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Thread: Calories and weight loss.

  1. #131
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    good convo, everyone has an opinion. different things work for different ppl and some ppl(gj) are just thin.
    bottom line, theres only one way to lose weight that is CALORIE DEFICIT. how one gets that deficit is different for all.
    i love IF, to me its pretty simple but its not for everyone.,
    This is correct, sir.

  2. #132

    Sugar is not a treat.

    Sugar is not a treat.

    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  3. #133
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    I'm not fuentejps, but I'm jumping in here to say that if you google "insulin resistance spinal cord injury" and "quadriplegia and diabetes" you'll find many references to this. Here's one: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4231957/
    Did you read the abstract? "Within a few weeks to months of the injury, there is a significant decrease in total lean mass, particularly lower extremity muscle mass and an accompanying increase in fat mass. The infiltration of fat in intramuscular and visceral sites is associated with abnormal metabolic profiles. The current review will summarize the major changes in body composition and metabolic profiles that can lead to comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases after SCI..."

    This is saying changes in body composition can possibly increase your chances of developing Type 2 diabetes, just as an obese person's changes in body composition can lead to metabolic disease and Type 2 diabetes. This is NOT SAYING an SCI body acts like a diabetic body, as fuentejps said.

    I'm waiting for his response. Maybe other people considered that a very minor statement, or didn't think about it at all, but saying stuff like that without backing it up is not right. If it is the case, it's pretty interesting and I'd love to learn about it.

  4. #134
    Muscle spasms can be a terrible problem. But the cloud has a silver lining. Spasms help to maintain muscle mass and better circulation. Be happy if you have them.

  5. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    Muscle spasms can be a terrible problem. But the cloud has a silver lining. Spasms help to maintain muscle mass and better circulation. Be happy if you have them.
    Yes, I've often thought that spasticity and tone must burn calories and keep our muscles in some kind of order.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  6. #136
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    Muscle spasms can be a terrible problem. But the cloud has a silver lining. Spasms help to maintain muscle mass and better circulation. Be happy if you have them.
    That silver lining, especially if you maintain muscle on your butt, is huge. I have lost so much of my life, and now my body, to pressure sores. All because I'm so bony. I need a special orthoses seating system because otherwise, I will get a sore, it doesn't matter what cushion. I've lost both limbs, and now half my pelvis, because of bone infection and pressure sore.

    Most of my friends in a chair can sit all day, no skin problems, using an off the shelf cushion. I know spasms must suck when they're real bad, but I would choose that any day over a flacid and atrophic lower body. The grass is always greener on the other side huh?

  7. #137
    So sorry to hear this. Muscle spasms cause me lots of physical problems. One was so strong that it fractured my hip. You would think the small spasms wouldn't be a problem. But when they are back to back all day long, they add up and create anxiety. You're on edge just waiting for the next one, even when they aren't firing. Still, I have to admit it's better to deal with the spasms than losing muscle and skin problems. I hope you find a way and stay happy.

  8. #138

    The pros and cons of intermittent fasting.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/better/pop-culture/pros-cons-intermittent-fasting-ncna900961

    The pros and cons of intermittent fasting

    by Samantha Cassetty, RD / Aug.17.2018 / 4:09 PM ET



    If you're a fan of an all-or-nothing approach, or if you're someone who likes defined rules to follow, intermittent fasting could be worth trying.

    For most people, the word fasting brings up the notion of prolonged periods without food or maybe even drink. Some people fast periodically for religious reasons or medical necessity (say, before a procedure). But a new type of diet has people fasting to lose weight, improve health, live longer (and healthier), boost mental clarity, and more. Here's what you need to know about this trendy fast.

    Intermittent fasting may be practiced in a few different ways, according to research on the subject:


    • Alternate day fasting is just what it sounds like. On alternating days, you either feast or fast.
    • Modified fasting, also known as 5:2 intermittent fasting, involves eating normally five days a week with food restricted to about 25% of your calorie needs on two non-consecutive days. (Think: around 500 calories or less on restricted days.)
    • Time restricted fasting limits food within specific time windows, say 8 PM to 10 AM. In this type of fasting, you go 12 to 16 hours restricting food.

    Will you lose weight?

    These forms of fasting do appear to promote weight loss, according to a review study published in August, 2017. However, the science is thin among humans and typical studies involve small sample sizes and limited durations. Still, the outcomes suggest that people do lose weight so if you want to give it a go, here's what you should know.

    How does intermittent fasting work?

    There are a few things at play. Your circadian clock is actively involved in regulating your metabolism and many hormones, including the appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin, are subject to these day/night patterns. Studies have shown that eating the majority of food earlier in the day aligns more closely with our circadian rhythms, and disrupting these rhythms by eating late at night or say, eating in accordance with shift work, leads to a higher post-meal glucose response, prolonged insulin exposure, and a greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Beyond this, there's a behavioral component at play. Late night snacking can be a common practice (as any of us who have cozied up to a bowl of popcorn knows), and putting rules in place to offset this helps limit overeating.

    Jamie I. Baum, PhD, Associate Professor of Nutrition Director, Center for Human Nutrition at the Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, says that many plans, including intermittent fasting, are effective for weight loss, and that cutting calories (whether through intermittent fasting or another method) seems to be the main factor behind the slim down. In fact, one study published in JAMA comparing people who participated in alternate day fasting to those who were just on a standard, reduced-calorie diet found that there was no difference in weight loss or weight maintenance over the course of one year between the two groups.



    The best way to lose weight boils down to these three things (Video)

    What are some of the other benefits of intermittent fasting?

    According to Wayne B. Jonas, M.D., Executive Director of Samueli Integrative Health Programs, and author of the book "How Healing Works," restricting eating to daytime hours optimizes and extends your body's natural cleansing process, which may have other benefits, such as improved alertness and attention, lower body-wide inflammation, a reduced risk of illness, and promoting a longer (and healthier) life. To optimize this process, you need at least 10 to 12 hours without food intake, he says.

    It doesn't matter whether you're a night owl or a morning bird, he explains. The key is to stop eating a few hours before bed. "The food you eat before bed doesn't have a chance to be used as energy so not only does it promote fat storage, it interferes with the body's cleansing process."

    Dr. Jonas points to another benefit of intermittent fasting: eating more mindfully. There are so many social and environmental cues that prompt us to eat (and overeat) so adding some guardrails around when (and when not) to dine can help you reign in some of the grazing behaviors that aren't serving you well.

    Finally, poor sleep quality and getting insufficient sleep is a known risk factor for obesity and by restricting nighttime eating (and thus, reducing heartburn), you could get more sleep and the sleep you get may even be more satisfactory, which definitely brings health benefits.

    What are some of the downsides of intermittent fasting?

    Some studies find a higher drop out right among intermittent fasters, which suggests it might not be a sustainable approach. Plus, it might have other consequences. If, for instance, you're doing alternate day fasting and all you can think about on your fasting days is food, that can interfere with focus, and potentially your on-the-job performance. Plus, there may be social implications to intermittent fasting. Are your friends gathering for dinner at 7 and you're cut off from food at 6? You can see how this could interfere with your social life.

    There may be medical concerns as well. In this year-long study, unhealthy LDL cholesterol had increased significantly after 12 months among the alternate fasting group. This might spell trouble for your heart.

    Finally, I've heard of people using their non-fasting days to fill up on foods, like pizza, rich desserts, French fries and other fare that is low in nutrition and doesn't fuel a healthy body. Though you may still lose weight due to the calorie deficits on other days, you won't get the protective benefits of good nutrition.

    Who can benefit from intermittent fasting?

    If you?re a fan of an all-or-nothing approach, or if you're someone who likes defined rules to follow, intermittent fasting could be worth trying. It also might be especially good for people who participate in mindless snacking at night since the hard stop will curb this behavior.

    Who shouldn't try intermittent fasting?

    Do not attempt fasting if you've had an eating disorder or signs of disordered eating, which include (but aren't limited to) binge eating, food obsession, misuse of laxatives and extreme food restriction. If you're pregnant or breast feeding, you should not attempt intermittent fasting. Anyone being treated for diabetes (with medications) as well as anyone with cancer and those with a compromised immune system should also avoid intermittent fasting (or speak to their doctor before trying it).

    What should know before you give it go

    If you do try it, make your calories count by choosing wholesome foods that do a good job filling you up. Focus on a variety of veggies to make sure you get an array of healthy compounds, along with quality protein sources (such as eggs, skinless poultry, tuna and other seafood), which do a good job keeping hunger at bay. Balance out your meals with fruits and whole grains. If you're doing an alternate fasting diet, you'll want to pay really close attention to lower calorie foods that create volume, both on your plate and in your belly. Remember, as with any sensible eating plan, non-starchy vegetables are your friends.

    Experts believe that the real key to lasting weight lies in how you handle the maintenance phase.

    And don't forget, it's not a magic bullet. Experts believe that the real key to lasting weight lies in how you handle the maintenance phase. "It's not easy, but a lot of people do successfully lose weight," says Dr. Jonas. "You need to pay attention to what you eat, how much you eat, and how you're supporting that process" either with a group or a friend or a healthcare professional to keep you accountable and help you manage the normal slip-ups that are a part of life."
    Last edited by titanium4motion; 08-18-2018 at 12:55 AM.
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  9. #139
    Bonnette, how was your first week. short week here, out of town for getaway with wifey th/fr so weighed in thurs morning, same as last saturday. 4 days off this week.........will hit it hard next week to get my last 2 off.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

  10. #140
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    Bonnette, how was your first week. short week here, out of town for getaway with wifey th/fr so weighed in thurs morning, same as last saturday. 4 days off this week.........will hit it hard next week to get my last 2 off.
    Those out of town days are double-edged swords, you want to get away but you know the diet will stall!

    My first week went fine, the hunger on fast days was bad for a few hours but then it subsided and I filled the time I would have been thinking about food with reading and watching old movies. I don't know how much weight I lost, because I decided to weigh myself on Mondays - but I feel lighter and also noticed that my left leg and foot, which are usually a little swollen, look less puffy. The hardest thing for me so far is getting it through my head that I can eat whatever I want today and tomorrow - the temptation to stick to 1000 cal/day is powerful. I made a slow start by having a hearty breakfast that was still under 800 calories, so that I can ease my way into the weekend pattern.

    It's great that you're down to the last 2 pounds! (hey, it's Saturday, we can raise a glass). Will post again on Monday after weighing in.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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