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Thread: Calories and weight loss.

  1. #121
    One thing that hasn't been discussed in this post is body type. It does make a difference.

    Ectomorph,Mesomorph,Endomorph

    http://www.superskinnyme.com/body-types.html

  2. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by paraparajumper View Post
    Not so sure about that. I would agree our metabolisms change and our BMRs decrease due to a more sedentary lifestyle and loss of muscle mass, but I can't find anything that talks about hormonal change when it comes to insulin, just because someone is paralyzed. If you do have something, pass it along, I'd be interested in reading.
    I'm not fuentejps, but I'm jumping in here to say that if you google "insulin resistance spinal cord injury" and "quadriplegia and diabetes" you'll find many references to this. Here's one: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4231957/
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  3. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    One thing that hasn't been discussed in this post is body type. It does make a difference.

    Ectomorph,Mesomorph,Endomorph

    http://www.superskinnyme.com/body-types.html
    I don't know...agree in principle, but it seems like with SCI, all bets are off. The former ectomorph can end up with a large volume of abdominal fat due to paralysis, and the metabolic picture changes when that happens.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  4. #124

    Article is ambiguous.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    I'm not fuentejps, but I'm jumping in here to say that if you google "insulin resistance spinal cord injury" and "quadriplegia and diabetes" you'll find many references to this. Here's one: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4231957/
    This article is very ambiguous. The people they studied are they people who gained weight post SCI or studied people who did not gain weight post SCI like myself? The article did not say.

    AB people who gain weight develop diabetes too.

    My body is not like a diabetic person. I also maintain a stable lean weight and avoid by all means to gain 5 pounds, 10 pounds, 20 pounds or 45 pounds. I've learned how to eat clean, wholesome foods and live a healthy lifestyle.

    Gaining weight, loosing weight, gaining weight and loosing weight is not a good lifestyle to live. You have to eat to loose weight. You starve or fast yourself your metabolism naturally slows down. That is a known fact.

    As you age your metabolism naturally slows down. That is also a known fact. There are things you can do to keep your metabolism burning energy (fat) faster, e.g. exercise, drink ice cold water.

    Believe me, I know what it is to be obese. I tipped the scale at 300 pounds when I was a sophomore in high school. I lost the weight and kept it off for the last 40+ years. I know how to get through the holidays without gaining weight too. I have pictures to prove it.

    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  5. #125

    For Your Information

    FYI

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(h. kg). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met.


    Here are 10 easy ways to increase your metabolism.


    1. Eat Plenty of Protein at Every Meal. Eating food can increase your metabolism for a few hours. ...
    2. Drink More Cold Water. ...
    3. Do a High-Intensity Workout. ...
    4. Lift Heavy Things. ...
    5. Stand up More. ...
    6. Drink Green Tea or Oolong Tea. ...
    7. Eat Spicy Foods. ...
    8. Get a Good Night's Sleep.
    9. Drink coffee.
    10. Replace cooking fats with coconut oil.



    Ti
    Credits: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...olism#section9

    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  6. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    I don't know...agree in principle, but it seems like with SCI, all bets are off. The former ectomorph can end up with a large volume of abdominal fat due to paralysis, and the metabolic picture changes when that happens.
    I am 73 year old, 36 years post injury. I am an ectomorph body type. I've been an ectomorph body type since forever. When NL and I were married in 1969, I was 6'4" tall, weighed 145 pounds and was consuming 6000 calories per day.

    I am 6'3" tall, weigh 125-130 pounds. I don't fast. I don't count calories. I drink wine with dinner. I eat two meals a day, i.e., a late breakfast and dinner. I eat peanut butter on brown rice cakes, fruit smoothies made with yogurt, eggs, pasta, bread, chicken, fish, and lots of fruits and vegetables and chocolate.

    I can't exercise much (I don't bike like fuentejps), except for some light weight lifting. I can't stand on a frame anymore because of severe osteoporosis.

    Yes... I think that body type, possibly the metabolism within these body types has a lot to do with how our bodies deal with calories.

    I know most people hate that I can generally eat just about anything I want to eat and don't have a weight problem. How do you explain it...not sure...but I do empathize with those of you who struggle as discussed in this post.

  7. #127
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    I am 73 year old, 36 years post injury. I am an ectomorph body type. I've been an ectomorph body type since forever. When NL and I were married in 1969, I was 6'4" tall, weighed 145 pounds and was consuming 6000 calories per day.

    I am 6'3" tall, weigh 125-130 pounds. I don't fast. I don't count calories. I drink wine with dinner. I eat two meals a day, i.e., a late breakfast and dinner. I eat peanut butter on brown rice cakes, fruit smoothies made with yogurt, eggs, pasta, bread, chicken, fish, and lots of fruits and vegetables and chocolate.

    I can't exercise much (I don't bike like fuentejps), except for some light weight lifting. I can't stand on a frame anymore because of severe osteoporosis.

    Yes... I think that body type, possibly the metabolism within these body types has a lot to do with how our bodies deal with calories.

    I know most people hate that I can generally eat just about anything I want to eat and don't have a weight problem. How do you explain it...not sure...but I do empathize with those of you who struggle as discussed in this post.
    I don't know how to explain it either, especially with NL's fantastic cooking and baking! But it's wonderful and you're very fortunate.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  8. #128

    6 Mistakes That Slow Down Your Metabolism

    6 Mistakes That Slow Down Your Metabolism

    Keeping your metabolism high is crucial for losing weight and keeping it off.

    Unfortunately, there are several common lifestyle mistakes that may be slowing down your metabolism.

    Doing these on a regular basis could make it hard to lose weight and make you more prone to weight gain in the future.

    Here are 6 lifestyle mistakes that can slow down your metabolism.

    1. Eating Too Few Calories

    Eating too few calories can cause a major decrease in metabolism.

    Although a calorie deficit is needed for weight loss, it can be counterproductive for your calorie intake to drop too low.

    When you dramatically lower your calorie intake, your body senses that food is scarce and lowers the rate at which it burns calories.

    Controlled studies on lean and overweight people have confirmed that consuming less than 1,000 calories per day can have a significant impact on your metabolic rate (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

    Most studies measure resting metabolic rate, which is the number of calories burned during rest. However, some also measure calories burned during rest and activity over 24 hours, which is referred to as total daily energy expenditure.

    In one study, when obese women ate 420 calories per day for four to six months, their resting metabolic rates slowed down significantly.

    What's more, even after they increased their calorie intake over the following five weeks, their resting metabolic rates remained much lower than before the diet (3).

    In another study, overweight people were asked to consume 890 calories per day. After three months, the total number of calories they burned per day was found to have dropped by 633 calories, on average (4).

    It appears that even when calorie restriction is more moderate, it can slow metabolism somewhat.

    In a four-day study of 32 people, the resting metabolic rate of people who ate 1,114 calories per day slowed more than twice as much as of those who consumed 1,462 calories daily. However, weight loss was similar for both groups (5).

    If you're going to lose weight by calorie restriction, then don't restrict your calorie intake too much or for too long.
    Bottom Line: Cutting calories too much and for too long lowers metabolic rate, which can make weight loss and weight maintenance more difficult.

    2. Skimping on Protein

    Eating enough protein is extremely important for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.

    Studies have shown that, in addition to helping you feel full, a high protein intake can significantly increase the rate at which your body burns calories (6, 7, 8).

    The increase in metabolism that occurs after digestion is called the thermic effect of food (TEF).

    The thermic effect of protein is much higher than the thermic effects of carbs or fat. Indeed, eating protein has been observed to temporarily increase metabolism by about 20?30%, versus 5?10% for carbs and 3% or less for fat (9).

    Although metabolic rate inevitably slows during weight loss and continues to be slower during weight maintenance, there's evidence that higher protein intake can minimize this effect.

    In one study, participants followed one of three diets in an effort to maintain a 10?15% weight loss.

    The diet highest in protein reduced participants' total daily energy expenditure by only 97 calories, versus a decrease of 297?423 calories in people who consumed less protein (10).

    Another study found that people needed to eat at least 0.5 grams of protein per pound (1.2 grams/kg) of their body weight in order to prevent their metabolism from slowing during and after weight loss (11).
    Bottom Line: Protein increases metabolic rate more than carbs or fat. Increased protein intake helps preserve metabolic rate during weight loss and maintenance.

    3. Leading a Sedentary Lifestyle

    Being sedentary may lead to a significant decrease in the number of calories you burn every day.

    Unfortunately, many people have lifestyles that mainly involve sitting at work, which can have negative effects on metabolic rate and overall health (12).

    Although working out or playing sports can have a major impact on the number of calories you burn, even basic physical activity such as standing up, cleaning and taking the stairs can help you burn calories.

    This type of activity is referred to as non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT).

    One study found that performing a high amount of NEAT regularly could burn up to 2,000 additional calories per day. However, such a dramatic increase is not realistic for most people (13).

    Another study found that watching TV while you're sitting burns an average of 8% fewer calories than typing while you're sitting and an average of 16% fewer calories than standing (14).

    Working at a standing desk or simply getting up to walk around several times per day can help increase your NEAT and prevent your metabolism from dropping.
    Bottom Line: Being inactive reduces the number of calories you burn during the day. Try to minimize sitting and increase your general activity levels.

    4. Not Getting Enough High-Quality Sleep

    Sleep is extremely important for good health.

    Sleeping fewer hours than you need may increase your risk of a number of diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and depression (15).

    Several studies have found that inadequate sleep may also lower your metabolic rate and increase your likelihood of weight gain (16, 17, 18).

    One study found that healthy adults who slept four hours per night for five nights in a row experienced a 2.6% decrease in resting metabolic rate, on average.

    Participants' resting metabolic rate returned to normal following 12 hours of uninterrupted sleep (17).

    Lack of sleep is made worse by sleeping during the day instead of at night. This sleep pattern disrupts your body's circadian rhythms, the biological changes in your body that occur in response to light and darkness over a 24-hour cycle.

    A five-week study found that prolonged sleep restriction combined with circadian rhythm disruption significantly decreased participants' resting metabolic rate by an average of 8% (18).
    Bottom Line: Getting adequate, high-quality sleep and sleeping at night rather than during the day can help preserve your metabolic rate.

    5. Drinking Sugary Beverages

    Sugar-sweetened drinks are the absolute worst beverages for health.

    A high consumption of sodas and other sugary drinks has been linked to all sorts of health problems, including insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity (19, 20).

    Most of the negative effects of sugar-sweetened beverages can be attributed to fructose. Table sugar contains 50% fructose, while high-fructose corn syrup contains 55% fructose.

    Results from a 2012 study suggest that frequently consuming sugar-sweetened beverages may slow down your metabolism.

    In this 12-week controlled study, overweight and obese people who consumed 25% of their calories as fructose-sweetened beverages on a weight-maintaining diet experienced a significant drop in metabolic rate (21).

    Unfortunately, there aren't many studies that have measured how metabolic rate is affected by a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages.
    However, research in animals and humans has shown that excessive fructose consumption promotes increased fat storage in the belly and liver (22, 23, 24, 25, 26).
    Bottom Line: A high intake of fructose-containing beverages has been found to reduce metabolic rate and promote fat storage in the belly and liver.

    6. A Lack of Resistance Training

    Working out with weights is a great strategy to keep your metabolism from slowing down.

    Strength training has been shown to increase metabolic rate in healthy people, as well as those who have heart disease or are overweight or obese (27, 28, 29, 30).

    Resistance training increases muscle mass, which makes up much of the fat-free mass in your body. Having a higher amount of fat-free mass significantly increases the number of calories you burn at rest (31, 32, 33).

    Fortunately, doing even minimal amounts of strength training appears to boost energy expenditure.

    In a six-month study, people who performed resistance training for 11 minutes per day for three days a week experienced a 7.4% increase in resting metabolic rate and burned 125 extra calories per day, on average (34).

    In contrast, not doing any strength training can cause your metabolic rate to decline, especially during weight loss and as you get older (31, 35, 36).
    Bottom Line: Resistance training increases muscle mass and helps preserve metabolic rate during weight loss and aging.

    Take Home Message

    Engaging in lifestyle behaviors that slow down your metabolism can lead to weight gain over time. It's best to avoid or minimize them as much as possible.
    Fortunately, there are also many things that can boost your metabolism to help you lose weight and keep it off.
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  9. #129
    My friend uses an Android application that is very useful

  10. #130
    good convo, everyone has an opinion. different things work for different ppl and some ppl(gj) are just thin.
    bottom line, theres only one way to lose weight that is CALORIE DEFICIT. how one gets that deficit is different for all.
    i love IF, to me its pretty simple but its not for everyone.,
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

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