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Thread: Anyone have a 75 degree front angle?

  1. #1

    Anyone have a 75 degree front angle?

    My TiLite with a 90 degree front angle has the front tubes about 6" ahead of the seat sling. This extra length interferes with transfers. I would like to minimize this distance. The only way to do this without changing anything else is to decrease the front angle as much as possible. I calculate the angle can be less than 75 degrees. It would require a pretty tight turn radius but it may be possible. Before I commit to this, I would like to see some pictures. Does anyone have a picture of a TR with 75 degree front angle?

    By the way, an additional benefit is that luggage and shopping baskets rest better on luggage racks at 75 degrees than 90 degrees.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by August West; 09-30-2017 at 05:48 PM. Reason: added drawing

  2. #2
    Mine is 85 so not much less than your current chair. One thing to consider is you are bringing the casters closer and closer to the wheels. I know I already have to be careful about leaning forward in my chair if the casters are rotated toward the back as I can lift those back wheels off the ground fairly easily.

  3. #3
    I have 80 or 85 degree front, not sure which. When I had 75 I found it more difficult to transfer as front of footrest bumped my transfer target.

  4. #4
    I have a 2" tapered seat and custom tapered footrest so that my footrest inside width is just adequate for my widest shoes. I find a narrow footrest helps me with transfers, no big, square front end.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    One thing to consider is you are bringing the casters closer and closer to the wheels.
    Good point. There's that trade-off.
    Last edited by August West; 09-30-2017 at 07:48 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ancientgimp View Post
    I have 80 or 85 degree front, not sure which. When I had 75 I found it more difficult to transfer as front of footrest bumped my transfer target.
    I know what you are saying. The solution is to make the frame depth shorter than the seat depth so that the bend starts under the cushion rather than in front of the cushion. Otherwise, the footrest will stick out more.

    I've tried the narrow footrest (11"). The problem is that I like to transfer out with my feet on the footrest for the additional height. In that case, feet get trapped in the narrow footrest during the transfer. Hence, I like the footrest to be 12" rather than 11". For transferring in I'm going with a flip-back foot rest, which enables getting closer.
    Last edited by August West; 09-30-2017 at 07:53 PM.

  7. #7
    i was going to say that i think they would still start to bend the frame for the 75 degree angle at the same point as the 90 degree one so as a result the footplate would stick out further, if they start to bend it further back it could interfere with your cushion etc

  8. #8
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    From previous threads here, mostly by SCI_OTR, I clearly recall him indicating that Tilite adds +1" to the tubing, prior to the bend, when selecting a 90deg. frame. So, switching to an 85deg frame would start the bend 1" farther back.

    Perhaps an even more important measurement (at least for fit), is what's been called "occupied frame length", which is the distance between the leading edge of the backrest and the leading edge of the footrest.

    Altering the front end angles will change this, often significantly. While you may end up with the clearance you want at the top of the bend, your feet and knees will be bent differently and in different locations than they are currently.

    I would suggest starting with the desired "occupied frame length" and allowing the other dimensions be derived from that.

    This could enable having the most possible top side clearance while maintaining your seated fit.
    Last edited by Oddity; 10-01-2017 at 11:42 AM.
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by rAdGie View Post
    i was going to say that i think they would still start to bend the frame for the 75 degree angle at the same point as the 90 degree one so as a result the footplate would stick out further, if they start to bend it further back it could interfere with your cushion etc
    Yes it could. In my case, the frame depth (backrest front to start of bend) is 1" longer than the seat depth (backrest front to seat sling front), which is 1" longer than the cushion. I could reduce the frame depth by 3" and the bend would start just 1" behind the cushion (see the picture below) resulting in a 1/8" height difference between the cushion front and bend (4" radius). That's negligible.


    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    From previous threads here, mostly by SCI_OTR, I clearly recall him indicating that Tilite adds +1" to the tubing, prior to the bend, when selecting a 90deg. frame. So, switching to an 85deg frame would start the bend 1" farther back.
    Correct about their older order forms. Their present order forms specify 0.5" additional tubing regardless of angle unless otherwise specified. But their latest drawings still show 1". Aren't the drawing supposed to be to scale?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    Perhaps an even more important measurement (at least for fit), is what's been called "occupied frame length", which is the distance between the leading edge of the backrest and the leading edge of the footrest.

    Altering the front end angles will change this, often significantly. While you may end up with the clearance you want at the top of the bend, your feet and knees will be bent differently and in different locations than they are currently.

    I would suggest starting with the desired "occupied frame length" and allowing the other dimensions be derived from that.

    This could enable having the most possible top side clearance while maintaining your seated fit.
    Excellent recommendation to start with the occupied frame length and then backtrack. Doing that and reducing the frame depth by 3" would result in an 80deg angle. Or reducing the occupied frame length by 2" and reducing the frame depth by 3" would result in an 85deg angle.

    Regardless, you are correct, the angle is secondary. The primary dimensions are occupied frame length and frame depth.

    By the way, in case you are wondering why I am talking about a TR but showing a ZR drawing, this is the CAD drawing that TiLite sent. The second CAD drawing which usually costs $75 is going to be on them.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #10
    looking at those cads id rather have the 90 degree version as knee protectors :P you could tell them your cushion is 1 - 2 inches shorter than it actually is? then when you put it on you will have the 90 degree frame and it will start as it leaves your cushion, does that make sense?

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