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Thread: DIY Pulse Irrigation for $20

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by emanshiu View Post
    how does it stay in?
    I hold the cath like this (with a glove of course):



    I press on my anus / hemorrhoid to keep the water in. It usually goes 200 ~ 300 mL before I start to dribble. When I release, there is a flood of water / poop. I do two or three cycles of this.

    The cath usually stays in no problem, but if it comes out, I use the cath to rinse around the anal area, flush the toilet, rinse the cath and glove in the bowl, and put the cath back in. This is pretty rare, and not as gross as it sounds. I have only been doing this for 6 days, and I am surprised how clean it all is. Pretty much poop from colon to bowl to drain with minimal fuss.

    I found a source for a stoma cone that is a bit less expensive than goldpharma -- medicalmonks.com/product/coloplast-stoma-cone/ They also sell cones by Convatec and Hollister. I am planning on ordering one from each manufacturer to try out.

    Also, I just received an order of silicone tubing. This was pricier than the Home Depot vinyl, but the greater flexibility makes it clearly worth it. When I get everything as I want it I will publish a complete list of supplies. I think it can be done for less than $35 for two decent quality setups.
    Last edited by gac3rd; 09-29-2017 at 10:58 PM.
    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

  2. #22
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    This picture did not post. Here is my next try
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

  3. #23
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    [QUOTE=gjnl;1840892]Not sure what I am even looking at in the photo below...not sure I want to know.

    The black thing is a marine transfer fuel pump, a squeeze bulb pump, with a 6 mm inlet / outlet. Look for enema pump on eBay for the versions made for enemas if you want a different color. The fuel transfer pumps are the same thing, but appear to be much higher quality. The vinyl tube coming out of the bottom of the pump goes to a gallon jug with about 2 ~ 3 liters of warm water. The vinyl tubing coming from the top of the pump goes to a 14 Fr Coloplast Self-Cath catheter, which goes in my colon. Three squeezes on my pump transfer 100 mL of water from the jug to my colon.

    As explained above, I am going to try replacing the catheter with a stoma cone. This setup is essentially a Peristeen with a regular catheter rather than a Foley catheter - and of course a lot cheaper. With the stoma cone, it will be a manual version of a IryPump.

    I just wanted to try something at finite cost to see if colon irrigation made any sense at all for me. It does, and it is being done at reasonable expense. Of course, you need the hand function to insert and hold the catheter or cone, and to squeeze the bulb. I have a friend, another 50 year para, who will probably try one with a Foley catheter. He can squeeze the pump, but holding the catheter or cone in place might be a problem for him.

    It may look funny, but I am tired of paying hundreds, thousands, of dollars for a few dollars worth of equipment. And it is working well for me.
    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

  4. #24
    [QUOTE=gac3rd;1840901]
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Not sure what I am even looking at in the photo below...not sure I want to know.

    The black thing is a marine transfer fuel pump, a squeeze bulb pump, with a 6 mm inlet / outlet. Look for enema pump on eBay for the versions made for enemas if you want a different color. The fuel transfer pumps are the same thing, but appear to be much higher quality. The vinyl tube coming out of the bottom of the pump goes to a gallon jug with about 2 ~ 3 liters of warm water. The vinyl tubing coming from the top of the pump goes to a 14 Fr Coloplast Self-Cath catheter, which goes in my colon. Three squeezes on my pump transfer 100 mL of water from the jug to my colon.

    As explained above, I am going to try replacing the catheter with a stoma cone. This setup is essentially a Peristeen with a regular catheter rather than a Foley catheter - and of course a lot cheaper. With the stoma cone, it will be a manual version of a IryPump.

    I just wanted to try something at finite cost to see if colon irrigation made any sense at all for me. It does, and it is being done at reasonable expense. Of course, you need the hand function to insert and hold the catheter or cone, and to squeeze the bulb. I have a friend, another 50 year para, who will probably try one with a Foley catheter. He can squeeze the pump, but holding the catheter or cone in place might be a problem for him.

    It may look funny, but I am tired of paying hundreds, thousands, of dollars for a few dollars worth of equipment. And it is working well for me.

    How do you keep it in? Peristeen has a bilb that keeps it in

  5. #25
    This looks very interesting and practical. The only concerns I have are megacolon, which MAY develop in some people and the fact that you are doing basically high colon enemas, which reportedly (in the past) are not good for you. As long as you keep the pressure on the bulb within reason and don't go shooting several hundred mls of water into your colon at once, I don't see any reason not to try it. The other caution is to make sure that when you instill the catheter, you do it gently. I would be interested in hearing other people's stories.
    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    This looks very interesting and practical. The only concerns I have are megacolon, which MAY develop in some people and the fact that you are doing basically high colon enemas, which reportedly (in the past) are not good for you. As long as you keep the pressure on the bulb within reason and don't go shooting several hundred mls of water into your colon at once, I don't see any reason not to try it. The other caution is to make sure that when you instill the catheter, you do it gently. I would be interested in hearing other people's stories.
    ckf
    I've irrigated with the Irypump every morning or every other morning for almost 2 years now. I instill 1000 mL at a time. According to paperwork I've read, it's not abnormal for this amount (800-1500mL). I had a contrast CT scan on my anus/descending colon due to nerve pain and it was unremarkable, but should I get something else checked out?

    I'm definitely putting several hundred mls in my colon at once.

  7. #27
    I would think that you are probably ok with that amount. My biggest concern is >1000 (approximately) and high pressure. Also, getting autonomic dysreflexia from the installation. I would check with your physician (preferably a GI one) and make sure that he doesn't think you need anything else.
    I am pretty open to different ideas as long as they appear safe and work. So if it works and you are not seeing any complications, I say go for it.
    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    This looks very interesting and practical. The only concerns I have are megacolon, which MAY develop in some people and the fact that you are doing basically high colon enemas, which reportedly (in the past) are not good for you. As long as you keep the pressure on the bulb within reason and don't go shooting several hundred mls of water into your colon at once, I don't see any reason not to try it. The other caution is to make sure that when you instill the catheter, you do it gently. I would be interested in hearing other people's stories.
    ckf

    what are some of the warning signs of megacolon?

  9. #29
    Interesting article: https://www.nature.com/sc/journal/v3.../3101010a.html

    Megacolon in patients with chronic spinal cord injury
    Abstract

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and functional correlates of megacolon in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI).

    Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 128 patients consecutively admitted to a SCI in-patient service in a US Veterans Administration Medical Centre (mean age 57?15 years, mean years since injury 20?13, 97% male) who underwent plain abdominal radiography for study purposes. Participants were characterised by radiological findings. `Megacolon' was defined as colonic dilatation of >6 cms in one or more colonic segment(s). Clinical, functional, and medication data were abstracted from the medical and nursing records. Individual interviews were conducted with study participants regarding bowel-related symptoms and treatment over the previous 1-month period.

    Results: Seventy-three per cent of subjects (n=94) had megacolon, and 52% of these individuals had associated radiological constipation. Subjects with megacolon were compared with those without colonic dilatation (n=34). Factors significantly associated with megacolon were older age, longer duration of injury, symptom of abdominal distension, radiological constipation, urinary outlet surgery, laxative use at least once weekly, use of anticholinergic drugs, and use of calcium-containing antacids. These factors were simultaneously included in a multiple logistic regression model. Independent correlates of megacolon were more than 10 years elapsed since acute injury, age over 50 years, and use of 4 laxative doses per month.
    Conclusion: Megacolon is a highly prevalent disorder in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury. Our findings suggest that the presence of megacolon may be predicted in older individuals, and in those who are more than 10 years post-SCI. We also found that clinical constipation was frequently present in individuals with megacolon, despite their significantly greater use of laxatives.

    Sponsorship: This work was supported by a grant from the Claude D Pepper Geriatric Research and Training Center from the National Institute of Ageing-AG08812-05, and a grant from the Education and Training Foundation of the Paralyzed Veterans Association in the USA. Dr Harari is currently recipient of a grant from Action Research (UK).

    Spinal Cord (2000) 38, 331-339.

    From the Christopher and Dana Reeve website: http://www.spinalcordinjury-paralysi...ic/11775/54809

    Megacolon

    When the bowel is not evacuated appropriately, a problem called megacolon can arise. This is a complication that is associated with particularly with neurological injury. If the bowel is not emptied, the stool in the colon can block the bowel which then has no way to eliminate further collection of stool and gas. The bowel above the blockage will distend. With megacolon, it becomes so stretched that the bowel cannot return to its normal size. This over dilated bowel does not have the ability to move stool through it as it is too large to move waste. Performing the bowel program will reduce your chance of developing this condition. Some people who do develop a mild case will be able to continue their bowel program however, if the condition gets out of hand, surgery will be necessary.

    Megacolon symtoms may be hard to spot in the spinal cord injury population because so many of the symptoms are so common in the population.

    Megacolon symptoms

    May observe any of the following:
    • Abdominal distention
    • Failure to thrive
    • Delayed to no passage of stool
    • Bloating
    • Constipation
    • Diarrhea (usually with a foul odor)
    • Diarrhea interspersed with bouts of constipation
    • Impacted fecal matter visible in the rectum
    • Unusually shaped stools (large, blunt, broken, cylindrical)
    • Imperforate anus/anal atresia (abnormal or missing rectal opening)


    Also see comments by Dr. Young at post #9, Abstract comments for #6 at this Care Cure Community thread: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...e-a-connection



  10. #30
    This Care Cure Community thread mentions a product called Flowmaster. Has anyone used this system. http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...ght=flowmaster

    Optimal Health Network: https://www.optimalhealthnetwork.com...nse-s/1026.htm

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