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Thread: colony count

  1. #1

    colony count

    Always had deep pelvic pain and always thought it was bladder related. Possibly bladder spasm, chronic colonization/infection, whatever.

    I'm going in for Botox, having done it close to a dozen times already, and recently did the preadmission testing, which included urine culture. Turns out I had a colony count of over 100,000. Anything over 10,000 typically gets treated with antibiotic. I didn't have fever or other UTI symptoms, except for as I said deep pelvic spasmodic pain. Five months ago and seven months ago I had cultures in which I had colony counts, right around 10,000. I declined antibiotic at that time, trying to not abuse it for cases of colonization.

    All three cultures were for the same bacteria, Enterobacter cloacae.

    So if I can have a colony count of over 100,000 and not have a fever, what does that say about when one should do a culture and if necessary, treat, even though one does not have the signs and symptoms we usually get?

  2. #2
    I think your urologist might have something to say about that high of a count and whether he feels comfortable doing a procedure like Botox. Have you gotten any feedback from him/her about this? Your doctor may want to treat this high of a count symptoms or no symptoms because he doesn't want complications to arise from the Botox injections. When I have had Botox injections, the doctor has given me a couple 500mg Cipro to take after the procedure, to be on the safe side.

    As an aside, you are having a good run with Botox, i.e., nearly a dozen Botox procedures. My experience with Botox was first one great, second one good, third one disappointing, fourth one nothing.

  3. #3
    Hi, I recently had a colony count of over 100,000 of Klebsiella Pneumonia in my urine culture with no symptoms and no blood or white blood cells or anything in my Urinalysis. I felt fine. My regular doctor told me to take Cranberry & D-Mannose pills for at least two weeks and if it didn't clear up he'd send me to an infection specialist. My culture after two weeks showed no growth of any kind. I guess it could have been the pills. They're sold in GNC and other places and are not expensive. It could be worth a try. I'm going to keep taking them.

  4. #4
    D-mannose is a naturally occurring sugar that sticks to E. coli bacteria that most commonly causes UTIs, so it can be effectively “rinsed” out when you urinate. Usually D-mannose is taken to help prevent urinary tract infections, but generally is only effective in preventing E. coli bacteria caused infections.

    The SCI nurses have commented on the use of Cranberry supplements. Their comments indicate that urine needs to be exposed cranberry in the bladder for four hours or more to be effective to help prevent or cure a urinary tract infection. So. if you use a condom catheter or have an indwelling catheter that is constantly draining, the supplement is just constantly moving through the bladder and draining.

    Never the less, whatever caused your urinalysis and culture & sensitivity to go show now bacteria, no growth is great. Hope it continues to work for you.

  5. #5
    I currently take a pretty large dose of cranberry concentrate, four capsules a day a.m./p.m., that I get from Puritans pride. I haven't used d-mannose in years, maybe it's worth a shot.

    The doctor did put me on antibiotic to clear up the infection before the procedure.

    I have had Botox about 10 times. But I'm going to keep a close eye on it this time and if it doesn't make that much of the difference or last at least six months maybe I'll stop. The most I will do it is once per year, and even that is a pain in the ass.

    I always have tremendous neurogenic burning, deep pelvic spasm. I would think if an able-bodied person had over 100,000 colony count their pelvis in their bladder area would be most painful. So, though a while I may not have fever, chronic colonization and they resulted irritation to the bladder may be the reason why I have serious pelvic pain.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by crags View Post
    So if I can have a colony count of over 100,000 and not have a fever, what does that say about when one should do a culture and if necessary, treat, even though one does not have the signs and symptoms we usually get?
    In general asymptomatic bacteriuria (what you describe above bacteria in the urine but no symptoms), is not treated except in pregnant women and healthy males. Most clinicians would probably consider a colony count of 10,000 not to be an infection. 100,000 is basically the "cut off" of whether or not you have an infection, which is why they stop recording at that point.

    So to answer your question - no you shouldn't treat it if you don't have symptoms.

    However if a doc is about to go punch a bunch of holes in your bladder he might want to try and get your urine pretty clean before he goes in there and shoves all those bacteria into the wall of your bladder with his botox gun.

  7. #7
    There are a few exceptions to that rule.
    When you are having Botox to the bladder( or any urological procedure any & every organism(s) should be treated with antibiotics and the urine cleaned.
    This is a surgery and a needle is stuck in to the middle layer of your bladder- they do not want to make it worse. It must be treated or Urology won't do the procedure! Nor should they!
    You also must have clean urine before a baclofen pump implantation and other surgeries. BECAUSE you immune system is down and if you get a UTI from your invested urine, the symptoms of meningitis, pneumonia and other infections is similiar. So getting the urine clean with antibiotics before hand is highly recommended ( and is the protocol for most).
    CWO
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  8. #8
    Another issue to rule out would be chronic prostatitis. This could cause you to continue to shed bacteria into your urine, of the same strain. Ask your urologist to work you up. A enlarged prostate, and elevated PSA is often found in prostatitis, but is also there for prostate cancer or even benign prostatic hypertrophy. Treatment of prostatitis may require 6-8 weeks of oral antibiotics (specific to the bacteria found) as the prostate protects the bacteria from the antibiotic.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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