there may be times when you have over indulged and you'll need to atone for those times, but you can do that with MODERATION in mind. Denying yourself the tastes and flavors you love is just setting yourself up for failure. Eat what you like, but choose to eat only half or three quarters of the portion you would normally eat.
    Last edited by gjnl; 10-18-2017 at 12:20 AM.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    Ok, you got me going. Last one and I'm out for now. I leave you with my takeaway. Experiment with what you can eat rather than how much you can eat and you may no longer have to worry about quantity. Reset your body and start fresh with a pen and paper handy. Start with just meal replacement shakes for breakfast and lunch and lean protein with steamed veggies for dinner. After a week of this start reducing the shakes and adding more foods one at a time. You'll be amazed as to what you will learn about your body. Once you get into the habit it will become second nature to learn about food interacting with your body. I found that certain foods that disagree with me are no problem when combined with other foods. For example, nuts slow my digestion down to the point where I can't move. Keep that up and I'll put on weight not because of the calories but because they back me up. But I don't have a problem digesting nuts when combined with bananas and/or yogurt. That combination actually helps my digestion move along faster. That's key. You don't want food sitting inside you for long periods of time. There is some disgusting statistic that says the average American male has 5 lbs of meat in his gut. Imagine that for an SCI? You can decipher the implications. You want a quick turn around time. You should do this with food rather than laxatives. Once you have that going for yourself, it will transform your life.
    With all due respect, those statements are prime examples of what I was referring to before as pseudoscience. You put on weight because you consume more calories than you expend, and no, there's not 5 pounds of meat in every American male's intestines.

    If certain foods make you feel good, eat them. If certain foods make you feel bad, don't eat them. There's no special magic to combining foods, or eating for your blood type, or any of the other fad "guru" BS out there. At least nothing that has stood up to the tests of science. Gluten isn't the devil, artificial sweeteners aren't going to kill you, organic is not healthier than conventional, etc, etc.

    Eat a varied diet that includes a lot of fruits and vegetables, keep your portions in check, and exercise. Done.
    Last edited by paraparajumper; 10-17-2017 at 11:23 PM.

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