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Thread: Right lower abdominal pain

  1. #11
    Your weight loss is very concerning.

    Have you had a colonoscopy? When?

    Are you seeing a gastroenterologist, and do they have any knowledge about SCI / neurogenic bowel?

    By the way, you are not taking many pills for your age.... especially for someone with SCI as long as you have had it! You should see what my 74 year old father takes.....

  2. #12
    I would want to know that any gall bladder problems have been ruled out. They are common in people with SCI, and eating food, especially food that contains fat, can trigger this type of pain.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #13
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    Had colonoscopy about 2 months ago, also had MRI, Ultra sound, xray, blood tests etc, thought among this lot gall bladder issues would have been noted? I seem to have this pain constantly but maybe it does get worse with eating fats, not sure as I am pretty confused, not sleeping well means my anxiety is worse. but thank you for the suggestion. I have had some very black days that have put me in a scary place.

  4. #14
    You can have cholecystitis (inflammed or infected gall bladder) without gall stones. Check it out.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #15
    sounds gallbladder to me although when mine was giving me trouble it was upper right sided pain almost right under my ribs. eating fats definitely made it worse and still do really even after having mine out for a few years. i would recommend a consult with gastro guy and have him specifically look for gallbladder issues by doing either an ecrp or a EUS or even an mrcp these tests specifically look for gallbladder disease. and i would also be concerned if you weren't specifically trying to lose weight the amount of weight you have lost in that short amount of time is pretty extreme. also colitis can cause it as well. my mother has lymphocytic colitis and it is horrible literally almost everything bothers her, she is down to literally a handful of foods that she can eat. and it needs to be totally gluten free, dairy free and sugar free! no raw fruits or veggies which is limited to only carrots and green beans and they need to be cooked thourghly. also no red meat, which isn't a problem since we eat mainly fish and chicken anyway.
    T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

  6. #16
    I suffered with similar problems that befuddled Western medicine. Finally, a G.I. that practices wholistic integrative medicine was able to help me. Ironically, many of her patients come from an inflammatory Bowel disease special considered to be the best in the United States who couldn't help them.

    Have you had any bowel surgery? Many of my issues related to removal of the ileocecal valve that was used for a bladder augmentation. This is the valve that holds back the bacteria from the large intestine to entering into the small intestine. Its also an area where mineral absorption occurs and ph changes. In addition to pain, there was bloating and weight loss from lack of nutrition.

    ileocecal valves can get stuck too. Youtube has a few worthwhile ileocecal massage videos.

    Looks like you pay close attention to your diet. My health was solved mostly by diet and understanding the digestive process. Initially, a pancreatic sparing diet of sardines, apples and brown rice gave the pancreas and liver a break so they could get back to their jobs of making digestive enzymes and bile. That will have an effect on your gall bladder too.

  7. #17
    Although spinal cord injury increases the chance of gall bladder problems, in my case it was a hard lump in the colon that GP could feel. Now on Macrogol 3350 daily. (2 bags of full strength Movicol per day.)

    Anticholinergics will block you up bad. Gave me ileus sent me back to ICU in the 80s. Botox the bladder if using catheters.

    Avoid fatty food to avoid gall bladder problems.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by zagam View Post
    Although spinal cord injury increases the chance of gall bladder problems, in my case it was a hard lump in the colon that GP could feel. Now on Macrogol 3350 daily. (2 bags of full strength Movicol per day.)

    Anticholinergics will block you up bad. Gave me ileus sent me back to ICU in the 80s. Botox the bladder if using catheters.

    Avoid fatty food to avoid gall bladder problems.
    I don't understand what you mean by "anticholinergics will block you up bad."

    I don't understand why people with spinal cord injury are more susceptible to gall bladder problems. What is the link?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    I don't understand what you mean by "anticholinergics will block you up bad."

    I don't understand why people with spinal cord injury are more susceptible to gall bladder problems. What is the link?
    A well-known side effect of all anticholenergics is a decrease in GI peristalsis and motility, which is usually seen as constipation.

    People with SCI are more at risk for gall bladder problems due to their normal decreased GI motility. Transit time in the gut goes from a normal 8-24 hours in ABs to up to 72 hours or longer in people after a SCI/D. This decreased GI motility effects both the gall bladder and common bile duct as well, which usually contract to expel gall into the small intestine when food enters the intestine. If the gall sits or stagnates in the gall bladder for long periods of time, it can precipitate out into gall "sludge" and stones. These often cannot be expelled down the common bile duct due to its poor motility, or because they are too large. It is well known by physicians and nurses who care for people with SCI that they are at higher risk for gall bladder problems. This is one reason why we do an upper right quadrant abdominal ultrasound as part of the annual physical in SCI Veterans, and have a higher level of suspicion for gall bladder problems when someone with a SCI/D has symptoms often seen in SCI different from those in ABs.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
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    The pain I have in the lower right quadrant turned out to be IBS or irritable bowel syndrome.

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